PDA

View Full Version : Video tutorial questions



ernpchan
11-30-2014, 11:20 PM
I'm considering doing my first video tutorial. Can I ask what people like/don't like about tutorials they've watched?

OlaHaldor
12-01-2014, 12:24 AM
Depends on who's the viewer. I'm not a total beginner, but I'm not a pro either, but that doesn't stop me from following an advanced tutorial.

There's tons of videos aiming at the ones who haven't touched anything 3D. I'll say: aim beyond that. Do tutorials that expect the viewer to have some basic knowledge at least. Don't waste time (and download times/space) with 20 minutes of basics like how to navigate the app and so on.

Doing mistakes in the video is fine, but edit them out unless you can figure out a fix while recording. I hate it when I watch a tutorial and I follow everything the tutor does and end up with a big mess, and he doesn't explain what you should or can do to save yourself from doing the same mistake or fix the problem.


Personally I'd like to know more about using Bullet. And with the new possibilities with it I'd like to know more about that as well!
I'd also like to see more use of LWCAD in tutorials. I'm not saying people are stupid if they don't use it, but they're sure missing out of something great. Not everyone use it, but does it hurt to make tutorials with it? Like an arch viz tutorial, everything from model to surface to render. And other ways to use LWCAD as well, not only for arch viz.

That's about all I have early in the morning.

ncr100
12-01-2014, 12:58 AM
Say why to help speed comprehension. Explaining "Why" (why I am doing this thing in the video now) is very often overlooked. Folks just do, which is like a third of the story they could be telling in the video (or text tutorial). Develop a wrote phrase if it helps, "To refine the selection I'll use blablabla...". => "To X I'll Y." It's really important.

Teachers rule, btw.

:)

raw-m
12-01-2014, 02:06 AM
Edit out the chaff!

Danner
12-01-2014, 02:39 AM
Rehearse doing the tutorial before you actually record it, then you won't be fumbling around looking for a tool, and you'll have higher quality and more fluid video that won't need so much editing. Other thing I don't like is when the narrator sounds tired, bored or even stoned. Don't go super high rez or low rez, keep it somewhere in between (720p HD or similar works fine)

Sensei
12-01-2014, 03:45 AM
Rehearse doing the tutorial before you actually record it, then you won't be fumbling around looking for a tool, and you'll have higher quality and more fluid video that won't need so much editing.

I am always couple times repeating step by step whole tutorial, and writing everything on A4 piece of paper, and then while recording real tutorial just looking at screenplay.

Ryan Roye
12-01-2014, 07:21 AM
I'm considering doing my first video tutorial. Can I ask what people like/don't like about tutorials they've watched?

My personal checklist:

- Demonstrate the benefit of what you will be teaching right from the start. Show the results in some way shape or form up front so the user knows what they can accomplish after watching your content.

- Audio quality: USB headset is minimum. It's hard to listen to a tutorial that sounds like its coming out of a low quality radio. A decent recording headset only costs around $30-50.

- Unless mistakes actually serve a purpose, edit them out. No one likes a tutorial that's too long and drawn out when it doesn't need to be and I'm not a fan of hour-long tutorials that don't cover a lot of ground. If Lightwave crashes, or a windows error pops up while you are recording, re-do that part of the video.

- Reduce utterances and vocal content that does not pertain to the subject. Scripting the content ahead of time can help keep this at a minimum. This also cuts down on "filler" that lengthens your video but doesn't add value.

- Don't get caught up on the details; it's easy to get overly zealous on little things when the user just wants the information needed to get the job done. The viewer doesn't always need (or want) to know the intricate workings of Lightwave. The average person doesn't care how lightwave handles rotations under the hood, they don't care how IK works mathematically, they don't care how how Lightwave processes renders... they just want to be able to use tools as intended. Leave the "detailed" stuff for higher-level training materials.

- Know who your main audience is and adjust your tutorial's content accordingly. If you are expecting beginners, avoid omitting instructions relating to hotkeys and UI basics. If you know people watching will be quite informed on your topic of choice, you can assume the viewer knows their way around the UI and what various elements of LW are called. Beginner-level tutorials from my experience are actually harder to do; you can't leave anything out and everything has to be explained.

