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View Full Version : update thought experiment for Lightwave



saranine
08-03-2014, 04:21 AM
Imagine if someone was new to Lightwave. They said "I will never upgrade until I have learned ALL the features in my Lightwave version?"

How many years would it be till they upgraded? Or how many months? Or years?

hrgiger
08-03-2014, 07:22 AM
Id say its not a very effective learning strategy at all. You learn the apsects of the software that you require for what you want to do with it. You upgrade when a newer release offers something you feel will be beneficial to your requirements.

Chernoby
08-03-2014, 10:05 AM
Id say its not a very effective learning strategy at all. You learn the apsects of the software that you require for what you want to do with it. You upgrade when a newer release offers something you feel will be beneficial to your requirements.

This is sage advice. A little more insight to any beginners out there: no one knows what their doing.

LW is like a music mixing panel. When one doesn't know what all the buttons, sliders, and levers are doing it is intimidating. When one knows what they do one realizes a professional mainly uses a small percentage of them just like an audio engineer really just uses volume and pan.

Research and branch out when one needs more options, absorb that knowledge till it is familiar, then keep widening one's skill base.

Above all keep experimenting.

jeric_synergy
08-03-2014, 11:47 AM
I agree, in this manner: Chazriker's posts about the (??? AFC) Assign functionality really opened my eyes. This is a neglected and rather buried functionality, easy to miss. So I very much agree that knowing what all the buttons do is crucial, even if one winds up using a quite restricted subset of them.

The double edged doorknob here is some functionality doesn't get well placed, or placed in the UI at all, so that's Bad. The other edge is, once users know about a tool they can place it prominently and conveniently, so that's Good.

Dan_Ritchie
08-03-2014, 02:25 PM
I worked full time in lightwave for almost 10 years and there are parts of the program I've never opened. There are parts I've opened and only just played with for a few minutes like skytracer 2 (which is awesome of course) but you just can't do everything when you have to do a job and get work done too. I've used lighwave since it was video scape, but I never build a skybox unti last week. I spent most of my time finding ways to make characters jump onto the back of giant bugs, animate dragons tied in chains or popping out of eggs, or finding creative ways to do something new with lens flares or lazy points, or jiggle dinosaur fat.

Shnoze Shmon
08-03-2014, 02:48 PM
I think a better question might be...

How many people have used, or know how to use, ALL of the tools in LightWave?

I've been trying to learn LightWave for 5 years now, and it still seems that every time I learn something new I discover 2-10 additional things I need to learn.

Sometimes the most staggering question I face is what to focus on learning next?

...and then there's all the stuff I need to relearn...

Information overload is a real problem.

jeric_synergy
08-03-2014, 10:17 PM
Information overload is a real problem.
I think documentation and reference is a real problem.

Been pitching, for years, documentation that COULD improve as time passes, instead of just staying static, i.e. not even having a chance of improving.



No matter HOW much effort a dedicated staffer or even a small group puts into the documentation, that effort pales in comparison to the amount of useful help we see here on the forum.

There will always be omissions and errata-- which could address them faster-- one overworked staffer, or a mob of LW devotees?

There will be explanations that just don't work very well-- a crowd could supply several alternative explanations.

There are features that go wanting for examples: who can make more, one person, or a flock of users?

There exist video tutorials, freely available: who can link to them quickly?

Just sayin'.

Lightwave's ace in the hole nowadays is not its tech, it's its COMMUNITY. But the community is not being used as well as it could be. All this help and know-how on the forum, on YouTube, on various websites and blogs, is too hard to find in a timely, asynchronous manner. Dealing with the information overflow, at the low funding level$ LW3dG seems to be capable of, requires a new strategy.

Centralized, moderated, crowd-based, and evolving.