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View Full Version : How Lightwave was used in The Conjuring



Mr Rid
05-14-2014, 07:21 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avKFuJc2nzQ

jhinrichs
05-14-2014, 08:12 PM
I think this was one of the better horror movies made in the past 20 years. The subtle effects like you showed in the video definitely helped the atmosphere. I'd Much rather see an effect like the syflex ghost then buckets of CGI gore raining on the camera.

ernpchan
05-14-2014, 08:31 PM
Awesome breakdown. Without it I would never have known what was the 3d element.

jasonwestmas
05-14-2014, 08:36 PM
really cool! thanks Mr. Rid, makes me want to do video FX.

vector
05-14-2014, 11:49 PM
Always suscribed to any Mr Rid's thread. Thank you so much

prometheus
05-14-2014, 11:50 PM
Nice information the Mr Rid, thanks.
Now I need to catch that flick somehow.

Lewis
05-15-2014, 12:34 AM
great work and cool breakdown and as Ernest said it's really hard to say it's 3D so that says it even more how good this work is :).

allabulle
05-15-2014, 07:35 AM
Yes, great work!

pauland
05-15-2014, 07:41 AM
Really impressive. Far more impressive than in the in-your-face stuff, screaming 'child of CG' that we see so often.

Kaptive
05-15-2014, 08:57 AM
Really impressive. Far more impressive than in the in-your-face stuff, screaming 'child of CG' that we see so often.

Like this kind of thing?

http://i57.tinypic.com/2iqz8cy.jpg

*sigh*

pauland
05-15-2014, 09:20 AM
LOL.

I don't mind the obvious stuff, but how much better is it when people just can't tell if it's real or not?

It must be the ultimate compliment to work on a CG project and have nobody know it was done.

Nicolas Jordan
05-15-2014, 11:35 AM
Very nice effects work!

Mr Rid
05-15-2014, 12:22 PM
Yeah, creatures roaring into the lens is one of the most wearisome, overused CG cliche's. I think it started with The Mummy. Every movie and trailer with a monster has to have it.

kadri
05-15-2014, 04:53 PM
Very nice!
Mr Rid i like you breakdowns about using Lightwave in movies for VFX.
How was it in this movie?
What was the hardest part in this one for example?

erikals
05-15-2014, 05:27 PM
those pigeons, they seem to have a conspiracy...

spherical
05-15-2014, 05:56 PM
Reminds me of reading about the effects crew on CE3K that submitted footage for an Oscar for Special Effects and the committee turned it down and sent it back; saying that it must have been a mistake, they couldn't find any effects to judge. It was the helicopters flying near Devil's Tower. As far as I'm concerned, THEY WIN!.

SaleVonGeist
05-15-2014, 06:02 PM
Great work, very inspiring! :bowdown:

Axis3d
05-15-2014, 06:09 PM
As usual, great work.

Oedo 808
05-15-2014, 06:10 PM
Excellent standard, I really like the polish of the finished work you do.

Mr Rid
05-15-2014, 07:45 PM
Very nice!
...
What was the hardest part in this one for example?

Well, the sheet shot was the most difficult shot I ever worked on, but that was just because the old version of Syflex I was using did not allow for any values to be keyframed (now it does). So it was a nightmare getting the sheet to flip and cover the window on a particular frame. I needed to manually change wind, gravity, cloth properties and collisions on various frames, and follow a list that changed dozens of times. I ran over 70 sims trying to get it right. They also shot a live version with an actor behind a sheet on wires, that of course was not working. Early on, I was concerned with getting the same translucent shadow that comes thru a sheet with an object behind it. I could not find any subsurface setting that would get the same effect, but I was able to stick with more straightforward surfacing.

I barely got away with using the Daz pigeon model which is rather low rez. If it was not continuously obscured by motion blur, I would have had to acquire, modify and texture a more detailed model. I was impressed at how convincingly the live puppet pigeon moved, but it could not hit the chair, or flop the way the director wanted. I was supposed to replace it thru the whole shot, but I saved some work by transitioning under cover of moblur as it flipped over, since they were ok with the way the puppet behaved on the floor. I did earlier versions of the animation where the pigeon thrashed around more.