- Sometimes you might talk about a related subject at some point in the tutorial; users will appreciate it if you put in the extra effort and visually demonstrate this using cuts/fades rather than pausing your on-screen actions. Talking about the importance of clean topology? Visually show the user why this is important! That said, don't expect people to just take your word for it.

erikals
12-01-2014, 08:40 AM
with 900 videos i'm bound to make mistakes, so basically, watch those, you'll find several things

sounding tired, making mistakes, not making chapters or lacking on-screen info, not telling the users what you're up to at the very beginning of a long video (the video title won't always cut it) a bird singing in the background... etc

to me, the previews are free, and there's no way i would have been able to make that amount of vidz if i had to prepare them more.

believe me, it takes a lot of time :/
sometimes a 30min video has to be tested first, then re-recorded 2-3 times because of mistakes
but mostly in a pro video you'll edit it, so you can save some time

just at the same time here trying to explain why my vidz are like they are :° :]

ernpchan
12-01-2014, 09:33 AM
Thanks for the feedback. I've already started scripting/outlining what I want to go over. That process itself is already pretty time consuming.

It's too bad the local user group isn't more regular as I'd use that as a dry run to see how my presentation plays.

Otterman
12-01-2014, 09:42 AM
Andrew Grammer from Video copilot...he's the master. Not only informative but hilarious. We ned someone like that to make Lightwave fun.

Ive got to say I also quite like Ivans style. His ozzy accent is refreshing. Not too technical and he doesn't drone on. Those that do I never manage to stay engaged past 30seconds.

ernpchan
12-01-2014, 09:50 AM
I assume you meant Kramer. :D

Yeah my personality is much more to presenting the info in a more casual fun way. I like chazrikers videos because they're fun and at a good pace.

One thing that I hope to share is the overall production view of problem solving. I've been in a studio environment for 13+ years so I think there's some value to my background.

Just the process of putting the content together is time consuming when I have so little free time to begin with.

Otterman
12-01-2014, 09:55 AM
I assume you meant Kramer. :D.

Curse my dyslexic self.

Well all I can say is 13+ experience you must have a wealth of knowledge worth sharing. I'm a seasoned LW professional but still learn something most days. Look forward to your tuts!

jeric_synergy
12-01-2014, 10:30 AM
NO MUMBLING.

Develop a pleasant, clear voice. (I'm sorry erikals, I very much appreciate all your efforts, but your voice drives me crazy.) My training was in radio, so I'm pretty picky about that, and if people are going to listen to one voice for hours, it better be pleasant. Chazriker and Proton are models to emulate.

If you have a cold, that's a writing day.

About mistakes, or even just repeating: consider inserting, if your s/w supports it, some sort of bookmark to make it easy for users to back up easily to a natural break point. While I usually suppport eliminating mistakes, one person who actually made mistakes work for teaching was Proton, he could spin a mistake into an education moment.

ENUNCIATE.

Chazriker does a good job of adding simple graphics to make things clear/obvious. Lists and options are well presented as text.

Remove all rendering and simulation delays, but it IS nice to know how long something took to process.

ernpchan
12-01-2014, 02:13 PM
NO MUMBLING.

ENUNCIATE.



I don't think I'm a mumbler. My problem is I just talk too fast when my brain has a bunch of information it's trying to convey all at once which can turn into poor enunciation. I'll have to remember to pause and breathe when I rehearse, haha.

jeric_synergy
12-01-2014, 02:17 PM
I'm not accusing you, I'm just saying don't do it.

My bookmarks comment was more innovative. In fact, a little Table Of Contents at the front with timestamps would be great, both as a reference and to show viewers what YOU, The Expert, feel is important.

ernpchan
12-01-2014, 02:20 PM
I'm not accusing you, I'm just saying don't do it.

My bookmarks comment was more innovative. In fact, a little Table Of Contents at the front with timestamps would be great, both as a reference and to show viewers what YOU, The Expert, feel is important.

Oh no, didn't take it as an accusation. 8)

Yes, I like the bookmark idea. This seems to outline how to do it.
http://codeidol.com/graphics/digital-video/Edit/Add-Bookmarks-to-Your-Movie/

Slartibartfast
12-01-2014, 02:58 PM
Don't rotate and pan and zoom objects to keep your fingers busy while talking. It makes me sick. I'd rather stare at a still image for 30 min if the author has something to say. I tried to make this a positive advice, but I couldn't resist typing DON'T as the first word :D

ernpchan
12-01-2014, 03:00 PM
LOL, I talk with my hands, so I imagine I'd be gesturing to nobody versus fiddling with my keyboard/mouse. So I think we're ok there.

spherical
12-01-2014, 03:13 PM
I've done a lot of film and audio. Basic stuff applies.

Agree on scripting, even storyboard it to some extent. Get the flow from beginning to end. This will help to prevent leaving crucial things out. Nothing worse than glossing over what is second nature to you but, to the viewer, is a key element. The craft of tutorials, as well as writing manuals, is:

While Knowing All Of It, You Have To Forget Everything And Teach From That Perspective.

