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gschrick
02-10-2014, 05:28 AM
I'm configuring a new Windows (WIN7) workstation and one of the options is to have my system drive (operating system & applications) on an SSD. I'm still keeping my projects files on larger HHD drives. I know there is a significant speed increase, but I've also read about "write exhaustion" with SSDs. This is a desktop system, so the durability (dropping) isn't an issue. But longevity and reliability is.

The sales person I'm talking to is pushing for the SSD drive, but they're also much more expensive so I'm looking for an objective opinion. Does anybody have a system with an SSD installed? How does it work? And does it last? I tend to keep my workstations for a while, so shelf life is important.

Thanks.

50one
02-10-2014, 05:35 AM
I'm configuring a new Windows (WIN7) workstation and one of the options is to have my system drive (operating system & applications) on an SSD. I'm still keeping my projects files on larger HHD drives. I know there is a significant speed increase, but I've also read about "write exhaustion" with SSDs. This is a desktop system, so the durability (dropping) isn't an issue. But longevity and reliability is.

The sales person I'm talking to is pushing for the SSD drive, but they're also much more expensive so I'm looking for an objective opinion. Does anybody have a system with an SSD installed? How does it work? And does it last? I tend to keep my workstations for a while, so shelf life is important.

Thanks.



Got two SSD's on my Win7 rig, one with system only, other with apps. Been running for more than two years with no problems, once you get the Ssd you'll never look back, i can imagine that a lot have changed during those two years, make sure to do some research and buy the best possible hardware.

tayotain2
02-10-2014, 06:38 AM
i build my rig with 120gb ocz vertex 2 ssd for Windows. After 1 month it died. Got new one but its dead now... after 8 months. now using old HDD for my system. :( we have indentical rig with no problems. Maybe its just bad luck....

MarcusM
02-10-2014, 06:53 AM
I had opportunity play a while on system on SSD and it is super fast. The same thing with Photoshop, simple test, drawing on very big file with very big brush is smooth, the same situation on HDD is almost impossible to work.
Me personally have Intel SSDSC2CW180A301 and 130 GB Unity 3d projects on this. Working on complicated and big terrains need fast data writing/reading. SSD drive saving me a lot of time and nervs.
I heard that SSD drives need good power supply, with surge protectors etc. I have also UPS. Sometimes switch off electricity due to construction but SSD working fine :]

Lightwolf
02-10-2014, 06:54 AM
I've been running a Vertex3 as a OS and application drive on my old system for two years without a hitch - and the new system is SSD based as well.

I wouldn't want to do without it. And yes, especially if it's a smaller SSD (i.e. 120GB or so) make sure to only use it to store files that are read often as opposed to written to. For example, the swap file should be moved to a HDD, the same goes for the temp directory.

Cheers,
Mike

Ryan Roye
02-10-2014, 07:00 AM
Since SSD's are still a bit on the pricey side, my recommendation is to have a moderate-sized SSD (go for a 120GB one or larger) for all of your program files that houses your Operating System since it'll boost performance of your computer significantly by eliminating the data bottleneck, and use a 500+ GB HDD for storage such as your Lightwave files, videos you might download, etc.

I agree: once you go SSD, you never go back.

Lightwolf
02-10-2014, 07:06 AM
What I'd currently recommend are Samsung EVOs... and you can get them from 120GB to 1TB.

Cheers,
Mike

prometheus
02-10-2014, 07:38 AM
Fluid simulations from turbulenceFD directly on to SSD is recommended, for faster simulations.

Michael

meatycheesyboy
02-10-2014, 07:55 AM
Not sure how much this adds to the conversation but here's my experience.

On my home machine I run two SSDs (Intel 180GB). One of them has my OS and programs on it and the other is for current project files (archived projects get offloaded to my server), temp files, and swap disk space. They've been running for about 1.5 years without any problems and are significantly faster than my old system that used traditional HDDs.

On the flipside, the company I work for bought 20 new laptops about a year ago, all of which have SSDs. I'm not sure what brand they are but our IT guy has been slowly replacing them over the past few months as they have been dying one by one.

JonW
02-10-2014, 01:47 PM
Buy an Intel SSD.

The same can be said for HDD, I have had a couple die but I have never had a Velociraptor die.

I still use HDDs for storage & make other copies on other computers & separate HDDs.

CharlieL
02-10-2014, 02:22 PM
I often use an ASUS G74Sx for LW-work. It had an 120 GB SSD and a standard HD with two partitions.
Just before the end of last year the SSD laid off with a loud crash.
I had my Win7 OS on the SSD so all installs disappeared, and also most of the files in the HDD partitions
were destroyed. This happened two years and three months after i bought it. Therefore there was no
warranty in force.
Now I have a 160 GB SSD in it. Hope this one will last longer.

