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grafxstudio
10-24-2014, 10:28 PM
Would you build the whole animation or would you break it down in smaller segments? I'm building a haunted woods and would like to know what someone with more experience say their 2 cents.
Larry

ernpchan
10-25-2014, 08:21 AM
If you're talking about animating smaller clips in their own file and then merging them into a single file or through compositing, then yes that would be a good way to go. Layout's performance will suffer the more dense your scene and fast feedback is important during the animation process.

Knowing what you're specifically trying to do would help.

Sensei
10-25-2014, 09:01 AM
Would you build the whole animation or would you break it down in smaller segments? I'm building a haunted woods and would like to know what someone with more experience say their 2 cents.
Larry

First of all, you shouldn't render to animation file, but to image sequence.

About animation- that depends whether parts are one continuous move of single camera, or cameras are switching from one to another, then to another.

If it's one long movement of single camera, scene most likely shouldn't be split. Unless you are making flight above city etc. gigantic project.

To do such switching there is needed Layout Master > Camera Selector (there are two).
Beware. They won't work with renderfarm.
You need to bake cameras to single keyframed camera using f.e. TrueArt's Camera Selector Baker (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NbzvJUye9A) (video tutorial) plugin. Plugin website (http://modelingpack.trueart.eu).
After that it will be rendering fine on renderfarm as one image sequence.

Ryan Roye
10-25-2014, 09:08 AM
For solo work, I'd say keeping your scenes merged into fewer files is ok, especially if the assets are heavier on animation than they are on memory load (large textures, dense base geometry, etc). I always use this approach when working on my personal projects. If your haunted woods assets are quite dense, I'd leave any unneeded background elements packaged in a separate scene so that they aren't adding to the overall CPU/Memory burden whilst animating.

For client work and work that consists of you working in a team of some sort, I'd absolutely recommend breaking things up into separate scenes. It helps you not step on other people's toes, and makes it easier to fulfill change requests asked for by the producer or director.

If you are still unsure as to what approach is right for you, my recommendation would be to throw every single asset you're working with into your project, dialing down the settings and visibility on all of the non-critical assets necessary to allow you to animate, and observing the performance hit; you can figure things out from that point. Your goal is to get playback speed as close to the actual FPS as possible.

bazsa73
10-25-2014, 01:04 PM
Break it whenever you feel it would increase the drama. Otherwise keep it as one.

Surrealist.
10-25-2014, 05:08 PM
Would you build the whole animation or would you break it down in smaller segments? I'm building a haunted woods and would like to know what someone with more experience say their 2 cents.
Larry

Hey Larry,

One approach is to first make some kind of storyboard, it can be primitive. But it should show you what you want in each shot. If it is a continuous shot, you could storyboard the key points you want to hit. After that you can then time it to sound of some kind. Use SFX and music and get a feel for the overall piece using a NLE. After that you can start to build your scenes as Ryan suggests, shot by shot. In my opinion a fresh scene for each shot. At least that is how I do it.

Another approach is to build scenes around the character animation. Where you take the camera out of it completely at first. No storyboard. Just animate and build your scene. Then go around with the camera and find interesting angles to break up shots or angles that help tell the story. After you have this, then set up your lighting for each shot etc and move down the line to completed scenes.