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erikals
10-04-2014, 01:06 PM
my Grandfather used to do that,
Rub-down text, French Curves, etc etc...

http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif


http://vimeo.com/95415863

spherical
10-04-2014, 03:41 PM
Heh. Grandfather? Yer killin' me. I still have all that stuff, although the Letraset sheets have long since become unviable. I use physical tools on occasion when the need arises, but obviously have moved on to current tech. 6' (1.828m) adjustable drafting board with channel drafting machine, ships curves, dividers, compasses, circle and ellipse templates, lead holders; the whole nine yards (8.2296m). :D Use them mostly when doing technical illustration or fine art in traditional media. No substitute for the right tools. If you know how to use them, they're invaluable. Increasingly, they're becoming the things of museums and, like quills, will fall into the realm of quaint curiosities. One thing that the current tech does not offer and that is the tactile experience of working with one's tools and watching over your own shoulder as something comes into reality right before your eyes. A keyboard and trackball/mouse just doesn't hold a candle to fine tools. Fewer and fewer of us can have the joy of experiencing it.

erikals
10-04-2014, 04:34 PM
http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif

Fewer and fewer of us can have the joy of experiencing it.

yes, i think so too, surprisingly though, i might be going back "to the future"
as i'll probably be looking into more handcraft related work (as well)

but overall, 3D and 3D printers will "rule" the world... http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif



i remember btw in carpenter class at first we had to use the old tools, agh... that took time...

http://www.woodworkingplansdepot.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Woodworking-hand-tools.jpg

shrox
10-04-2014, 06:21 PM
Heh. Grandfather? Yer killin' me. I still have all that stuff, although the Letraset sheets have long since become unviable. I use physical tools on occasion when the need arises, but obviously have moved on to current tech. 6' (1.828m) adjustable drafting board with channel drafting machine, ships curves, dividers, compasses, circle and ellipse templates, lead holders; the whole nine yards (8.2296m). :D Use them mostly when doing technical illustration or fine art in traditional media. No substitute for the right tools. If you know how to use them, they're invaluable. Increasingly, they're becoming the things of museums and, like quills, will fall into the realm of quaint curiosities. One thing that the current tech does not offer and that is the tactile experience of working with one's tools and watching over your own shoulder as something comes into reality right before your eyes. A keyboard and trackball/mouse just doesn't hold a candle to fine tools. Fewer and fewer of us can have the joy of experiencing it.

How about the floor sticky from Spray Mount, an occasional bloody X-Acto blade, and rub down type. Plus that damn stat camera and half tone films....

spherical
10-04-2014, 07:42 PM
How about hand setting lead type and running a letterpress? Then phototype pasted on mechanicals with rubber cement? Hand stripping and then burning plates over an arc lamp? An Artograph projector?

SBowie
10-04-2014, 08:14 PM
Speaking of projectors, I've still got a 2 1/4" square projector in my closet. I must pull it out and check out some my big old Ektachromes one of these days.

shrox
10-04-2014, 08:19 PM
How about hand setting lead type and running a letterpress? Then phototype pasted on mechanicals with rubber cement? Hand stripping and then burning plates over an arc lamp? An Artograph projector?

I do not miss those days. Waxing, then hunting around for that missing letter that you later find stuck to your elbow.

I do missing sniffing mimeographs in school...

http://www.rednecklatte.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/What-a-buzz.jpg

safetyman
10-06-2014, 06:08 AM
OMG I'm old. Kids today would think you're crazy if you told them that you had to set type one letter at a time.

djwaterman
10-06-2014, 07:48 AM
http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif


yes, i think so too, surprisingly though, i might be going back "to the future"
as i'll probably be looking into more handcraft related work (as well)

but overall, 3D and 3D printers will "rule" the world... http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif



i remember btw in carpenter class at first we had to use the old tools, agh... that took time...

http://www.woodworkingplansdepot.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Woodworking-hand-tools.jpg

When I recently built my standing desk and had to sand and lacquer it down, I had a real sense of pleasure and pride at having produced something real, even the imperfections. I still think these old methods will be around for ages, as some people just get off on it and devote their lives to keeping the traditions going, it will become ultra cool to own something handcrafted.

kopperdrake
10-06-2014, 09:03 AM
French Curves

Ah - French Curves...<sigh>

And don't forget the new-fangled flexible curves! Won my first ever cover illustration competition at school using Eurostile Letraset for the type, bought in the bargain bin at our local graphic suppliers. Thought I was the bee's knees, using that modern stuff, coupled with a DeVilbiss airbrush I'd been 'leant' by my uncle (which I still have somewhere). Sweet memories :)

Riff_Masteroff
10-07-2014, 11:46 PM
Shellac . . . . . I still mix my own. Shells from the lac beetle dissolved in alcohol. That is . . . I purchase refined shellac flakes and buds from a one-up cooperative in California . . . dissolve them in alcohol at home, in my garage-workshop. Creates a beautiful, long lasting finish for woodworking projects. Recently, most of the house furniture, including stuff that I made thirty years ago, I have re-shellaced. The alcohol in the mix partly dissolves the old layer as the new one is being applied. In my opinion, the results are worth the time.

http://www.shellac.net/

Question: what melts in your mouth and not in your hand? Answer: sugar coated candies called M&Ms.
Question: what melts in your stomach and not in your mouth? Answer: Medicine prescribed by doctors, inside a capsule shaped shellac case.
Yes, shellac is Food & Drug Administration approved for human ingestion.

shrox
10-07-2014, 11:57 PM
Shellac . . . . . I still mix my own. Shells from the lac beetle dissolved in alcohol. That is . . . I purchase refined shellac flakes and buds from a one-up cooperative in California . . . dissolve them in alcohol at home, in my garage-workshop. Creates a beautiful, long lasting finish for woodworking projects. Recently, most of the house furniture, including stuff that I made thirty years ago, I have re-shellaced. The alcohol in the mix partly dissolves the old layer as the new one is being applied. In my opinion, the results are worth the time...

Sweet! A craftsman.

erikals
10-08-2014, 12:15 AM
looks beautiful http://erikalstad.com/backup/misc.php_files/smile.gif

http://forums.newtek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=124830&stc=1&thumb=1&d=1242103702

gerry_g
10-08-2014, 04:42 AM
while at art school in the late seventies I did the whole set type in a stick thing run a Heidelberg Platen press etc but what really impressed me was when the senior printers started talking about the old old days when scrolled embellishment round text was bent into shape and composed by hand from one point thick lead spacing and packed into position with blotting paper that had been soaked in urine and left to set hard, they told me there was always some disagreement over whose turn it was to piss in the bucket.

pauland
10-08-2014, 09:12 AM
As a child I used to sometimes buy sheets of letraset rub-off illustrations - usually on a theme - differrent comic characters, spacemen, etc. You could make your own scene.