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View Full Version : UK use of "zed" and "zee": WUWT?



jeric_synergy
05-11-2014, 11:23 AM
So, just watched two videos from a couple UK'ers: RebelHill and the guy from Nott College.

Personally, I've always enjoyed the fact that our brothers from the various Commonwealths and whatnot use "zed"-- so sick of Americana globally. But of these two UK'ers, RH uses "zed" and the other fellow uses "zee".

What's Up With That? (WUWT?) Is there a 'rule' about who uses "zee" (the Welsh perhaps?) and who uses "zed"? :stumped:

:D

Slartibartfast
05-11-2014, 12:11 PM
For a guy like me, not having English as my native language, I'd prefer if they would stick to "zed". At least in the tutorials, because otherwise I only hear "C" which makes no sense in some cases and I think about it intensely for a couple of seconds before realizing that he ment "Z". Next thing I realize is that I didn't hear anything he said after that so then I have to rewind those seconds and watch it all again. :D

jeric_synergy
05-11-2014, 01:09 PM
YEAH! "Zed" is unambiguous. Let's make it a Lightwave "thing"!

Skonk
05-12-2014, 03:09 AM
I almost always use "zed"; but if referencing a product with a Z in the name, it makes sense to use the way the company who made the product say it... you know.. cos it's a name.

So I will generally say "zee brush" but that's about the only time I'd use it.

If a brit is using "zee" for things like "zee axis" and so on then I'd suggest that person has just been heavily influence by watching US based training or something.

kopperdrake
05-12-2014, 04:09 AM
Dear heaven's above no! It is always 'Zed' in the UK unless, as Skonk points out, it's someone who had been influenced by too much US exposure and tries to make themselves sound 'cooler' by using it. A Briton using 'zee' is as cool as an American using 'Quid' for a 'Pound' (that lady on Four Rooms for example - I cringe every time she says 'I'll give you two thousand quid" - emphasis on 'quid' for some reason). It just grates on the ears - and makes you look desperate to be something you're not. I love the American accent, but when my daughter comes home and every sentence goes up at the end, we just mimic her into submission - on a Derbyshire accent it sounds ridiculous :D

Tell me - do you get American children having any influence from watching too much Railway Children? ;)

RebelHill
05-12-2014, 05:00 AM
Its zed in all english speaking countries save the US whom like to be contrary...

I always say, that in all matters Anglic... defer to the bard... "Thou whoreson Zed, thou unneccessary letter!"

BokadCastle
05-12-2014, 07:26 AM
I say zed...unless it's obviously zee.

Mr_Q
05-12-2014, 09:52 AM
I prefer the UKs terminology for various car words as they simply make more sense. Boot, hood, bonnet, estate, saloon, coupe, and of course, without a doubt, their pronunciation of "aluminum." How we are taught to say it in the states is absurdly more difficult to say.

However I hate "zed." It sounds silly. ;)

jeric_synergy
05-12-2014, 10:07 AM
Blimey, someone needs to get over to West Nott and sort that bloke out! ;)

As an unabashed Anglophile, I urge EVERYBODY, even Q, but especially all UKers and Commonwealth folk, to stick with "zed". It's just cooler.

(However, Old Bill was wrong: no other letter has the buzzy sound of zed. Bees would be mute without it.)

(Always appreciated it when the Canadian character on "Stargate:Atlantis" used "zed point module" in the face of the Yankee crowd around him.)

EDIT: kopperdrake, I once met a woman who used a fake British accent virtually continuously. In an adult, it's rather pathetic. Innit? ;) --BTW, when I visited London, was appalled at the number of Americans there, we're a freekin' plague.

OTOH, you guys DO have SUCH great colloquial expressions!

Waves of light
05-12-2014, 10:25 AM
It's the whole Nike vs Nike (pronoused Nikee now, apparently). 'Zed' all day in the UK, thank you sir. My poor old dad goes nuts whenever one of my children use 'movie' or 'missile' in a sentence.... which is usually followed by "it's a film" or "it's a rocket". Think he's worried the US is going to take over the world :D

jeric_synergy
05-12-2014, 10:34 AM
Isn't Nike a Greek word?

Waves of light
05-12-2014, 10:42 AM
Yes, wasn't she the greek goddess of speed?

jeric_synergy
05-12-2014, 11:00 AM
Perhaps (lmgtfy), but my point was : what other pronunciation was being used? "NYYYK"?

