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torturebori007
12-20-2013, 08:04 PM
Guys and gals, I need some direction, more like a bit of help on how to go about texturing

The attached. It mainly consists of wood. (2x8's, 4x8's) so pretty much like a 2x4 wood stud.

This is supposed to be Douglas Fir material(smooth, meaning its been sanded)


Please I would really appreciate the help.


Thanks,

Torture118825118826

djwaterman
12-21-2013, 01:52 AM
Be a little more specific, is your question, how should I map the texture onto this? Or is it what's the best way to make wood look realistic? People here can help you but the question is a little broad right now?

pinkmouse
12-21-2013, 03:13 AM
Indeed, a bit more info would be helpful. But as a first tip, go into modeller and make sure each part has a surface name that indicates which direction the grain goes on that part. That should give you at least seven surfaces on the porch by my count. ;)

torturebori007
12-21-2013, 07:29 AM
Ok...So a bit of both. But I am a total noob at texturing.

So the best way to start out doing it right would be best.

And ok I do have all the posts named posts, the rafters, and so on.

Its just that I tried making them look like wood and couldn't, or realistic you know and just don't seem to figure that out.

Please attached image of the real build.

See image of actual real build.

Waves of light
12-21-2013, 09:05 AM
There are two ways I would approach this, if I were doing it:

1. Create UVs and texture them in Photoshop (or another paint package)

2. Import my model into 3DCoat, create UVs and projection paint directly onto the model.

Either way, you will need to do some research into your textures. A good place to find free textures is here:
http://www.lovetextures.com/
http://www.mayang.com/textures/index.htm
http://www.cgtextures.com/

EDIT: If you have access to the actual house, then close up pics of the structure will help.

Let's look at option number 1:

Inside LW, with the object loaded, click on the T (bottom right) and select New from the drop down menu, furthest right.

In the 'Create UV Texture Map' window, give your texture map a name 'UV_Roof_detail' - Map Type to Atlas and click create. This will give you a UV map with all the parts of your roof broken into pieces.

In the menus, click File | Export | EPS and save out your UV map as 'UV_Roof_detail.eps'.

Open your paint package and open the 'UV_Roof_detail.eps' file.

Import your textures and copy, paste, chop, change into position. Save out the resulting image.

Back to Modeler. Press F5 (Surface Editor) Select one of the surfaces and click on the T button (texture editor) next to Color (or you can use Nodes if you know how to use a nodel setup) -

Select UV in 'Projection'
Select your UV Map name in 'UVMap'
Select the image you saved from your paint package in the 'Image' menu

You'll then need to go back and forth from Modeler and Photoshop, until you're happy with your texturing. To do this I have Modeler and PS open together. I save out my new texture after tweaks, back into Modeler, Press F6 (Image Editor) and select Reload for it to update the UV texture.

You'll then need to use your base texture map to create a bump/normal map, diffuse map, spec map, etc.

Option 2:

Either create the UVs as above, save the lwo (modeler) file and import it into 3DCoat. Or import your lwo (without UVs created) into 3DCoat and create the UVs inside 3DCoat.

As long as you have UVs created you can projection paint directly onto your model inside 3DCoat (by bringing in your reference images and using those as stencils whilst you brush the detail over your mesh). This is a huge advantage, because you can see what your final object will look like. And 3DCoat works well with LW, as it's exports to lwo and obj formats.

It also allows you to paint your spec and bump areas directly onto the object, instead of having to create them from your base texture (as with method 1)

Here's some pics from a wooden guillotine I did, you may find the similarities helpful (for this I used the Create UVs in LW and then import object into 3DCoat)

Base model and Atlas UV map created in LW:
118831

Model projection painted inside 3DCoat:
118833

Resulting texture map (done in 3DCoat, but similar result could be achieved painting directly on UV map inside PS)
118832

Hope that helps.

Ricky.

torturebori007
12-21-2013, 09:16 AM
That helps tremendously...Great breakdown by the way. I really appreciate the time it took to lay this out. The great thing about this is that its here for anyone to learn from it not just me.

