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Niko3D
11-26-2014, 08:11 AM
Hi folks!

Eternal question...
Which Graphic Card do I have to buy?I use it in professional way for ArchiViz (still and animation)...at the moment no Octane, maybe in the future...just native render engine.

Any suggestions?

zapper1998
11-26-2014, 12:10 PM
Titan Z

yep yep

spherical
11-26-2014, 05:04 PM
Workstations cards (Quadros) handle viewport draw better. They are CAD/Data cards and are designed to tumble massive amounts of points/lines.

Consumer cards (GTX/Titan) will do better if/when you get Octane or Thea. Their GPU functions are better at images. Actually, they are the same chip, the Consumer cards have the high-end functions disabled. An old GTX580 will work better in Modeler than a 6xx, 7xx, 9xx, Titan, as they were made before the disabling began on later series of cards.

Niko3D
11-27-2014, 02:50 AM
mmmm...Interesting!!!:)
I think I'll launch myself into Titan Z...just because in the future I would like to move in Octane. In any case I think that there are not will be a huge difference...both are really good and powerful cards!(I hope...eheheheh)

Thanks a lot for your suggestions!

allabulle
11-28-2014, 05:22 AM
In my new rig I use a small Quadro K620 driving the dual 24" monitors and a GTX 780 (6GB RAM) for CUDA computing.

Since LightWave doesn't really demand too much of the graphics card, there wasn't really a need to buy a bigger Quadro for what I do. But with the drivers, I can set per program options on what card is used for OpenGL or CUDA. I have disabled CUDA computing in the Quadro and enabled it in the GTX. But I can, and sometimes do, enable OpenGL computing on the GTX and in some instances it's noticeable. With more demanding aplicatons the superior power of the GTX is used then. So all in all, I buy a small Quadro for the drivers, really.

It may be worth testing it. A small or half decent Quadro and a Titan could do wonders at a cheaper price point and you don't necessarily need to choose between one or the other (as in Quadro or GTX, I mean). Being said that, you should try it if possible before. I don't know how good it would work on any other given software combination.

Niko3D
11-28-2014, 06:03 AM
In my new rig I use a small Quadro K620 driving the dual 24" monitors and a GTX 780 (6GB RAM) for CUDA computing.

Since LightWave doesn't really demand too much of the graphics card, there wasn't really a need to buy a bigger Quadro for what I do. But with the drivers, I can set per program options on what card is used for OpenGL or CUDA. I have disabled CUDA computing in the Quadro and enabled it in the GTX. But I can, and sometimes do, enable OpenGL computing on the GTX and in some instances it's noticeable. With more demanding aplicatons the superior power of the GTX is used then. So all in all, I buy a small Quadro for the drivers, really.

It may be worth testing it. A small or half decent Quadro and a Titan could do wonders at a cheaper price point and you don't necessarily need to choose between one or the other (as in Quadro or GTX, I mean). Being said that, you should try it if possible before. I don't know how good it would work on any other given software combination.

Hi!
Yes I know...but I need to look at a really good cards for the future...so I think the Titan Z is better for me now...;)

allabulle
11-28-2014, 06:59 AM
Yes, surely. I'm not saying otherwise. If you want to add a mid-range Quadro later on for a fraction of the money of a high-end model you could probably still have the benefits of a Quadro driver and the power of the OpenGL and CUDA that the Titans (dual Titan in the case of a Titan Z) provide.

For some CAD applications, having the Quadro drivers is a must, but having a top of the line model not being necessarily the question, performance-wise.

Sekhar
11-28-2014, 09:20 AM
I'm about to buy a card myself and researched the whole Quadro vs. GTX thing. My finding is that the ONLY material reason you'd want to shell out $ for a Quadro is if you need to support 10 bit monitors: you can't do 10 bit OpenGL out from GTX, for example. For computations though (CUDA/OpenCL), GTX has way more bang/buck and even an el cheapo GTX will do better in most cases. Quadros are also supposed to have drivers that are better optimized for apps rather than games, but the benchmarks I've seen are all over the place and don't support this claim. Other benefits of Quadros that you may or may not care about: higher reliability (GTX are reliable too, so I don't know what this means), leaner form factors (not as fat), and lower power consumption.

Niko3D
12-01-2014, 03:18 AM
Yes, surely. I'm not saying otherwise. If you want to add a mid-range Quadro later on for a fraction of the money of a high-end model you could probably still have the benefits of a Quadro driver and the power of the OpenGL and CUDA that the Titans (dual Titan in the case of a Titan Z) provide.

For some CAD applications, having the Quadro drivers is a must, but having a top of the line model not being necessarily the question, performance-wise.

Yes of course!Maybe in the future I can add another mid-range cards...or not...Thank you!:)

Niko3D
12-01-2014, 03:22 AM
I'm about to buy a card myself and researched the whole Quadro vs. GTX thing. My finding is that the ONLY material reason you'd want to shell out $ for a Quadro is if you need to support 10 bit monitors: you can't do 10 bit OpenGL out from GTX, for example. For computations though (CUDA/OpenCL), GTX has way more bang/buck and even an el cheapo GTX will do better in most cases. Quadros are also supposed to have drivers that are better optimized for apps rather than games, but the benchmarks I've seen are all over the place and don't support this claim. Other benefits of Quadros that you may or may not care about: higher reliability (GTX are reliable too, so I don't know what this means), leaner form factors (not as fat), and lower power consumption.

I use just two monitors...and all I need.
I looked the Quadro vs Titan Z as well...and I agree with you.

Thank you!

12-01-2014, 06:38 AM
For all cuda-enabled applications, the cheap and expensive work well together. I have an older card for my two monitors with a Titan running the cuda operations. i tried it with only the Titan: horrible hang ups when rendering though a crazy fast interface.

So don't get rid of the card you have as it may be of use to you in the near future.

Niko3D
12-02-2014, 03:14 AM
Thanks...I'll let you know!!!;)