Have all of your assets in a dedicated location. Set up a mimic directory tree that contains everything you will be using. Don't go stumbling around your hard drives looking for stuff and then wondering which version you should open, selecting the wrong ones multiple times and finally getting it right.

Plan up front to edit. Record short segments and edit them together. You will be able to take a break and also not have to remember so much all in one go. You can split the video up into small chunks and re-record entire segments if you either foul up or get a better idea on how to convey what you want. Doing it in a big run dissuades the choice to do it again; which is what should be done.

Agree on mumbling, ummmms, ahhhhhs and proper enunciation and will add: If you sneeze or cough, either edit it out or record the section again. Never say "yaknow". No, I don't know -- that is why I am watching your tutorial. It, along with ummmm, is a placeholder uttered because the speaker thinks that it makes them look stupid to pause and think of what to say. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Pausing actually makes one look better, because they are taking the time to search for the best choice. In general, slow down. Listen to a couple of takes to see how you sound and make adjustments.

Get the sound level right. Normalize the audio to 0dB, so that the listener doesn't have to crank the volume so high, if at all, to hear you. After the video is over, people frequently forget to turn the volume down and their cats are on the ceiling at the next thing that plays.

Place your microphone correctly. Many videos I have seen exhibit the above issue of level, compounded by a lot of room noise. Fans, keyboard and mouse clicks, echoes, general empty cavern sound and hum can be extremely minimized by proper mic placement. Get your signal to noise ratio up and the bad stuff all but disappears and your level is easier to achieve. It needs to be very close to your mouth BUT aiming across from the side. Do not place it in front of your mouth because percussives like "b", "p", "t" create popping and flows like "f", "s" create raspy hisses when spoken directly down the barrel of a mic. These sounds are often forceful enough to clip the signal, creating not only a painful, unpleasant experience for the listener (especially true if they are wearing headphones) but, due to the clipping, can distort the other wavelengths.

Look at other mic placements for examples: Cell phones, headsets, lapel mics all are not in front of the speaker's mouth and pick up the audio waves just fine. Having it very close but not in the line of fire allows you to speak in a natural voice, without straining. This allows you to relax and be more at ease. I have what is known as a "Shotgun Mic". Its sensor is down inside an anechoic tube. This narrows the focus and drastically truncates extraneous noise from the environment. Proper record level is easy to achieve with it.

Stop twiddling the viewports. A viewer is hanging on every sound and movement. When something on screen moves, the viewer's attention is drawn to it because they don't want to miss anything. If rotating the model imparts information and the rotation is deliberate; arriving at a new angle for a reason and stopping there for a bit, that is of course good. If you want to show a model from multiple angles by rotating it without stopping, do it slowly while you describe what you want them to learn. This lets the viewer know that you are showing them something extra. Holding Alt-LMB and wiggling/flipping/gyrating the model in Perspective view is a useless nervous tic. The viewer's attention has been grabbed and it turns out to be just fluff. The viewer has been led astray and it becomes peevish in short order. I've stopped watching videos that do this, because it is so annoying. I don't care that you know the kewl UI tricks. I'm here to learn the difficult stuff.

When you get it all done, run it by at least one other person to gain a fresh take on your take. After having worked on it for any protracted period, you will either be unaware of or ignore certain aspects. Find and fix them.

All of the observations and suggestions in this thread say one thing: Respect Your Audience. Do that and you'll become a Great Teacher.

Sensei
12-01-2014, 03:19 PM
Making video tutorial of yourself as lecturer might be much easier if you have Nikon S6600 thanks to its rotating screen, see
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DpSmpF2U9rQ
I have it. There is limit 30 minutes per continuous movie (like in any digital camera). But better to have EH-62G adapter to not have at least battery limit time.

ernpchan
12-01-2014, 03:30 PM
I've done a lot of film and audio. Basic stuff applies...

Very helpful write up, thx.

jeric_synergy
12-01-2014, 04:39 PM
Don't rotate and pan and zoom objects to keep your fingers busy while talking. It makes me sick.
Oh gahd, yes, what he said.

PLUS, don't compulsively toy with your panel size, as one YouTube LW maven does, CONSTANTLY. It's frickin' annoying. :devil:

Surrealist.
12-01-2014, 10:31 PM
Number one on my list would be having a video tutorial about, lets say, UV mapping, and you spend 1/2 hour talking your way through modeling the model that will be UV mapped. Or a rigging tutorial that starts out with...OK, so here is a cube, now we are going to box model a simple character...

