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View Full Version : Tim Jenison on how Vermeer may have created a 17th Century form of color photography



Chuck
06-11-2014, 11:29 AM
Tim Jenison talks about the process of testing out how Vermeer may have invented a 17th century answer to color photography: http://boingboing.net/2014/06/10/vermeers-paintings-might-be.html

OnlineRender
06-11-2014, 12:48 PM
Tim Jenison talks about the process of testing out how Vermeer may have invented a 17th century answer to color photography: http://boingboing.net/2014/06/10/vermeers-paintings-might-be.html

bought my copy last night ... hopefully it will get here soon tell Tim commission on this sale should goto Philip Nelson :D

ernpchan
06-11-2014, 12:53 PM
The amount of work Tim went through for this experiment is amazing. Such dedication.

JBT27
06-11-2014, 03:23 PM
Very impressive and intensive work, and fascinating. But I can't help thinking there might be that chance that Vermeer just happened to have a particular talent for such images :)

Julian.

SBowie
06-11-2014, 03:36 PM
Tempting, but .... if you've seen the video, you'll know there are a few things that lend added weight to the general theory. In particular, several little quirks in the modern day result turned out to be attributable to unforeseen effects of using optics. On inspection, the same oddities were found to exist in the original work as well. This, I admit, sways me.

Chuck
06-11-2014, 05:13 PM
I've known quite a few people to assert that they know people who can paint exactly what they see, and another person looking at the scene and the image will indeed feel as though they are seeing a photoreal picture. I'm sure that's very possible. I certainly believe a very talented human being could be able to paint the human perception of the scene. What convinces me of Vermeer's use of technology is that painting the human perception of the scene is not, to close analysis, what Vermeer did. He painted, rather, essentially a camera receptor image of the scene, long before there were cameras. Tim Jenison figured out one way that could be done with the available technology of Vermeer's day.

Again, what Vermeer painted, when analyzed with modern tools, was not the human perception of the scene. The alternative to using the assistance of technology to paint in a way the human eye and visual processing centers are not capable of working, is that he was in fact painting what he saw. If he painted what he saw, then his perceptual apparatus was not human, which would mean he was not a human being. Which is more likely? Vermeer using technology, or Vermeer the robot with camera sensor eyes, Vermeer the mutant, Vermeer the alien?

Danner
06-12-2014, 07:50 AM
My vote is on time traveler :D

Chuck
06-12-2014, 08:30 AM
My vote is on time traveler :D


I think you just pitched a new TV series premise. :)

Phil
06-12-2014, 12:01 PM
Tim needs to add his LW stuff to the content for the next release :D

JBT27
06-12-2014, 12:13 PM
Tempting, but .... if you've seen the video, you'll know there are a few things that lend added weight to the general theory. In particular, several little quirks in the modern day result turned out to be attributable to unforeseen effects of using optics. On inspection, the same oddities were found to exist in the original work as well. This, I admit, sways me.

Yep, fair point. In this case the evidence is objective, and arguably overwhelming. I worry sometimes that art historians are talking up what an artist was thinking and doing, when in truth they may have little evidence to support that; but this is different, I agree.

Julian.

BeeVee
06-13-2014, 03:42 AM
I've watched it twice now thanks to Film Four OD (3.99) and it's a brilliant 77 minutes. I sent Graham a Skype message asking for his autograph now he's a film star... :D I shall definitely get it on Blu-Ray too...

B

BeeVee
06-13-2014, 03:57 AM
Yep, fair point. In this case the evidence is objective, and arguably overwhelming. I worry sometimes that art historians are talking up what an artist was thinking and doing, when in truth they may have little evidence to support that; but this is different, I agree.

Julian.

Objective is an adjective that gets used several times in the documentary. Tim goes as far as to say that the work he's putting in is almost drudgery rather than artistry (I'm paraphrasing :)).

B

pinkmouse
06-13-2014, 04:05 AM
I've watched it twice now thanks to Film Four OD

Good, that means it might be on Freeview sometime soon.

BeeVee
06-13-2014, 04:14 AM
On the FilmFour channel? I don't think so yet, there are a whole bunch of films on their site that have not been shown on TV, and this is pretty new. Did it even come out at the flicks in Blighty?

Spend the four quid. It's a great documentary and the nice thing with FilmFour in comparison with the likes of netflix is that you don't pay a subscription. I always choose to download rather than stream from the site because although I'm on FTTH fibre optic here and can get 15MB/s download, because I have to run through a VPN that gets throttled immensely and the stream stutters permanently.

B

OnlineRender
06-15-2014, 05:13 PM
I've watched it twice now thanks to Film Four OD (3.99)



Damn wish I had known that would have saved me a tenner.... anyway

I must say it's f**king brilliant, I actually nearly had a man tear at the end but then I remembered I was Glaswegian.

the dedication -time & passion that went into this project was simply amazing and I actually think Tim's theory is pretty damn solid I have a lot of respect for Tim... he really is a modern day genius!

ernpchan
06-19-2014, 10:50 AM
I just watched this last night. The amount of time and work that Tim put into this was mind boggling. To have to tediously paint everyday like that was frightening.

What I wanna know if how many feature requests Tim had while using LW. :D

There should be a profile piece on his use of LW for this project. I bet it would be a fascinating read, especially since it's his product.

cagey5
06-19-2014, 01:08 PM
Damn wish I had known that would have saved me a tenner.... anyway

I must say it's f**king brilliant, I actually nearly had a man tear at the end but then I remembered I was Glaswegian.

the dedication -time & passion that went into this project was simply amazing and I actually think Tim's theory is pretty damn solid I have a lot of respect for Tim... he really is a modern day genius!

It's also available on Blinkbox in the UK for 3.49 to rent, or 9.99 to buy. Not watched it yet as I'm not signed up. Hopefully it will turn up on Netflix.

pinkmouse
06-22-2014, 05:16 PM
Not there yet. I signed up for the free trial after I saw it listed on the US site, but not currently available on Netflix UK. I am enjoying various episodes of Mythbusters though. :D

shrox
06-22-2014, 10:23 PM
I am often half amazed and half "what did you expect" from stuff like this. I think the ingenuity of clever means of accomplishing something is often overlooked and underestimated.