ActionBob
02-10-2014, 02:26 PM
I'm configuring a new Windows (WIN7) workstation and one of the options is to have my system drive (operating system & applications) on an SSD..

You could also save some money and buy a 2 terabyte HYBRID drive (8gig flash on 2 terabyte Seagate drive). You will get faster performance at a much lower cost than putting up for the full SSD.

Dell has SSHD drives at 2 terabytes for $130.00. Look into it.

jburford
02-10-2014, 03:01 PM
i build my rig with 120gb ocz vertex 2 ssd for Windows. After 1 month it died. Got new one but its dead now... after 8 months. now using old HDD for my system. :( we have indentical rig with no problems. Maybe its just bad luck....

Similar here. We changed the System Drives over to SSD's about 13 months ago. Starting around 7-8 months, we have now had 3 die with complete failure.

ActionBob
02-10-2014, 03:11 PM
Similar here. We changed the System Drives over to SSD's about 13 months ago. Starting around 7-8 months, we have now had 3 die with complete failure.


I have a 120 SSD gig in my rig with 3 larger drives (including 2 of the 2 terabyte hybrids I mentioned). I have heard that SSD's will wear out with a lot of writing to them; and you should not run defragmentation on them as this is just undue wear. The SSD drive I have in my machine has been in there about 2 years - since I built the machine. It is an INTEL brand SSD and hasn't given me any issues. My brother, on the other hand, built a machine with an "on sale, off-brand SSD and it seemed to give him issues in less than a few months.

Honestly, for the price, get some HYBRID drives - increased performance and the price is low enough that you could get multiples and run them in a RAID 0 +1 config for fast large file transfer and redundancy.....

m.d.
02-10-2014, 04:11 PM
I ran hybrid drives for a while....almost no performance increase in drive speed...

they basically cache often used files to the flash memory....so they can help especially if the OS is installed

but if you are dealing with high rez video...or large sims ect...that will in all probability be written to the mechanical component of the hybrid drive...not on the flash
I was at first convinced they would help...but in reality they seem a bit of a gimmick.
I did test this using Atto disk benchmark, and just some other performance tools

I have seen no performance increase on my hybrid drives....they may help a bit with your OS drive though as the drive can store part of the booting OS on the system...
just dont expect it to do miracles in file transfer ect

I have my OS and cache drives on SSD, and a velociraptor external 12TB raid setup, and another 9tb in my machine

madno
02-10-2014, 08:12 PM
My 2 cent:
I had
- 2 x Crucial C300 256 GB
- 1 x Crucial M4 256 GB
- 1 x Samsung MZ 7PC256D 256 GB
Currently:
- 3 x Samsung Pro 256 GB

And a bunch of others in the company's notebooks.

So far none of them died (knock on wood).

Regarding the "SSD gets damaged if you write on it" discussion.

Here is a review of the Samsung 840 Pro including a comparison to the standard 840.
http://www.ubergizmo.com/2013/05/samsung-840-pro-review-256gb/

The conclusion is, that if the system writes 10 GB of data each day (and the internal overhead extends that to a real 35 GB write to the storage cells) one can expect that:
- the standard Samsung 840 with TLC chips is fully dead after 19 years of use
- the Pro Samsung 840 with MLC chips is fully dead after 60 years of use.

If you like to read more about what it is all about; here is a good starting point:
http://www.storagesearch.com/ssdmyths-endurance.html

Waves of light
02-11-2014, 04:00 AM
I have a Samsung Evo 120GB for my system disk and all my major programs (LW, PS, Ai, AE, etc.) and a 1TB HDD for everything else. Only had it a while, so I can't quote on reliability, but I can say it's fast at loading programs and runs smoothly (so far).

And here's a guide to keeping the junk off your SSD when doing a fresh Win install:
http://www.overclock.net/t/1156654/seans-windows-7-install-optimization-guide-for-ssds-hdds

gschrick
02-12-2014, 06:28 AM
Thanks for all the info and advice. I'm using BOXX as my vender, so hopefully they are using a reputable brand. But if not, my experience with their support staff in the past has been absolutely great in the rare times I had to contact them (usually to walk me through a hardware upgrade).

I am mostly concerned with write exhaustion issue and it seems like if I configure my temp files correctly and avoid defragmenting that shouldn't be a problem for a long while. As for reliability and failure... well that is a problem all types drives have. The TV station I work at used to use LACIE for external HHD networkable drives, but after replacing the power supplies over 10 times (no exaggeration) we finally gave up on them.

Thanks for all the help.