The second would be tutorials that start out with a static screen and the person talking for, sometimes quite a lot of time.

Best practice would be to be succinct about your tutorials. Make them get right to the point of the tutorial and get through it quickly.

And last but not least, anything that requires a lot of repeated steps.... pause the video. We don't need to be a fly on the wall through your tedious processes. So many guys do this. Get to the point that we understand what this is. Once the point is made, skip ahead. We can always pause and replay the parts that were not clear. And we can bring the process though ourselves.

Generally do not meander, get to the point and plan the tutorial so it is always spending time going over something new.

The one exception is perhaps more artistic tutorials like sculpting. If you are real good, it is nice to watch you through the process, as it is always good to watch another artist go through a process in his own way.

3D Kiwi
12-01-2014, 10:52 PM
Dont record the mouse clicks or have your capture software zoom around the screen, really bugs me.

I also find it boring to watch a static screen while they talk about something. Cut to a shot of yourself talking. Would be a whole lot more intresting.

ernpchan
12-01-2014, 11:03 PM
Are you talking about the sound of the mouse clicks?

Not sure people wanna see me actually talk, haha.

Oedo 808
12-01-2014, 11:34 PM
I hate the recording software adding mouse click sound effects in videos, so I'm guessing it's that.

So long as you don't make any major screw ups, I wouldn't worry about editing out small mistakes too much, personally I don't like tutorials to be too sterile or entirely scripted with a cheesy phone voice.

So yeah, plan it out, cut the chaff and don't mumble, but don't be anal about it.

Sound quality is always a big plus.

wesleycorgi
12-02-2014, 12:03 AM
I agree with both William Vaughan and Andrew Kramer as being at the top of their game. I also like Dan Ablan's style.

Ernest: whenever you've presented at the LW Siggraph booths, I thought you did a great job.

3D Kiwi
12-02-2014, 12:14 AM
Are you talking about the sound of the mouse clicks?

Not sure people wanna see me actually talk, haha.

Yea i think it is kurv studios. they have a big round circle around the mouse pointer and then a loud click everytime the tutor clicks the mouse. Even when they are just rotating the screen. Very annoying.

spherical
12-02-2014, 12:48 AM
Heh, not only that, cite all of the observations in my post above and then view the "Getting into ZBrush" set. You'll be forever put off. Unprofessional doesn't even scratch the surface; not that my observations are confined to that set of tutorials at all. MANY that I have had the displeasure to watch/hear exhibit the same or similar flaws/disregardences.

djwaterman
12-02-2014, 12:49 AM
What I hate more than anything is when I see rude comments in YouTube comments like "Dude, can you stop sniffing, sounds like you got Ebola" or "This is a very ____ tutorial, thanks for wasting my time you ____". I see comments like that on what I think are good tutorials so it makes me wonder what super standards some people think they deserve for free. And I like mouse clicks but not the circle, but it's not any kind of deal breaker, I can learn something new from any tutorial, pro or amateur.

My only advice (which is obvious and useless but bound to happen) make sure your mic is switched on and recording, it's no fun after muscling your way through a 20/30 minute exercise to then realize you have to do it again because you forgot to plug the mic in.

You'll never please everybody, I dislike tutorials that have a guys face up in the corner, yet some people like that, or loud thumping trance music, but people inquire about the music being played. If you do it all fast and neat some people will say they couldn't keep up. A lot of people complain about Andrew Kramer's time wasting jokes ( I like em), personally I don't like perfectly clear all up in my ear audio, but that's the standard everyone will tell you to go for. So I'd say do a few test ones to see how it goes, it will become pretty obvious to you if it's working or not.

spherical
12-02-2014, 12:57 AM
personally I don't like perfectly clear all up in my ear audio, but that's the standard everyone will tell you to go for.

Annnnnd.... what is your reasoning for that???? How can clear, properly processed audio ever be a bad thing?

Wickedpup
12-02-2014, 01:30 AM
Yes, I like the bookmark idea.
Watch Nicholas Boughens videos at CG-masters, think that solution is brilliant. The timeline is divided and when your marker hover over one of the sections a topic description of that section appears. No need to search through the whole video if you´re looking for something particular......

djwaterman
12-02-2014, 03:39 AM
Annnnnd.... what is your reasoning for that???? How can clear, properly processed audio ever be a bad thing?

It lacks atmosphere. I like imperfections, especially in audio. I have already decided to go against my own taste because a few people complained about the levels on one of my tutorials so I will be doing what everyone else does next time, if I ever do any more tutorials, because frankly they are hard work.

ernpchan
12-02-2014, 04:39 AM
Ernest: whenever you've presented at the LW Siggraph booths, I thought you did a great job.