NII-KEE conforms to that Greek thing where the final "e" gets pronounced.

JohnMarchant
05-12-2014, 11:14 AM
Nike was a close friend of Athena a Greek Goddess in Mythology.

http://www.theoi.com/Daimon/Nike.html

Probably does not matter in the case of the USA, from what ive heard American English will be a minority language in 30 years time.

mike_stening
05-12-2014, 11:20 AM
pronunciation of NIKE always bugs me, the spelling denotes that the "I" should be pronounced by its name and not its phonetic sound and as there's no extra 'e' on the end then it doesn't get and extra mention. though that never bothered the Greeks.
oh and beta is said Beetah not bayta, pfff ;)

jeric_synergy
05-12-2014, 11:21 AM
Used only by air-traffic controllers, perhaps. --I am fully expecting Mandarin or Cantonese to take over.

jeric_synergy
05-12-2014, 11:25 AM
pronunciation of NIKE always bugs me, the spelling denotes that the "I" should be pronounced by its name and not its phonetic sound and as there's no extra 'e' on the end then it doesn't get and extra mention. though that never bothered the Greeks.
Yeah, like here, my favorite Muse-- found I'd been mispronouncing her name all these years:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terpsichore

The Greeks loved their trailing Es.

Slartibartfast
05-12-2014, 11:33 AM
Used only by air-traffic controllers, perhaps. --I am fully expecting Mandarin or Cantonese to take over.

Great, then I don't have to speak Mandarin at work :D (Nothing wrong with Mandarin I guess, except I don't know it)

Waves of light
05-12-2014, 11:34 AM
Perhaps (lmgtfy), but my point was : what other pronunciation was being used? "NYYYK"?

NII-KEE conforms to that Greek thing where the final "e" gets pronounced.

Nike is pronounced the same as bike.


Nike was a close friend of Athena a Greek Goddess in Mythology.

http://www.theoi.com/Daimon/Nike.html

Probably does not matter in the case of the USA, from what ive heard American English will be a minority language in 30 years time.

10 years from now, we'll all be speaking 'text' - lol, gr8, cult8r

bobakabob
05-12-2014, 11:52 AM
Dear heaven's above no! It is always 'Zed' in the UK unless, as Skonk points out, it's someone who had been influenced by too much US exposure and tries to make themselves sound 'cooler' by using it. A Briton using 'zee' is as cool as an American using 'Quid' for a 'Pound' (that lady on Four Rooms for example - I cringe every time she says 'I'll give you two thousand quid" - emphasis on 'quid' for some reason). It just grates on the ears - and makes you look desperate to be something you're not. I love the American accent, but when my daughter comes home and every sentence goes up at the end, we just mimic her into submission - on a Derbyshire accent it sounds ridiculous :D

Tell me - do you get American children having any influence from watching too much Railway Children? ;)

Yep, ZedBrush in the UK. You'd get a few funny looks up here in the North if you used "ZeeBrush"... probably accompanied by a response like "Whatyeronabowt? Yer not from round 'eer!"

cagey5
05-12-2014, 12:51 PM
I always liked them, there, zed zed top.

jeric_synergy
05-12-2014, 01:01 PM
Nike is pronounced the same as bike.
Yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh no.

Wikipedia
"In Greek mythology, Nike (Greek: Νίκη, "Victory", pronounced [nǐːkɛː]) "

Also: http://www.pantheon.org/miscellaneous/pronunciations.html

Unless, of course, you refer to your velocipede as a "bikeey".

djwaterman
05-12-2014, 01:13 PM
Zed, Z, say it any way you want.

Mr_Q
05-12-2014, 01:30 PM
Many here pronounce missile "Missal." THAT bugs me. :)

Dexter2999
05-12-2014, 02:05 PM
Many here pronounce missile "Missal." THAT bugs me. :)

For me, it is "al-you-mini-um" instead of aluminum.

cagey5
05-12-2014, 02:11 PM
To be fair. It is spelt (yeah I know) aluminIum and not alumiNUM

well at least that's how most spell it ;)

Tobian
05-12-2014, 02:22 PM
Technically it's Aluminium by international agreement, though the American aloooooooooooominum is apparently an 'acceptable alternative', and because Americans don't like being wrong I guess :D I was once made a bet with an American living over here that I was dead wrong about my pronunciation... I am still waiting on that pint... :)

I guess it's really hard to not bow to international conventions on things. I think I've always heard it 'said' zeee brush, and probably heard it said before I visited their company website. If the company internally refers to it's self as such I'd probably refer to it, because you should respect how people prefer to pronounce their own names... Though, Scarlett Johansson, learn how to say your name properly :D

Since I've watched American Telly pretty much since being small, it's sometimes hard to know a word isn't actually 'English', since it's used interchangeably for the English version.

