PDA

View Full Version : Lighting a 1920s theater



ianay
09-20-2014, 07:07 AM
Ive modelled a 1920s movie theatre and i'm Trying to work out the best and most realistic way to light it (movie is not showing at time) the time from this theater ive built is 1929
cheers for all and any help

hazmat777
09-20-2014, 07:19 AM
Although this is probably not the look you are going for at the moment, I think this might give a different perspective on lighting a theater. Check out some of his photos when you get a chance.

Hiroshi Sugimoto

ianay
09-20-2014, 09:44 AM
Erm.. Ok
What Look?
Check out 'Who's' Photos?

hazmat777
09-20-2014, 10:12 AM
Erm.. Ok
What Look?
Check out 'Who's' Photos?

Hiroshi Sugimoto

Just Google his name and click on theater images.

ianay
09-20-2014, 10:33 AM
Cheers, They do look good.
With the screens pretty much lighting the room, but how to re-create that in Lightwave though?

hazmat777
09-20-2014, 10:40 AM
Cheers, They do look good.
With the screens pretty much lighting the room, but how to re-create that in Lightwave though?

Well, I'm no expert in time saving on renders, but I'm betting an area light from the front to fill the room and then IES lights for the ceiling lights and then some sphere lights around the corners of the ceiling. I'm sure someone will chime in with a better approach, but those are the first things that come to mind.

Cheers!
-Tom

vonpietro
09-20-2014, 01:31 PM
use fall off for your lights when you light, you'll get better results

jasonwestmas
09-20-2014, 04:19 PM
For light-bulbs try inverse square falloff that is really tiny (which means it will fall off a lot) but use 1million percent intensity. It looks more realistic.

Axis3d
09-21-2014, 05:56 PM
Also, make sure your colorspace is set to sRGB. Hit 'd' on the keyboard for your display settings, then on the CS tab, make sure that Quick Preset is set to sRGB. This will ensure a linear workflow and all of the calculations for lighting will look better (your shadows won't bunch up to black, your highlights won't get blown out).

chikega
09-23-2014, 07:21 PM
You could also make the screen object luminous and use Global Illumination.

Riff_Masteroff
09-23-2014, 08:13 PM
Theaters earlier than the 1920's were lit by candles . . . . many of them.

Ma3rk
09-25-2014, 07:36 AM
Theaters earlier than the 1920's were lit by candles . . . . many of them.

Ummm, gas actually. That's why there were so many theatre fires, why the proscenium curtain was often asbestos, and why the theatre industry in general was the first to adopted electric lighting.

hazmat777
09-25-2014, 11:24 AM
Ummm, gas actually. That's why there were so many theatre fires, why the proscenium curtain was often asbestos, and why the theatre industry in general was the first to adopted electric lighting.

Interesting! I didn't know that. So I wonder if those fires inspired the first on-site fire extinguishers ?

ianay
09-25-2014, 01:36 PM
Thanks for help guys..
This is what i've ended up with..
124498

Strange you should mention theater fires as this model is for local museum for the Glen Cinema in which a load of kids died back in New Years eve 1929, the worst cinema disaster in British history (dont think there's many rivals to be honest though)
All cos of some smoke which appeared at rear of the theater and kids thought it was a fire and made a mad rush for the exit..
71 children were killed in the crush that ensued..

spherical
09-25-2014, 02:25 PM
Sad story, indeed. As for the lighting, I'd suggest making it a lot warmer. Doesn't look like the 20's era to me, with a daylight color temperature.

hazmat777
09-25-2014, 02:42 PM
I really like it so far!

If you want to try some color try Googling "Seattle Cinerama". It's a really modern theater (it's an old theater it's just been renovated twice now), but might be helpful anyway. I kind of like the black and white-ish look you have going though. Maybe a hint of Sepia Tone would be good?

Ma3rk
09-25-2014, 11:44 PM
Interesting! I didn't know that. So I wonder if those fires inspired the first on-site fire extinguishers ?

Don't know about that particularly. A lot of movie theatres were simply converted stage houses and they had to line the booths with metal or similar non flammable material. The doors and lens ports were set up with cabling with lead links that would melt and seal it off in the event of a nitrate fire. Not a comforting thought if you were a projections back then.

Also, the term "in the limelight" comes from back then. Not that the foot lights were green but that they used a processed calcium carbonate (lime) as the gas source. Same thing coal miners used used before electric head lamps.

M.

hazmat777
09-26-2014, 09:53 AM
Don't know about that particularly. A lot of movie theatres were simply converted stage houses and they had to line the booths with metal or similar non flammable material. The doors and lens ports were set up with cabling with lead links that would melt and seal it off in the event of a nitrate fire. Not a comforting thought if you were a projections back then.

Also, the term "in the limelight" comes from back then. Not that the foot lights were green but that they used a processed calcium carbonate (lime) as the gas source. Same thing coal miners used used before electric head lamps.

M.

Although I'm familiar with the term "Limelight" (being a HUGE Rush fan and looking the term up after reading the song lyrics) the info about the lead links and nitrate fires is totally new to me. I imagine it was nerve racking to be a projectionist back then.