Ha, thanks. Those things are always a bit stressful for me.


Don't trip walking up on stage
Pray you don't fall out of the chair as you climb up on it
Make sure I'm talking clearly
Talk loudly without making it feel like you're shouting at the poor people
Don't embarrass my employer
Don't embarrass Rob or LightWave
Don't embarrass myself
Don't embarrass my family
Remember everything I wanna talk about
Think on my feet for all of Rob's questions
Stop talking so fast
Don't drop a F bomb by accident
Stop thinking about wanting to sneeze
Remember to make eye contact so people won't discover you're a robot devoid of human emotion
.......

Let's just say it's 90% anxiety 10% fun. I always feel like I come across as some neurotic squirrel lol.

- - - Updated - - -


Watch Nicholas Boughens videos at CG-masters, think that solution is brilliant. The timeline is divided and when your marker hover over one of the sections a topic description of that section appears. No need to search through the whole video if you´re looking for something particular......

Do you have a link?

ernpchan
12-02-2014, 04:41 AM
if I ever do any more tutorials, because frankly they are hard work.
Yes, I'm discovering how much work has to go into just explaining the most basic of things.

OnlineRender
12-02-2014, 04:56 AM
Yes, I'm discovering how much work has to go into just explaining the most basic of things.

pretty much do the opposite of this video tutorial I made ... I was getting stick for my accent, that and the kid was in the room at the time so it was near impossible so we had fun with it....


http://youtu.be/VxtjeH5PW-8?list=UUNjVzbOHcgou_LGBVnJx4lQ

ernpchan
12-02-2014, 05:01 AM
Haha.

I can see what people mean about the mouse clicking now though it's hard to tell if that's really how loud your mouse is or a result of the screen recording software adding it.

OnlineRender
12-02-2014, 05:12 AM
Haha.

I can see what people mean about the mouse clicking now though it's hard to tell if that's really how loud your mouse is or a result of the screen recording software adding it.

I use camtasia that lets you add " clicks" and audio , it's pretty good for zooming into the application also ... although the editor is clunky as hell

OlaHaldor
12-02-2014, 06:37 AM
Whether you plan to edit or not, I can really vouch for Open Broadcaster. It's free. It records the entire screen. It can record your system audio (or not). It can record your webcam/mostly any other video input. You can also use it for streaming on YouTube etc. And it's possible to set the bitrate as you see fit. And you can record pretty much any framerate you want. (1-60fps, and beyond)

So if you're thinking you'll be editing, record at a higher bitrate so you have some overhead for the compression after editing.
If you have Premiere or something, use that for editing. I simply cannot see any reason to shed a lot of money on Camtasia. It does not use the GPU for encoding (as far as I know), and the editor is clunky, as others have mentioned. You can basically do all the same with Premiere and After Effects - if not faster - at least with a lot more control and finesse.

tommyc
12-02-2014, 08:25 AM
Make sure you're actually recording before you start. Don't just hit the record button and dive right in. I have a few paid tutorials where the guy starts before the recording software was actually ready.

Leave a few seconds at the beginning and end of each part you record. It will help if you later use transitions between segments or you an just trim it off when assembling the final video.

WilliamVaughan
12-02-2014, 08:45 AM
Have fun and the videos will turn out great. If you dont have fun they will be dry, boring and stiff.

I look forward to seeing what you come up with!

ernpchan
12-02-2014, 10:20 AM
Have fun and the videos will turn out great. If you dont have fun they will be dry, boring and stiff.

I look forward to seeing what you come up with!

Thanks Proton! If my vids are half as good as yours I'll be happy.

Cageman
12-02-2014, 10:59 AM
As long as you don't charge for them, you are free to do whatever you want, imho.

Cageman
12-02-2014, 11:07 AM
Here is another tip...

If you have an NVidia Graphics card, 6xx or better, you can use Shadowplay (part of GeForce Experience which is a free application found over at NVidia.com). This allows you to capture full screen in 60+ fps (it allows to capture Desktop as well as microphone). Run it through an editing software and make it 30fps. This makes a hell of a lot smoother viewing experience, especially tutorials concerning animation.

EDIT: These are saved in high quality mp4 format and the capture is also "smart" in that it optimize to only record what is changing. A busy game will last for about 15 minutes in 1920x1080 before the encoder has to switch to a new file. This is due to a 3.6GB sizelimit and the switch is so fast it is only a short "blink" when putting them together in an editing software. A LightWave tutorial can be an hour, easily, if there isn't that much going on on screen.

ernpchan
12-02-2014, 12:03 PM
As long as you don't charge for them, you are free to do whatever you want, imho.

