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View Full Version : EXR Trader vs. Compositing Buffer Export



Richard Hebert
02-26-2014, 10:52 PM
Hi Guys,

I'm following an older tutorial for comping and the instructor is using EXR Trader. It's difficult for me to follow as I'm using LightWave's built in plugins to create composite layers. It seems cumbersome but I'm not really sure of a workflow that uses LightWaves native tools efficiently for comping. I can find no tutorials that use LightWave only for this kind of production work. Can anyone tell me if the new Buffer Export has similar functionality to something like EXR and if not, is there a tutorial that can suggest a workflow using only LightWave native tools... at least for the moment.

Thanks for all the tips,
Richard

Markc
02-27-2014, 04:45 PM
FYI there is a free version of EXR Trader (with limited functionality).

sukardi
02-27-2014, 05:37 PM
I have not used EXR trader but I find using compositing buffer a pretty straightforward affair.

Just choose whichever pass that you want (from compositing buffer plugin) and save it to multilayer exr (the first options in compositing buffer output files). Then you can open the multilayer EXR in any compositing software that you use.

I think EXR trader has more functions in term of splitting your passes into different folders etc (useful for collaborative studio environment)

There are some issues with a few of the rendering passes but we can discuss about that on individual cases.

Greenlaw
02-27-2014, 07:36 PM
I find exrTrader a whole lot easier to use than the native Compositing Buffer. If you set it up correctly, Fusion, for example, will recognize all the embedded buffer channels immediately. What this means is that if you need motion blur, you can simply attach a Vector Blur node and, voila, you have free motion blur. Need fog? Just add a Fog node and adjust to taste. DOF? Same thing. Need to make Material/Object ID selections? Just wipe the masking eyedropper tool over a surface and you have an instant selection mask. The only limitation I've run into is lack of AA because LightWave doesn't support Coverage data export. A tiny bit of blurring to the M/O ID selections works for simple selections though and can still be handy at times. (It's not nearly as useful as when Coverage is available though.)

I can do basically do the same thing using the native Compositing Buffer tool but I have to jump through a lot of crazy hoops to do it. For a little while, I used it at my workplace when I first started there but I eventually got fed up with it and brought in my personal license of exrTrader.

G.

Richard Hebert
02-27-2014, 09:21 PM
Thanks for the tips. Any ideas about compositing tuts for LW 11? Looking for advanced tuts governing glass surfaces with refractive properties. Having difficulty with combining radiosity and refractive passes. Would like to find something that deals with aspect in great depth. The project I'm working on (for learning purposes) involves a jet. I'm trying to get a photoreal appearance out of the canopy using compositing. The single pass render looks fine but not sure how to get the same look from layered passes. All tuts out there are basic using solid objects. I can do that all day long with no real problems, it's the more advanced areas of compositing that are often overlooked by tutorials in general. I'm looking for advanced tutorials (for purchase) that will help with all aspects of compositing including color gradients and atmospheric effects to the final composite. Thanks for any tips or advice.

Richard

- - - Updated - - -

Thanks for the tips. Any ideas about compositing tuts for LW 11? Looking for advanced tuts governing glass surfaces with refractive properties. Having difficulty with combining radiosity and refractive passes. Would like to find something that deals with aspect in great depth. The project I'm working on (for learning purposes) involves a jet. I'm trying to get a photoreal appearance out of the canopy using compositing. The single pass render looks fine but not sure how to get the same look from layered passes. All tuts out there are basic using solid objects. I can do that all day long with no real problems, it's the more advanced areas of compositing that are often overlooked by tutorials in general. I'm looking for advanced tutorials (for purchase) that will help with all aspects of compositing including color gradients and atmospheric effects to the final composite. Thanks for any tips or advice.

Richard