With luck this Anglophilia will spread, and I will no longer have to read color or math *shudders* :D

- - - Updated - - -

NB: Cagey it is actually spelled as it is pronounced in America, though if used in a chemistry context, it really should be said in the international style.

cagey5
05-12-2014, 02:25 PM
Likewise if I refer to Lightwave Modeler I spell it as the company designates, but if I refer to being a modeller, I of course default to standard UK spelling.

pauland
05-12-2014, 03:17 PM
As a Brit, I know of no other Brit that uses Zee in preference to Zed, except when adressing a transatlantic audience.

I do have an exception, though - ZZ Top is definitely ZeeZee.

Tranimatronic
05-12-2014, 03:36 PM
I am from England, live in Vancouver and work for a US based company.
In meetings with our US office, I make a big deal of saying ZED-brush.
It's quite comical how many of my US-based colleagues leave meetings referring to it as ZED-brush too.
It's also funny that when they try to do an English accent they often do an impression of Dick VanDyke doing an impression of and English accent. believing that's how we all talk.
oh well ;)

The English guy saying 'ZEE' is obviously an impostor....

shrox
05-12-2014, 04:02 PM
...The English guy saying 'ZEE' is obviously an impostor....

Good to know...

jeric_synergy
05-12-2014, 04:14 PM
The English guy saying 'ZEE' is obviously an impostor....
Have at him: he goes by "tonyhall007" on YouTube:



https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOGX6SYo_DxLZfrWQHemrCA

The one where I caught him saying "zee" ( quelle horreur!!! ;) ) was a nice little tute on constructing a low-poly fish in LWM. I believe he teaches a beginning LW class at West Notts College.

EDIT: ahhhhhh, "West Notts" seems to be a colloquialism for "West Nottinghamshire College". Like "Wazzu" for my alma mater.

BokadCastle
05-12-2014, 04:43 PM
...and what about "Z cars" - um, that's with a zed!

Geez, I'm ancient.

spherical
05-12-2014, 04:48 PM
Ok, so what is said when reciting the alphabet?

jeric_synergy
05-12-2014, 04:53 PM
"Zed".

BTW, wasn't "Zed" the name of the titular protagonist of "A Wizard of Earthsea"? That's like being named "Omega".

spherical
05-12-2014, 05:03 PM
And the other letters? In keeping, they should be cited using the NATO Phonetic Alphabet: "Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot..." or similar, just so there's no ambiguity.

pinkmouse
05-12-2014, 05:08 PM
People actually say Zee Brush? How quaint. :)

Oh, and a missile is any object with a ballistic trajectory, hence the more correct term, guided missile. A rocket is a self powered missile.

BokadCastle
05-12-2014, 05:11 PM
And the other letters? In keeping, they should be cited using the NATO Phonetic Alphabet: "Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot..." or similar, just so there's no ambiguity.

so what's zed then - used to be 'zulu'.

Tranimatronic
05-12-2014, 05:36 PM
People actually say Zee Brush? How quaint. :)

Whats more quaint is their mispronunciation of a popular english swear word.
I still fall around laughing when someone calls me a "TWOT". It has neither the comedy or venom you can instill in the English way of saying it.

stiff paper
05-12-2014, 05:49 PM
I lived in California for many years. Back in the North of England now. Sometimes, without meaning to, I say "Zee". Figure I'm allowed. Sometimes I look at my fuel gauge and say "I need gas." Usually I correct myself. Maybe the Notts College chappie spent some time in the USA?


...hood, bonnet...
I've had several arguments with people in LA that go along the lines of:
"Bonnet! Dude, how is it a bonnet? A bonnet is what a baby girl wears."
"Really. And what, exactly, does the word 'Hood' mean when it isn't on a car?"
"Uh..."