What changes if they're not free?

Ryan Roye
12-02-2014, 12:23 PM
What changes if they're not free?

Expectations :)

ernpchan
12-02-2014, 12:42 PM
Expectations :)

Sure, that's fair. TBH I don't think I'll do this as a free tutorial considering how much work I want to put into it.

Cageman
12-02-2014, 01:44 PM
What changes if they're not free?

To be honest...

I've learned a lot more from free tutorials than any commercial tutorial. That is probably because I can stand the "not so pro" (regarding the editing/sound etc) tutorials from users who are doing things with LW that, in some cases, can be measured with Houdini in terms of procedural/parametric approach (except the modeling part of it since LW isn't really Houdini).

I, myself, do videotutorials from time to time... I really don't care how "pro" or "not so pro" it is. I really couldn't give a rats *** about it. I share my knowledge for free, and if someone can't stand the way I do things, then... it is their loss, not mine.

So, if you want to sell tutorials, make sure you are pixel-perfect in everything you do regarding what you show on screen. Audiowave perfect in eveything you say.. Those are the most important parts... the least important part is to focus on the subject at hand; what it is you want to teach.

In that order, if you want to sell tutorials. ;)

Cageman
12-02-2014, 01:56 PM
What I am really saing is this... William Vaughan is ON THE SPOT regarding video tutorials. There is no right/wrong about tutorials. If people want to learn about a subject, it doesn't really matter what you do, as long as you get the point across at some point. Be yourself and develop your own style of making tutorials. Some people have flashy intros/outros, some edit their videos so tight it becomes like a rap-album.

I can take any style, if I know I want to learn something from someone I know knows a lot about the subject at hand.

Don't try to be "Pro"... be yourself instead. Makes it so much mor personal and interesting which makes it "Pro".

At the end of the day... it is about sharing knowledge, free or commercial.

ernpchan
12-02-2014, 05:41 PM
Lot of food for thought. I'm not opposed to sharing knowledge as I've certainly gained a lot from others. I guess it's that fine line of balancing what ones time is worth.

Cageman
12-02-2014, 05:54 PM
If you really want feedback regarding a"pro" tutorial...

Pick a subject you feel could have some more input. A small subject that you can cover in 10 minutes. Make a free tutorial about it. Post it here on the NT-forums or send it to people you trust with honest opinions if you are shy. Make sure to add in the description: How could I have made this tutorial better?

spherical
12-02-2014, 08:36 PM
If you have an NVidia Graphics card, 6xx or better, you can use Shadowplay

Now, THAT is cool! I've had it all this time and never explored what it is. I set a Custom and recorded at 30FPS/1080p and it looked as smooth as anyone would expect. I had been recording my Shadowplay set up and when the video had completed, clicked on the close button on IT. D'Oh! What I'd like in it is to have either a limited region or record only a specific active window. Didn't find any options along those lines. Are there any?

ConjureBunny
12-02-2014, 09:33 PM
I will always gladly pay to hear someone tell me how to do something better, if they know their stuff.

But I have a really, really short attention span, so I prefer videos that are broken into small chunks that show how to do a specific thing. That way, if I want to know how to do something later, I can just go back and watch that one video.

I just wish there were programming videos as good as some of the 3D modeling videos.

-C

ernpchan
12-02-2014, 09:40 PM
Yeah, with all my note taking there are already a lot of chapter/act breaks which is probably good as it'll give me a chance to rehydrate.

spherical
12-02-2014, 10:16 PM
The issue I have with small dedicated-to-one-task tutorials is that:


They do not flow together well, because they are segmented from the start. IOW, it is a design feature that drives the whole operation. This leaves ample opportunity/tendency to NOT have them dovetail into one another. Flow isn't a consideration. In most operations, there are crossovers from one to the other.
Quite often, there are preamble items that it seems have to be covered; just to be complete. If the tutorials are completely separate, then they must be included. These preambles are like the stuff that Chris Hardwick says at the start of every darn Talking Dead. If you are a Walking Dead fan, by this time--after this many seasons, you've HEARD IT and know where to go for whatever... or not. I get that there are always latecomers to the party but, for those of us (most), it's a total waste of air time.


