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saranine
12-11-2013, 02:10 AM
Where does the ability to write good code fit into a professional CG career?

Is this ability of any use when combined with animation, modelling, traditional drawing, rigging or other aspects of working in a CG field?

It is probably clear by now that I am a knowledge junkie. My aim in life is to learn ANYTHING. So python, ruby, C or any other language is all interesting to me. I wish that I had 46 hours in a day. But maybe there is hope. I was watching a doco yesterday about the earth. It was called "orbit, the history of a year" [on youtube?] In it the scientist said that about 400 million years ago there were about 410 days in a year because the days were shorter. So if the days are getting longer there is hope for me :)

I am like one of those wicked cartoon characters who cackles "soon, world domination will be mine, muhahaha". Except with me it is like saying "I will take all of your knowledge..."

Sensei
12-11-2013, 02:50 AM
I wish that I had 46 hours in a day. But maybe there is hope. I was watching a doco yesterday about the earth. It was called "orbit, the history of a year" [on youtube?] In it the scientist said that about 400 million years ago there were about 410 days in a year because the days were shorter. So if the days are getting longer there is hope for me

2*3.14159265*150,000,000 km = 30 km/s * 86400 s * 365.25

so:

2*3.14159265*150,000,000 km = 30 km/s * 76600 s * 410

;)

dballesg
12-11-2013, 03:05 AM
Hi,

It fits allowing you to do create your own tools and implement pipelines between different software or renderers for example. It can go from something as simple as a script that renames a bunch of files, or items; to your own rigging systems, or more advance topics, your own shaders or even a renderer if your math skills are up to it.

You did not mention if you have previous experience with programming, I will asume you don't have it. So I will suggest to start with Python. The reason it's because is implemented on almost every 3D app out there and there is a plethora of written tutorials, videotutorials, even tailored to be used inside 3D Applications. Google is your friend here.

Be aware there are two main branches of Python the 2.X series (more commonly used in 3D apps) and the 3.X series (Blender uses that one). They have small sinctactic differences.

You can start for example here:
http://www.diveintopython.net/

And then start reading the Python documentation that comes with LW 11.6 and try to do a simple script. For example rename an Item.

And on more advanced topics I think you will be interested on this free course:

UDACITY: Interactive 3D Graphics (https://www.udacity.com/course/cs291)

Cheers,
David

saranine
12-11-2013, 03:18 AM
Thanks for the references! Yes! I don't know how to program. Python looks like a good place to start.

Tranimatronic
12-11-2013, 05:48 PM
Learn Python. Learn 3d. Learn how to explain to developers why artists want to do things the way they do. Learn how to explain to artists why they have to work a certain way.
Create tools that help people work, not need work to work.
Get phone calls from Microsoft asking you to come help their latest xbox one blockbuster, but have to refuse because you already have too much work.


Thats what I did ;)

Ryan Roye
12-11-2013, 06:20 PM
Programming has been important throughout my entire digital media career; it has been utilized for most of the programs i've used (Flash, web programming, Lightwave, general scripting languages like AHK, etc). I do not consider myself an expert... but there are certain projects and tasks that i've completed that would have been incredibly time consuming without the benefit of at least *some* programming knowledge.

In my opinion, it is best to start with simple macros because even new users with very little knowledge in programming can immediately benefit from being able to string a series of commands together. This makes for a great gateway to actual programming and introduces the user to the concept that it almost always operates kind of like gravity; lines get read from top to bottom (unless told otherwise) and the computer performs the tasks according to what it reads. Here's an excellent demonstration of what I'm talking about concerning LW:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=96lyQR89UC8

I know Lscript is being phased out, but the concepts demonstrated here can be applied to python as well!

It is when you want to start applying logic (if/else statements, functions, etc) when things start to get quite a bit more involved... but it is very liberating when a person discovers for the first time that one isn't necessarily restricted to the functions that a program provides, or are at the mercy of whether a plugin developer happened to have the same needs as a particular user.

saranine
12-11-2013, 06:52 PM
That is a nice video! I looked at your youtube channel as well and found more lightwave videos :)

Thank you so much!