"aluminum."
I wonder if it was Webster who changed the spelling of aluminium? I bet it was, the dog brained oaf. Making a language easier to spell makes it less interesting, or, in other words, worse. He didn't change the spelling of anything else in the Periodic Table that ends "-ium." Probably because he was too thick to know all those other things existed.


Many here pronounce missile "Missal." THAT bugs me. :)
Hah! Ask them how to spell it. I've had that argument, too. The people who say "Missle" usually insist there's no second "i".

probiner
05-12-2014, 05:49 PM
Since It's not my mother language and most tutorials I saw including William Vaughn and Larry (I could be wrong) I use Zee all the time :D
Also in portuguese Z reads like ZÍ so it's easier to fallback to Zee.

Zed only for this guy, ehehe
http://static.comicvine.com/uploads/original/1/15317/960774-zedd2.jpg

Did sound new first time I listened in on a english tut vid.

jeric_synergy
05-12-2014, 05:54 PM
Maybe "aluminum" was a typo, but someone was too embarrassed to admit it.

I'd sure like to visit the UK in the summer. And I'm from Seattle, so I have low expectations, sun-wise.

stiff paper
05-12-2014, 06:02 PM
The etymology of "Aluminum" is much more convoluted than I suggested:
http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/aluminium.htm
(Only of interest if this is the kind of nerdy thing you like to read about! Otherwise, kinda boring.)

geo_n
05-12-2014, 08:43 PM
Nissan Fairlady Zed. Its not called Nissan Fairlady Zee. :D
Zee sounds weeny. :D

shrox
05-12-2014, 11:41 PM
I hope no one says "sod" for "c".

djwaterman
05-13-2014, 12:09 AM
Both pronunciations Zee or Zed are absolutely correct, so use whatever regardless of your place of birth, what ever works for you, don't get stuck on convention.

spherical
05-13-2014, 03:25 AM
What he said.

What I really want to know is, what about: "dATTah" and "dAYtuh"?

BeeVee
05-13-2014, 05:08 AM
...and the fact that in either pronunciation, it's a plural word. The singular is datum. :) And for further mispronunciation, how do you say the chewy sweets made of toffee? Carmel, like your town or ca-ra-mel? :)

B

Kaptive
05-13-2014, 07:29 AM
Xeno... zeeno, zeno, X... hmmm. What nutter created this barbaric language?

jeric_synergy
05-13-2014, 08:18 AM
At least we got "My Fair Lady" out of the deal.

JohnMarchant
05-13-2014, 08:25 AM
Have to admit the one thing that does annoy me is when some say I-Raq or I-Ran as if it were two words.

jeric_synergy
05-13-2014, 08:55 AM
wuturyoo, sumkinda EYE Talian?

art
05-13-2014, 09:17 AM
I'm probably in the minority, but I always wrongly assumed softimage is pronounced with an English accent. Then one day in some online video I've heard it pronounced with a French accent. That was a bit unexpected for me :)

JohnMarchant
05-13-2014, 10:51 AM
Yeah forgot that one.

dirtydog
05-13-2014, 11:03 AM
It's the whole Nike vs Nike (pronoused Nikee now, apparently). 'Zed' all day in the UK, thank you sir. My poor old dad goes nuts whenever one of my children use 'movie' or 'missile' in a sentence.... which is usually followed by "it's a film" or "it's a rocket". Think he's worried the US is going to take over the world :D
'Zed' all day in the UK, but not with the letter J, in England its pronounced JAY and in scotland its pronounced JI.

jeric_synergy
05-13-2014, 06:53 PM
"JI" -never knew that. --I always liked the German "ABCs", especially H thru P.

And Softmage was from Toronto, right? So it's always been "Softimaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaj". SO French!

shrox
05-13-2014, 08:52 PM
How is "Z" pronounced on "Wheel of Fortune" in the UK?

probiner
05-13-2014, 10:52 PM
I'm probably in the minority, but I always wrongly assumed softimage is pronounced with an English accent. Then one day in some online video I've heard it pronounced with a French accent. That was a bit unexpected for me :)

https://vimeo.com/35768570

ahahah :D

DarkLane
05-15-2014, 02:54 AM
I use "zed" on Mondays, Tuesdays Wednesdays and Weekends, days with Quarter Moons and Full Moons, and paydays. I use "Zee" for the other days of the week and statutory holidays that begin with "W" (Not many of those).
Works for me and I can play the "International GlobeTrotter" card... :)