PDA

View Full Version : CAD software experience as a modeller



eV1Te
11-12-2013, 05:42 AM
I have been using LightWave for many years now, but recently I had to learn a bit of CAD, Solid Edge ST5 to be precise. The purpose was to model a few items for 3D printing.

After a few hours of headache I still feel like CAD has not developed as much as for example LightWave.

The only thing I miss in LightWave is real measurements and easy ways of measuring distances between surfaces or diameters of circular geometry otherwise I would never leave it!

Anyone else have any comments on the differences between CAD and LightWave?

3DGFXStudios
11-12-2013, 06:31 AM
I've no comments about the differences between a CAD program an LW because there are to many but have you tried LWCad? http://www.wtools3d.com/

chikega
11-12-2013, 07:40 AM
CAD definitely has it's place. And in some ways, it's easier to model some objects in CAD than to do the same using SubD's in a polygonal modeler. The former developer of Rhinoceros, created MoI (Moment of Inspiration) which is an excellent and user-friendly CAD program that also has an excellent .lwo exporter.

http://moi3d.com/

http://www.k4icy.com/tutorials.html

jwiede
11-12-2013, 12:33 PM
CAD definitely has it's place. And in some ways, it's easier to model some objects in CAD than to do the same using SubD's in a polygonal modeler. The former developer of Rhinoceros, created MoI (Moment of Inspiration) which is an excellent and user-friendly CAD program that also has an excellent .lwo exporter.

http://moi3d.com/

http://www.k4icy.com/tutorials.html

There are CSG NURBS modelers which are right at the edge of being CAD apps, FormZ springs to mind with its precision toolset, extensive dimensioning and sectioning support, but generally when most say "CAD" people mean apps like ProEngineer, or SolidWorks, or AutoCAD. Spend even five minutes in one of those apps, and the difference is painfully obvious: They're just functioning at a much higher level with regards to the precision of work possible, and in their flexibility of how that work (and its dimensions) can be presented and output. MoI is great, I own a license, but IMO it is nowhere near precise enough to qualify as a "CAD application".

prometheus
11-12-2013, 01:42 PM
for modeling for cg and rapid prototyping, lightwave might do fine in most cases, but solid modeling has advantages and are often parametric so you can change values at any time without having to recreate it or do workaround modifications which is the case with Lightwave.

You wouldnīt go a with lightwave as a tool for creating gym machines or the likes of such constructions, too much importance of accuracy and having dimension, filleting with proper radius, surface blending not limited of how polygons look, but unlimited in the form of solids.
stress evaluation tools, printing of blueprints/drawings in a correct manner etc.
solidworks and catia pro engineer has soo many tools needed for that stuff, that lightwave doesnīt come close to.

toy, or hobby manufacturing or set prototypes within a certain range has become more attractive nowadays with some implemented stl plugins for lightwave, and the home desktop revolution...and some design models..especially freeform shapes are actually probably easier do mocup of in Lightwave.

Ivé been working alongside an engineer who did the constructions for gym machines on solidworks, and it was obvious how smooth and elegant most of the design process was for creating constructions in solidworks, navigation beats lightwave amongst others and such task would be almost impossible in lightwave, that said..he found himself not being that familiar with shaping of softer partīs like cushions, maybe if he would have been on the solidworks surface tools....so I had to freform
in lightwave and replace those parts on the constructions..the rest was just converted to obj format ..but as mentioned cushions modeled in lightwave and finally render all out in lightwave.

Michael

spherical
11-12-2013, 06:16 PM
I have quite a few CAD applications, and use each according to its strengths. However, you say you went into CAD in order to model for 3D printing. Interesting. I do all of my FDM/additive manufacturing models in LightWave. CAD applications most often are very poor at exporting meshes—especially ones that must be manifold—which is what a slicer requires. The two approaches to what looks like the same type of operation is what makes a CAD application not so great for something destined to be taken apart into a bazillion layers and then reassembled by a machine. Lots of errors are introduced and you end up going into a mesh modeler to fix them or the slicer gets confused because there is no clear inside/outside to the part. Lots of people try to rely on mesh analyzers like Netfabb an MeshLab. ML is pretty good but NF usually introduces its own errors while fixing ones it thinks it found. I've seen some really Borked models that NF said were fine. Anyhoos, unless there is some esoteric reason why a CAD application is necessary, I'd stick with a mesh modeler. I'm able to do anything I want in 3D printing with LW. Heck, it's what I use to fix other's crappy models.