So, some sort of hybrid would be best. Segment the tutorial into parts that specify prerequisites and, if possible, provide a link to the next segment. Then, the viewer can load up the part they need at will and not have to deal with the basic stuff that a completely separate tutorial would have to cover.

ernpchan
12-02-2014, 10:53 PM
Are you referring to a tutorial that is very specific in its teaching? Meaning the instruction has no context/application outside of what it's teaching. Like a tutorial that shows you how to build a rock without explaining how the tools to make that rock could be used to build non-rock items.

Or the individual chapters within a tutorial?

spherical
12-02-2014, 11:15 PM
Well, both, actually. If they are totally segregated and have only oblique relationships to each other, when they actually are closely integrated when considered as such, they should be chapters and relate to each other with back/forward links and/or prerequisites of each indicated in some way.

If it is a one-off, like constructing a rock, and the tools to be used are assumed to already be known, then the tutorial can be a stand-alone; having no preamble with which to get started. Even in this case, there would need to be indicated, perhaps on a web page that holds all of this type, a heads-up stating that, before you access these, make sure you are at least at level X in how to run the application. This does away with all of the repeated lead-up, because the clue level is assumed. Still a set of prerequisites; just in a different form.

Ryan Roye
12-03-2014, 07:01 AM
I have to agree with ConjureBunny, especially if the content entails more open-ended concepts like is often the case with modeling where every tool is essentially separate.

With rigging and stuff I feel larger "chunks" are required because a lot of tools used are directly related to eachother. If I were to re-do my IKBooster training content, the first section covering all the tools and their purposes would still be one long video as it is solely purposed for making the viewer aware what tools exist and how to use them, but I'd feel a lot better breaking up the rigging workflow into smaller segments like so:

- Setting up the skeleton (focusing on structure and base control scheme)
- Applying and correcting deformations to the character
- Facial rigging with endomorphs
- 1-3 other videos that show all of the above concepts being applied to different creatures like quadrapeds
- Any misc videos demonstrating special case scenarios

So, there's definitely a balance to be had here.

m.d.
12-03-2014, 09:07 AM
Alex Alvarez from gnomon was always my favorite tutorial maker.....mostly maya stuff but it was organized and concise



This new guy is doing some design stuff....but probably the highest quality tutorials I've seen....perhaps ever
http://youtu.be/yE3ftltJRbA

OnlineRender
12-03-2014, 11:18 AM
one of the reasons I never made lwiki commercial regarding tutorials was basically down to the fact, they would need to be better quality than digital tutors or at least on par, and that takes hard work & time.
that said if done correct and the product is priced accordingly,marketed correctly you could make a killing, even on the low side of 100 sales @ $25, would be a good gig.

Davewriter
12-03-2014, 10:25 PM
When I am paying for one... I REALLY appropriate when the presenter has done a bit of work putting things together. That it isn't filled with a lot of errr's or uh,this usually works. William Vaughan, Rebel Hill & Ryan Royce are prime examples of how to do it well. When done well, broken up into digestible bits and covers the things listed on the "box" - I'm in all the way.
That's not to say that errors or mistakes have to be edited out. Sometimes watching how the workaround is achieved can be most enlightening. It also makes me feel better when I make a world of mistakes.
But if someone is taking 15 minutes trying hard to remember where "the button" is, or doesn't edit out restarts when the system crashes - in a vid that is only 45 minutes long... I start wondering just how much Bang I got.
No doubt about it, LWers are some of the most giving folks out there. The free stuff is a mixed bag, but one certainly worth working through.
But I often tend to take the easy way out. And for those subjects out there that are simply "mystical" to me - here, RH take my money because I know that everything I could ever want to know about rigging will be there in front of me in one place. Ryan - show me how to play in the world of IKB.
I'm happy for free - but being able to Really tackle an area is much more useful.
For me.

spherical
12-03-2014, 10:35 PM
Agreed. The Getting Into ZBrush that I mentioned above, the presenter would cough directly into the microphone; nearly blowing my eardrums out, because I had headphones on. A person in an adjacent apartment started hammering and, not only did he leave that in -- stopping his presentation until it got quiet, he put up a graphic about it! Other times, he would cite a particular UI item and say: "Don't know what that is, never use it, myself." Huh? And I paid money for this!?

ConjureBunny
12-04-2014, 07:32 PM
Other times, he would cite a particular UI item and say: "Don't know what that is, never use it, myself." Huh? And I paid money for this!?

Oh man. I've heard that so many times I can't count. I'm not paying to have someone explore the UI with me!

-Chilton

ernpchan
12-23-2014, 02:55 PM
For those of you that have done screen recordings...what fps do you set your record to?