Thanks a million, when I have something done I will show it.

Torture

Waves of light
12-21-2013, 09:32 AM
That helps tremendously...Great breakdown by the way. I really appreciate the time it took to lay this out. The great thing about this is that its here for anyone to learn from it not just me.

Thanks a million, when I have something done I will show it.

Torture

Not a problem, that's how I learnt... from the generous people on this forum.

Just remember that to make it look real, you have to understand what makes up the wooden texture. It's not just the base colour map. Bump/normal maps are very important as they bring out the imperfections of the wood (stopping it from looking cg). Then there's the spec map (used to define a surface's shininess and highlight colour), diffuse map (where your texture will be darker). And even when you've done the most excellent textures, there's lighting.

Oh, one thing I forgot to mention is map size. You can have different map sizes depending on the level of detail you require. So, if the object is going to have the camera coming closer, then a higher resolution map maybe required. I tend to use 8k maps (8192 x 8192 pixels) and then resample them down to lower res maps if needed. Remember, you can't scale images up and retain quality, so better to start large and resample down.

I can highly recommend this set of tutorials on texturing (paid for I'm afraid)
Making Materials: http://online.cg-masters.com/videos/software/3

He goes through everything to do with creating great textures inside of Lightwave, the different maps, conservation of energy, different textures under different lighting. Well worth it if you're just starting out or struggling at texturing.

erikals
12-21-2013, 10:35 AM
you can use the PLG plugin and UV map the house like this >


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npvR-y_0YHs

torturebori007
12-21-2013, 11:31 AM
Not a problem, that's how I learnt... from the generous people on this forum.

Just remember that to make it look real, you have to understand what makes up the wooden texture. It's not just the base colour map. Bump/normal maps are very important as they bring out the imperfections of the wood (stopping it from looking cg). Then there's the spec map (used to define a surface's shininess and highlight colour), diffuse map (where your texture will be darker). And even when you've done the most excellent textures, there's lighting.

Oh, one thing I forgot to mention is map size. You can have different map sizes depending on the level of detail you require. So, if the object is going to have the camera coming closer, then a higher resolution map maybe required. I tend to use 8k maps (8192 x 8192 pixels) and then resample them down to lower res maps if needed. Remember, you can't scale images up and retain quality, so better to start large and resample down.

I can highly recommend this set of tutorials on texturing (paid for I'm afraid)
Making Materials: http://online.cg-masters.com/videos/software/3

He goes through everything to do with creating great textures inside of Lightwave, the different maps, conservation of energy, different textures under different lighting. Well worth it if you're just starting out or struggling at texturing.

Thats some great help...

lertola2
12-22-2013, 06:09 PM
You could also use the wood procedural texture.

http://forums.newtek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=118857&d=1387760683

torturebori007
12-23-2013, 06:09 AM
You could also use the wood procedural texture.

http://forums.newtek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=118857&d=1387760683

Well I tried that too, and yeah mine didnt come out as nice as yours, but I have made some advancement with the method Waves Of Light suggested.

I will try this procedural way as well as it looks awesome too.

Thanks

JonW
12-23-2013, 08:17 AM
Or you could photograph a nice surface of wood & put the effort in so it looks really nice & a bit understated. It depends if you really need every last bit of detail on your object. Make a nice large tileable image in Photoshop etc so it fits onto any surface. & rotate the image on vertical surfaced timber & the appropriate angle for angled surfaces. If your tileable image is well make you should not have to waste the time to UV for the various timber surface. Also make another tileable image for the end grain.

& use the same image in the Bump channel, plus a layer or two of Procedural Texture for noise on the surface to break it up a bit.

torturebori007
12-23-2013, 05:15 PM
Guys, these are all great gifts. The help is so AWESOME here.

Tomorrow I will post a screenshot of what I will have from all your expert help. One thing I like most is how, unique every thought is and how there is more than one way to skin a cat.

Thank you guys