Dodgy
11-12-2013, 08:23 PM
Having worked with Solid Edge myself, I know what ev1te means. While it is very precise, with a construction history and powerful snapping, both things it'd be awesome to have in LW(snapping we get with the fantastic LWCAD), some of the tools in SE are so faffy to set up and use, click click, open a menu, click, drag click, when the equivalent in LWCAD is click-drag done. I bought ViaCAD a few weeks ago, so I want to give that a good try out and see how it compares (I haven't had a chance since then).

colkai
11-13-2013, 05:01 AM
Mike, you'll love it, there are so many features you will find yourself using daily, in the end, you wonder how you got by without them. :) (Yeah, I'm biased, massive LWCAD fan here :D )

prometheus
11-13-2013, 07:39 AM
I have quite a few CAD applications, and use each according to its strengths. However, you say you went into CAD in order to model for 3D printing. Interesting. I do all of my FDM/additive manufacturing models in LightWave. CAD applications most often are very poor at exporting meshes—especially ones that must be manifold—which is what a slicer requires. The two approaches to what looks like the same type of operation is what makes a CAD application not so great for something destined to be taken apart into a bazillion layers and then reassembled by a machine. Lots of errors are introduced and you end up going into a mesh modeler to fix them or the slicer gets confused because there is no clear inside/outside to the part. Lots of people try to rely on mesh analyzers like Netfabb an MeshLab. ML is pretty good but NF usually introduces its own errors while fixing ones it thinks it found. I've seen some really Borked models that NF said were fine. Anyhoos, unless there is some esoteric reason why a CAD application is necessary, I'd stick with a mesh modeler. I'm able to do anything I want in 3D printing with LW. Heck, it's what I use to fix other's crappy models.

Esoteric reason? why would the reason of using CAD applications be defined as that?, rather more logical since itīs a solid model approach which allows you to perform taskīs that is very hard to do with a poly modeler, which is limitied on how the surfaces is divided in poly representation, if I mention bevel,rounder, booleans with fillet or round blending, and you might get an idea on how careful you need to be for doing that in a poly modeler, where in solid modeling, you just pick the surfaces and perform the taskīs without the limits caused by a polymodeler.

I donīt think the cad vs lightwave was specificly questioned with 3d printing in mind, as I mentioned in my post earlier about construction and how that wouldnīt be possible with lightwave, you might get an idea on why lightwave isnīt the top choice for manufacturing of tools, machines, construction work etc.

Im glad though that it seems to work fine for you in the print department, but I am surprised you say cad application is not so great for 3d printing, isnīt that in such case a poorly construced model in CAD? or lack of understanding how to output it properly to 3d prints?

If you design for art, movies, prints etc...the logical choice is probably lightwave,modo or others alike if you design for construction areas, production of tools, machines..the logical choice would be solidworks, catia,pro-engineer, rhino etc.
Thereīs always a gray zone where the poly or solid modeler can perform tasks on the other side so to speak, lightwave printing of 3d hearts for repo men etc, or some cad
tool rendering for art prints etc, but then itīs a matter of what is in the house already to perform a task ..rather than starting empty and adding a software for
the specific task, and having to worry about the cost of it all too.

For cad itīs also a matter of using parts previously construced in a library and re-use, also options to do parametric modeling and changes of hundreds of thousands of
holes for bolts and nuts by just picking the hole type in a list and change all holes to another dimension in one go and with accuracy, and do
similar things with fillets, or radius of beams etc...so the construction part/workflow is as important as to what you also get for the end output ..such as 3d print.

I so wish we can have a standalone modeler (though I am for intergrated modeler tools too) and that modeler to have parametric history, that would
also unleash LW-cad enourmously, picking up previously made multi windows on a building, pick them from a list, replace and with a different window type in one go, or
the need to change height,width...without having to carefully select each part and try to accuratly scale with lightwave not so smooth/accurate value non mm edit tools.

Michael

spherical
11-13-2013, 06:15 PM
Im glad though that it seems to work fine for you in the print department, but I am surprised you say cad application is not so great for 3d printing, isnīt that in such case a poorly construced model in CAD? or lack of understanding how to output it properly to 3d prints?

I don't know about the capability level of other users. Yes, quite probably, they are not constructing their models in an optimum way. Still, even with my very careful nature when doing anything, if I design a model in AutoCAD, making sure that everything is as clean as it can be, and try an export to mesh, it screws up. Multiple coincident points, flipped polys, poly chains, polys not connected to anything, the list goes on. I end up bringing the model into Modeler and fixing it. Rhino has been better at it than most.