Sensei
12-23-2014, 02:57 PM
If you don't want jumping, of course 25 fps is minimum. Default is 30 fps.

ernpchan
12-23-2014, 03:07 PM
Thanks Sensei.

raw-m
12-24-2014, 06:30 AM
I let the Screen capture software sort all that out as YT/Vimeo etc are happy at whatever. On the mac, there's a screen capture software called ScreenFlow and it's great! It has its own editor built in which is surprisingly good, allows me to easily edit as I go. Saves a ton of time.

summerslover
04-11-2016, 09:32 PM
I am not a pro video editing guy either but I do enjoy the process of try different things. When I watching some other tutorials, I would like to choose what I'm interested and the uploader's experiences in this field. Is he or she good at this one or what this tutorial shown is just part of the whole stuffs. Another thing is if the tutorial video display some important things while there are some explanation of common mistakes or problems, maybe, like wrong settings or audio sync problem or simply some helpful tricks.
:)

prometheus
04-12-2016, 11:41 AM
One presenter I always liked...was William Vaughan..except for the skills and experience he has, it was the way how he talks, educational and with a clear and comfortable voice without going..ehhm..ahhm..wait a minute etc, leave all that stuff out..if you do not know what you are doing under a recorded session and tries to find it out during the session at the expense of the viewers time and discomfort, don´t....shut it down and record a new one and better, if it is to be paid for that is reasonable.
Perhaps doing a story board to follow exactly so you do not do mistakes, unless you are very skilled in remembering it all.

As I recall ..if William had some troubles our things weren´t going as expected in his tutorials..he always managed to explain directly and properly why certain things happened, and thus the mistakes was often due to workflow issues, and not so much about what he might have done wrong...so in such case the mistakes served to give valuable info.

I wouldn´t want to pay for tutorials that are presented in too long sections, if possible smaller ones with chapters properly described.

If you are doing some free tutorials..all the above might be easy to overlook though, but at the same time it might not serve you well ..If and once you may want to sell a commercial tutorial and folks have been watching your free ones with mistakes and uhhs and aahhmms.:D

spherical
04-12-2016, 05:06 PM
William also doesn't constantly twiddle the viewport, like so many do. Annoying as hell. We know you know the slick keyboard modifiers. Give it a rest... literally. If it is a nervous habit, get into the habit of completely removing your hand from the trackball/mouse when you are going to talk a bit about something that doesn't require the model to rotate/translate. Unprofessionalism at its highest otherwise. Twiddle, twiddle, wiggle, twiddle, twiddle, wiggle, twiddle, twiddle, twiddle, twiddle, wiggle, twiddle, twiddle, twiddle, twiddle..... wiggle.

jeric_synergy
04-12-2016, 07:02 PM
William also doesn't constantly twiddle the viewport, like so many do. Annoying as hell.
No effing kidding.

Maybe I'm just prejudiced, but I think the Mac-based presenters twiddle more. Awful.

Proton also did a good job of narrowing down the subject to just enough to learn on a nice clean screen, and as someone said, when he rarely goofed up, he made it a learning opportunity. --And of course he continues to do so, but less frequently.

Schwyhart
04-12-2016, 07:16 PM
Everyone has basically said it.
-Rehearse
-Great Quality Audio
-Give Scenarios
-Give Explanations (ex. "This tool works this way only because...." or "We need to do it this way because...")
-Short Segments (I don't want to watch an hour long tutorial. Break into sections)

jeric_synergy
04-12-2016, 07:35 PM
One thing: point out CRITICAL but easily overlooked parameters: like, if you start with 9-sided instead of 8-sided cylinders in a subpatch tutorial, your life might become very difficult. Critical numbers should be specified, and 'underlined' metaphorically.

That one has bit me more than once.

Reco
04-13-2016, 06:02 AM
It is important to do it technical right, but it is also important how you build up you tutorial/training.

1. Explain what you are going to do, and what we can expect. Here is one example of how to not
do it. https://vimeo.com/108154782 It is a good training though, but it doesn’t include a sailship producing wakes.

2. Don’t try to explain everything at once.

3. Don’t jump straight into issues. Leave issues to later chapters when the viewers are more familiar with what’s going on.

4. Start simple and show the basic, before jumping into the more complex part of the tutorial.

5. Explain what you are doing, and why. Don’t say “you can select this, but other people may do it in a different way”. You can
off course talk about different workflows, but I want to know why you prefer yours.

6. Pro and cons are very important. If you are a part of a team, you will have a more dynamic development of experience than
a person who is working by him/her self. Pro and cons will shear some of this experience.

7. Sum up in the end. If it is about rendering, show the final render.

Reco