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View Full Version : Building a PC, what do I need.



djwaterman
03-14-2014, 02:26 AM
Actually I won't be building it, but I will get the guy at the shop to do it. I want to spend about 1.5 grand or less if possible and want to know what are the main components or specs I should be asking for.

The only thing i know for sure is I definitely want to go with Nvidia and not Radeon for the G'card.

I'm looking for a shopping list of things like Ram size, hard drive and all that stuff I normally don't want to think about.

It is for Lightwave, After Effects and other graphic and editing programs, that's the usage requirement for the machine. Any advice would be appreciated right now.

If there is anything pre-built on the market that users would recommend I'll look at that option as well.

bazsa73
03-14-2014, 04:00 AM
I'm walking in the same shoe. I tried a local company specialized in building servers and workstations.
I looked at HP and a Fujitsu prebuild config but these computers usually comes with a ridiculous amount of RAM but labeled as "workstations".
Just doesn't fit into my head how am I supposed to do VFX with 4 GB of RAM.
I want to have a 8 core xeon, 32 GB RAM, Nvidia GTX 660, an SSD disk for boot.

JonW
03-14-2014, 05:24 AM
I want to have a 8 core xeon

Xeons are only worth it if you get 2 of them, & then only, for a work station top end CPUs.

If you are only looking at 1 CPU a Xeon is not the way to go.

spherical
03-14-2014, 05:52 AM
We really need a sticky (or perhaps better yet a whole forum section) for this topic, because it's been covered so many times recently. That the search sucks and Google is the best alternate option, having one place to go to find this information would be great.

site:forums.newtek.com i7-4930

will get you started.

bazsa73
03-14-2014, 06:30 AM
Xeons are only worth it if you get 2 of them, & then only, for a work station top end CPUs.

If you are only looking at 1 CPU a Xeon is not the way to go.

But xeons are more reliable, last longer and can handle ECC ram. If the computer is on for days rendering something big day and night
are you sure I can go with an i7?

- - - Updated - - -

JonW
03-14-2014, 08:54 AM
But xeons are more reliable, last longer and can handle ECC ram. If the computer is on for days rendering something big day and night

I have both & the non Xeons are slightly ahead in reliability. Longest I have had the lot going 24/7 is 3 weeks in 35+ degree room temperature. The only ones that struggled but still made it were a pair of E5335 due to the fact that the box they are in can't fit tower heatsinks & the Intel server fans were spinning at maximum 7000 rpm with open case & an additional fan stuck in the side of the box.

JonW
03-14-2014, 09:19 AM
We really need a sticky (or perhaps better yet a whole forum section) for this topic, because it's been covered so many times recently. That the search sucks and Google is the best alternate option, having one place to go to find this information would be great.

site:forums.newtek.com i7-4930

will get you started.

Agree, lately this has been discussed ad nauseum!

A few thoughts:
Look at the price of the whole box setup including CPU. Do NOT look at the cost of a CPU by itself, it is simply meaningless.

Divide the cost of the whole box setup including OS by the GHz, so you work out actually how much each GHz is really costing. Or better still work out the frame rate per whole box setup.

If one can stretch the funds, more expensive CPUs are actually more economical for workstations. You will get more GHz per dollar.

If your box has 1 CPU do not buy a Xeon (the same GHz Xeon renders at the same speed as non Xeon equivalent for a lot less money). If you are buying a dual Xeon CPU box, top end Xeons are more economical as a whole box setup.

Stick an SSD in the box for OS & current work, & HDD for mass storage.

Only spend money on components you need. Don't waste money on an expensive case & things you don't really need.

If you are not rendering with a graphics card don't waste money on top end cards.

Look at the power consumption, electricity is costing more & more.

Look at the benchmark marbles thread. It doesn't take that long to go through it!
http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?133251-11-5-s-BenchmarkMarbles-lws-share-your-machine-s-render-time-here

Or do a search as Spherical suggested.

bazsa73
03-14-2014, 09:45 AM
Thanks JonW!
I think I go with the i7, you convinced me.

Waves of light
03-14-2014, 11:02 AM
This is my setup, if it helps.

The case was really cheap and I have to say the most suprising part of the rig, as it was massive, great for access and airflow.

Intel Core i7 4930K 3.40GHZ Socket 2011 12MB Cache Retail Boxed Processor 352.92
Asus P9X79 Socket 2011 8 Channel Audio ATX Motherboard 164.96
Corsair Hydro Series H60 2013 model High Performance Liquid CPU Cooler 43.94
Casecom CS-14 Trident Mid-Tower ATX Case - 2x USB 3.0 - 2x USB 2.0 ports 24.99
Samsung 120GB SSD 840 EVO - SSD only 64.38
Crucial 16GB Kit (8GBx2) DDR3 1600 MT/s (PC3-12800) CL8 @1.5V Ballistix Tactical UDIMM 240pin 157.30
WD 1TB 3.5" SATA-III Caviar Green Internal Hard Drive - 64MB Cache 41.95
Corsair Builder Series CXM 750W Modular 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX/EPS*PSU 63.00
GTX 580 93.60

sub total 1,007.04
add VAT 201.41
TOTAL 1,208.45

hrgiger
03-14-2014, 12:06 PM
My build is similar to Richards (Waves of Light) but I went with the deluxe x79 motherboard (wifi built in and some other features and newer board so no issues running the 4930 processor-some older boards require BIOS update before it will work), H100i Corsair cooler, went with a 250GB SSD, and GTX 760 Geforce card. The 4930 overclocks well... with a flip of the switch on the motherboard, I get an instant overclock of 4.1 Ghz over the base 3.4Ghz but its not hard to push it further if you want. I'm not doing a lot of rendering at the moment so I'm fine with a moderate OC. Also went with 32GB of RAM but the board supports 64GB so I can change it out later if I find it insufficient at 32. Can't remember exactly but I I think mine was a little closer to 1,900 U.S. dollars not including the new monitor.

For LightWave, I would say the priority would be processor speed as well as RAM. Any moderate Gfx card will be sufficient and the only reason to want more of a card is If you're going to be using a 3rd party GPU renderer like Octane.

bobakabob
03-14-2014, 04:30 PM
Thanks JonW!
I think I go with the i7, you convinced me.

Not before you've heard more positives about Xeons ;) They are tough beasts designed for servers. One Dell I have is still running 6 years later and it's barely been switched off. Presently using an 8 core Xeon combined with 32 GB Ram - no nonsense, it just WORKS.

JonW
03-14-2014, 11:37 PM
Not before you've heard more positives about Xeons ;) They are tough beasts designed for servers. One Dell I have is still running 6 years later and it's barely been switched off. Presently using an 8 core Xeon combined with 32 GB Ram - no nonsense, it just WORKS.

They are good, but make sure it is NOT built for a server room! http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?100802-5580 Whether it is an old box like mine or a new one, make sure it runs quietly.

If I had a lot of work & big jobs I would buy a new one tomorrow without hesitation. Failing that presently I would be buying a 4930.