Usually, the user is using Export from the CAD application. Frequently, these export routines don't work all that well and, as such, exacerbate the problem. Could very well be that the application export routine is what is introducing some of the errors. My advice is to use a dedicated format translator; not assume that the programmers who wrote the CAD application are the best at writing translation functions.

The point was, the OP said that he HAD to learn CAD to do stuff for 3D printing. I'm saying that this is not necessarily the case. LightWave Modeler is quite capable. Why fight with an application you don't know; when you can stick with the one that you do know?

JonW
11-13-2013, 07:07 PM
Mike, you'll love it, there are so many features you will find yourself using daily, in the end, you wonder how you got by without them. :) (Yeah, I'm biased, massive LWCAD fan here :D )

& get a 30" monitor to go with it to make it even better!

prometheus
11-13-2013, 09:08 PM
I don't know about the capability level of other users. Yes, quite probably, they are not constructing their models in an optimum way. Still, even with my very careful nature when doing anything, if I design a model in AutoCAD, making sure that everything is as clean as it can be, and try an export to mesh, it screws up. Multiple coincident points, flipped polys, poly chains, polys not connected to anything, the list goes on. I end up bringing the model into Modeler and fixing it. Rhino has been better at it than most.

Usually, the user is using Export from the CAD application. Frequently, these export routines don't work all that well and, as such, exacerbate the problem. Could very well be that the application export routine is what is introducing some of the errors. My advice is to use a dedicated format translator; not assume that the programmers who wrote the CAD application are the best at writing translation functions.

The point was, the OP said that he HAD to learn CAD to do stuff for 3D printing. I'm saying that this is not necessarily the case. LightWave Modeler is quite capable. Why fight with an application you don't know; when you can stick with the one that you do know?

Hereīs some insight on the kernel stuff of the CAD side...
http://blog.grabcad.com/2013/05/kernels-why-cad-systems-dont-play-well-with-others/
Just wondering...are you getting screwed up stl files when saving ut from cad? and I mean saving out directly to stl, and not importing in to lightwave, does it screw up the direct print or stl output ?

spherical
11-13-2013, 11:23 PM
Usually, that is the path that most people seem to take, yes. Evidently, the STL converters aren't working very well. Although, in my testing, saving out to other formats and then converting to STL, sometimes doesn't work well, either. CAD applications just work differently. Most are not concerned with whether a shape is manifold or not. It is not any difference at all whether a wall is actually attached to the floor or the bolt hole is actually attached to the surface through which it penetrates. These conditions DO make a difference when trying to "see" an object as a multitude of 0.125mm thick layers that, added on top of one another, will faithfully reproduce that whole structure.

chippwalters
01-04-2014, 03:55 AM
I know this is an old thread, but there are a couple of points I think are worth making. I've used formZ for about 18 months now. It's a reasonably good and affordable solid modeler that is extremely easy to use-- especially if you have experience with a program like sketchup.

One of the problems with both sketchup and formZ, is the issue of interactive design. One of the challenges when using less flexible solid or hard surface modelers, is that it becomes increasingly difficult to design and modify your design while you are modeling it.

Solid modelers like formZ make it very difficult to select a bunch of object end vertices and extend an object by a specific amount. Typically, you must Boolean split it and then manually stitch it together which is an arduous task. Basically, what I'm trying to say is iterative model design and tweaking is not very flexible using these types of programs.

The below video, I created after reviewing an online modeling presentation video showing how a surface modeler can be used to interactively create objects at whim. This is one of the best features a program like LW modeler can be used for when creating 3-D printed models.


http://youtu.be/V5eC_AQU-2Q

prometheus
01-04-2014, 06:58 AM
I know this is an old thread, but there are a couple of points I think are worth making. I've used formZ for about 18 months now. It's a reasonably good and affordable solid modeler that is extremely easy to use-- especially if you have experience with a program like sketchup.

One of the problems with both sketchup and formZ, is the issue of interactive design. One of the challenges when using less flexible solid or hard surface modelers, is that it becomes increasingly difficult to design and modify your design while you are modeling it.

Solid modelers like formZ make it very difficult to select a bunch of object end vertices and extend an object by a specific amount. Typically, you must Boolean split it and then manually stitch it together which is an arduous task. Basically, what I'm trying to say is iterative model design and tweaking is not very flexible using these types of programs.

