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View Full Version : How many NASA artists do we have here? Why aren't we a union!



shrox
06-18-2014, 05:10 PM
Just joking about the union part. I am curious, how many forum members have done imagery for NASA?

spherical
06-18-2014, 05:13 PM
+1 a lot. Here's my avatar on other forums:
122446

ernpchan
06-18-2014, 05:16 PM
I know of a handful of artists that do NASA/JPL work who aren't on the forum.

shrox
06-18-2014, 05:18 PM
+1 a lot. Here's my avatar on other forums:
122446

Cool, I saw your reentry pic and that's what started me wondering. It seems like NASA artists don't really know of each other.

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I know of a handful of artists that do NASA/JPL work who aren't on the forum.

Why aren't we having more parties then?

spherical
06-18-2014, 06:02 PM
It seems like NASA artists don't really know of each other.

We do; just not here. I worked primarily in traditional acrylic media for years, 3 paintings in the NASA Smithsonian Collection plus a lot more for NASA HQ and JPL, prior to catching the 3D bug. Most still work only in traditional media. Not a lot can make the transition, but it sure helps the outcome in 3D if you have a rich background in doing an image from the ground up without an undo. The large majority of my space imagery is in traditional media; these are painted by hand with a brush:
122448 122451 122452 122453 122450
Most are in the 30"x40" range but the fifth is 26 feet long on a continuous sheet of canvas.

shrox
06-18-2014, 06:18 PM
We do; just not here. I worked primarily in traditional acrylic media for years, 3 paintings in the NASA Smithsonian Collection plus a lot more for NASA HQ and JPL, prior to catching the 3D bug. Most still work only in traditional media. Not a lot can make the transition, but it sure helps the outcome in 3D if you have a rich background in doing an image from the ground up without an undo. The large majority of my space imagery is in traditional media; these are painted by hand with a brush:
122448 122451 122452 122453 122450
Most are in the 30"x40" range but the fifth is 26 feet long on a continuous sheet of canvas.

I used to paint and draw, Robert McCall was a big influence on me. I used to hope to have a painting on the cover of Omni magazine, but by the time I was ready, the magazine was long gone.

Undo changed everything, and I got soft...I don't have a since piece from then.

spherical
06-18-2014, 07:05 PM
My first what I consider to be a "real", in the sense of being worthy, painting is in Markers and India Ink; yes, that's right, 20"x30" on illustration board. Produced for the US Bicentennial. I still have the original:
122454 Now signed by Dr. Buzz Aldrin.

Most recent acrylic on canvas. 1 year of research. Part of a triptych, Now in a private collection:
122455
The third painting being the ball resting in the crater that it created, capped by the dust that followed it all the way there. I'm here to tell ya' that that ball was a ******. AND I painted it TWICE. Just prior to shipping the originals, I uncovered data that corrected what was commonly thought to be written on the ball, so I tried to modify it. The illusion of the ball slowly eroded away and completely doing it over was the only choice. Talk about not having UnDo or SaveAs... rewarding, just the same; perhaps moreso.
122458

shrox
06-18-2014, 07:11 PM
My first what I consider to be a "real", in the sense of being worthy, painting is in Markers and India Ink; yes, that's right, 20"x30" on illustration board. Produced for the US Bicentennial. I still have the original:
122454 Now signed by Dr. Buzz Aldrin.

Most recent acrylic on canvas. 1 year of research. Part of a triptych, Now in a private collection:
122455
The third painting being the ball resting in the crater that it created, capped by the dust that followed it all the way there. I'm here to tell ya' that that ball was a ******. AND I painted it TWICE. Just prior to shipping the originals, I uncovered data that corrected what was commonly thought to be written on the ball, so I tried to modify it. The illusion of the ball slowly eroded away and completely doing it over was the only choice. Talk about not having UnDo or SaveAs... rewarding, just the same; perhaps moreso.
122458

That second one is quite nice. I did mostly pen and ink, colored pencils and watercolor, "real" painting was just not fun for me, I'd would get too stressed.

spherical
06-18-2014, 07:26 PM
What I found was that, because my painting is realistic, I would paint myself into a box canyon because I hadn't thought far enough into and through the process before commencing. I'd get to a point and then realize I should have turned left instead of right about four steps back. That, or I realize that the view would be better from a viewpoint about 2 to the right and a bit higher. You're stuck with it & make do or you start over. Now, changes are easy in comparison. Just like getting special effects in the camera instead of in post; which I used to do, too. Very rewarding when you pull it off.

safetyman
06-19-2014, 05:42 AM
I used to do NASA imagery years ago when I worked at Stennis Space Center. Mostly Earth-science related things but that's the job that really got me to learn Lightwave. I'd travel around the country with one of their big convention displays and was responsible for not only the images that accompanied the displays, but also putting the units together. I did a huge display for the Lewis & Clark anniversary that used to reside at a museum near their west-coast destination, but I don't know if it's still there or not. I have some stories to tell with that job. :)