PDA

View Full Version : Mesh fusion



Amurrell
10-08-2014, 04:09 PM
I like the concept of mesh fusion, but I don't like the poly count afterwards, and I have seen places where it isn't always needed. As in the image below. I found this part on Mood's forums and the poster stated that it would be tricky to make this portion without mesh fusion, so I thought "Challenge accepted" and cooked up my response in 30min or less. Not perfect, but just trying to hammer through as fast as I could. What are your thoughts on Mesh fusion and if you use it, do you find yourself falling back on it more, or do you still use sub-d modeling on those small parts?

124857

djwaterman
10-08-2014, 04:58 PM
I think you proved your point. I guess if you didn't have the 30 minutes and poly-flow wasn't an issue then Mesh Fusion makes sense.

WilliamVaughan
10-08-2014, 05:52 PM
I personally find Mesh Fusion to be a god send for hard surface modeling and although I have modeled without it for almost 20 years, I'm quite happy having it in my toolkit now. That example tho easier with Mesh Fusion wouldnt be an example I would use. The detergent bottle at the bottom of this page is a better example imho:

http://pushingpoints.com/v2/mesh-fusion-for-modo/

Took minutes with MF and much much longer without. And the key feature of MF is the interactivity and the fact that it's still live.... making ti easy to experiment and make massive changes in seconds. So if I wanted to change the shapes of plastic milk crate on the same page I linked to above with Mesh Fusion I could be looking at a complete remodel.... with MF it's all still live making it easy to explore shapes and change it. Not to mention the ability to put seam lines in without any heavy lifting.


What's cool about 3D is there are so many ways to go about creating anything... lots of choices for us to choose from and I welcome that freedom. Cool time to be an artist!

Dodgy
10-08-2014, 06:11 PM
I find Metamesh from 3d powers is good for this sort of thing, it's almost equivalent. It booleans with all quads/tris, and if you turn on the Make Welding Band, it leaves a nice crisp edge around the boolean cut. It doesn't have the history stack Mesh Fusion does, but it also doesn't result in millions of polys. You just have to ensure the meshes are of a reasonable density so the curvature is maintained. It's also interactive, so you can move the boolean object and see it update.
http://www.3rdpowers.com/index_store.html

Snosrap
10-08-2014, 07:39 PM
Mesh Fusion is a great addition to Modo. I gave it a go a while back with the 801 demo and it is just amazing. It's really well suited for product design plus much more. One of these days I might upgrade, but I just haven't been in the mood to spend money as of late. :)

erikals
10-08-2014, 11:38 PM
http://forums.newtek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=124857&d=1412806111&thumb=1

i'd just use regular polys on this one... followed by Rounder

MeshFusion & MetaMesh are still great though

Lewis
10-09-2014, 01:00 AM
Well the biggest advantage/point of doing it with MF is so you can easily change/adapt it sin eit's parametric/Live while with regular modeling (at least in LWM/ regular modo techniques) it's destructive so any changes it's PITA. Especially bevels/rounding edges. Try something with holes/joints and then client decides they want different bevel/rounder/chamfer on most of edges, you are "screwed" with regular technique in LWM then :(.

Technically you can model anything with traditional subDs (heck I've even modeled Arch-Viz building once in full subDs ;)) but required time and complication is much harder and changes/fixes are big issue and very time consuming so Meshfusion is much powerful and faster in those situations.

visualbug
10-09-2014, 01:35 AM
I thing that going straight with nurbs modelling is the option to go, Moi3d is simple, powerful and export the best .obj from a nurbs that any other software in the industry...........and the same price like "mesh fusion" (groboto's son jejeje)

Amurrell
10-09-2014, 01:38 AM
I take your points. I was just wondering since I have never used it. Looks versatile, but all of those polys scare me for some reason, almost like I would quickly run out of resources. The results are great, as far as I can tell and would help with complex objects. I just didn't see where it would be needed on simple objects so much. I suppose it has its uses there as well. I do have an idea for a project that could make great use of this. Maybe I should give it a try.

hrgiger
10-09-2014, 05:21 AM
Well its pretty much like Zbrush. Creating good models in Zbrush sometimes will require millions of polygons but with good retopology tools, its not an issue.

I personally wasn't impressed when I first saw Mesh Fusion but I now see the benefits it offers and would use it most likely. But again, with Zbrush, you can achieve very similar functionality as far as Booleans and complex mixing of shapes.