Most people complain when a client is not sure what they want, but its ok to me if they are open to the ideas of the creative people they hire. I like the chance to come up with my own ideas, like with the Specter. R&D didnt get far with that before the director probably realized the same thing I did, that 'less was more.' Other artists were submitting versions too, but an elaborate FX thingy was just too distracting. The people I work with trust me to come up with different, interesting looks. I experimented with some FX R&D on a sequence in Insidious 2, but that was also never used, where again, less was more. But I like tackling the thing that no one is sure how it will work, thinking diagonally, pulling quick and dirty 'cheats.'
121905

Some artists grumble when things are not clear cut, but its an organic process, where some ideas work, while others evolve thru collaboration and creative problem solving, and then some things just dont work. Restrictions inspire creativity, no director can anticipate exactly how every detail will work out, and I appreciate when they put faith in the creative people they hire (some very talented artists I know would rather be told exactly what to do), and they dont micromanage, and they communicate well with the artists and challenge them. It only stinks when an ego keeps trying to beat a dead horse with more iterations, nitpicking details that dont matter, blaming others when it is apparent that the concept was just never thought thru well, and may need to be compromised or cut. But that is the kind of situation

The pigeon and locket shots were manually tracked, using some of my wacky matchmoving tricks- http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?94121-Matchmoving-in-Lightwave

Juan Vargas created the chair, shattered glass and crucifix, and I consider him one of the top artists I ever worked with. He is a brilliant generalist who excels in every aspect of animation/VFX. I am glad he is breaking out of the limited world of VFX, and began writing and directing his own features. I will probably be working for him soon.

kadri
05-15-2014, 08:54 PM
Thanks for the detailed answer Mr Rid.
I remember the link and it was bookmarked already in the case i need it :)

chikega
05-15-2014, 09:42 PM
Very nice effects, breakdowns and explanation of the process! :)

safetyman
05-16-2014, 05:25 AM
Brilliant work. Thanks for sharing with us.

Waves of light
05-16-2014, 05:58 AM
Superb as always. Thanks again for your insights. Hope to see more when you start working with Juan.

lardbros
05-16-2014, 06:08 AM
Same as everyone else here... always subscribe to Mr Rid's work... fantastic showcase of your talents as an artist!

How long did you have for some of those shots? For instance, the crucifix one, or the smashing windows etc?

Ryan Roye
05-16-2014, 07:47 AM
Thanks so much for the insight on production!


Some artists grumble when things are not clear cut, but its an organic process, where some ideas work, while others evolve thru collaboration and creative problem solving, and then some things just dont work.

I'm guilty of this and have done it a lot in the past. From my experience, things get a lot easier when one develops fast and effective ways to communicate otherwise vague, or not-so-well established ideas in a way that the client(s) can understand. IE: If the client isn't sure on the exact shade of color, it isn't hard to re-color something, put letters over each color, and ask "which one do you think works best?". Granted, knowing a little bit about compositing helps quite a bit!

ary3d
05-16-2014, 03:04 PM
Amazing work!

Mr Rid
05-17-2014, 06:33 PM
How long did you have for some of those shots? For instance, the crucifix one, or the smashing windows etc?

I dont know, Juan Vargas did those shots. Its usually hard for me to say how long each shot took since I normally switch between working on different shots while waiting for the next approval on each aspect of each shot. The work may pause for some days while waiting to hear from the director who is already busy working on their next project. I may be told to start or stop, or that the shot was cut from the edit.

Davewriter
05-17-2014, 07:25 PM
Thanks for the talk through!
It's nice hearing that you don't always need the brand new, glittery Mark 10 to get a shot done.
Sometimes cleverness (and a Daz pigeon) is all you need :)

lardbros
05-18-2014, 02:09 AM
Ah, okay... Sorry!
Guess it's difficult to gauge time spent on a shot when you're chopping and changing!

Great work though... Love seeing your stuff! :)