The below video, I created after reviewing an online modeling presentation video showing how a surface modeler can be used to interactively create objects at whim. This is one of the best features a program like LW modeler can be used for when creating 3-D printed models.


http://youtu.be/V5eC_AQU-2Q


Thanks for that, interesting techniques and indeed a capable modeler.
Have you ever tried solidworks?
yeah sure some model tasks will be done faster in Lightwave, but most of the stuff can be done in solidworks with non destructive workflow, in Lightwave you just canīt go in and change the radius of many fillets youvé done, so
if you do not ever need to, that might be fine, but for those designing parts that needs changing at a later stage in the product, It wonīt be satisfactory.

the approach of creating round holes shown in the video feels a little too awkward, why selecting specific polys then smoothing out to get a round hole, then select polys again and then merge them? would be simple enough in
solidworks to just create the hole in one go., and perhaps the same in lightwave with stenciling or lwcad drill booleans.
I donīt follow you on the formz boolean and then stitch it, donīt have formz so I cant follow that, but I donīt think solidworks would encounter such problem.

chippwalters
01-04-2014, 11:34 AM
Nope. I have not tried solidworks. This brings up another interesting issue for hobbyists like myself. Many many years ago I ran a company and we standardized on lightwave. We did a lot of big jobs including pilots for DreamWorks, visualizations for the Discovery Channel, and even created a pilot for our own TV series called Mission to Avalon. Back then, I had folks working with me who were experts and lived in lightwave 8 to 16 hours a day. If I had a question, it was easily and quickly answered.

The company got sold and I set about reinventing myself and learned to program. And since then I've done a lot of work in enterprise development. I now manage a group of designers and developers working on learning infrastructure projects across the country.

The reason I mention all this is that 3D is no longer a part of my livelihood. So, I don't get a chance to spend a lot of time in 3D. Still, I quite enjoy spending time modeling, rendering, and now building things with my 3-D printer.

And, that is one of the reasons why years ago I learned sketchup and soon afterwards formZ. Both are extremely easy to learn, and if you step away from them for months at a time, you can jump back in and continue where you left off. It's also one of the reasons I really like Keyhot. Again, very simple to learn, and easy to work with.

I do remember what it was like working with lightwave, and how flexible and powerful it's Modeler was and still is. Even so, as many have noted here on these forums, the workflow is somewhat obtuse and it's not an easy program to learn. Even so, I learned LW in the past, and fortunate for me it comes back really fast.

This is a long way of saying that I don't have or want to spend time learning yet another elaborate program like solidworks. I'm sure the learning curve is significant, plus, it is also very expensive. Furthermore, I suspect it's not great as a concept modeler. I understand switching a radius or fillet here and there is possible, but complete and quick modeling changes as shown in the video below, I think would be quite difficult.

The below video was created by Vitaly Bulgarov as a concept modeling demonstration and in it he uses XSI to quickly model a robot This is what I was after in creating my video above. My guess is it would be very difficult to do something like this in solidworks.


http://youtu.be/4ct9voyU3h0

gristle
01-04-2014, 01:26 PM
... can be done in solidworks with non destructive workflow...

Haha, SW may be parametric but they have only now added the facility to change references in sketches. Their mantra for years has been it is easier to delete features and geometry than try and edit a model (rather than add useful rerouting tools for references). Hardly non destructive. Sure, it is if you are doing simple solid operations, not so much if you are working on more advanced models, surfaces etc.

prometheus
01-04-2014, 02:33 PM
Haha, SW may be parametric but they have only now added the facility to change references in sketches. Their mantra for years has been it is easier to delete features and geometry than try and edit a model (rather than add useful rerouting tools for references). Hardly non destructive. Sure, it is if you are doing simple solid operations, not so much if you are working on more advanced models, surfaces etc.

I donīt follow you on that, from what I know, you have been able to edit and change most things in solidworks for years, radius of fillets,rounds,curves,holes etc...and you do that with accuracy in mm or microns, at any time which you canīt do in lightwave...make a simple beam with a certain fillet radius on the corners, then you canīt go back and change it, you have to redraw it...itīs as simple as that, in solidwork..just go back an pick the fillet in the list, and change radius or lenght of the beam or thickness for that matter with desired values.

Advanced models? depends on what you are doing..a mechanical construction can be very advanced and from construction point of view, lightwave wouldnīt be ideal to start working with, then again trying to model a face or a figurine is a job for lightwave not solidworks..and there you have it in its package, construction companies do not choose lightwave for their tasks, it makes no sense, just as visual artists,motion graphics,movie fx doesnīt make any sense to boost up solidworks for the task.

not all goes to a 3d printer for a fast nice little model that just will be sitting their as a finished plastic model, cad tools has to bee editable and parametric to change construction after it has been evaluated and a decision is made to change the construction after needed requirements.

I worked with an engineer doing constructions for gym machines, and of course solidworks was the tool of choice for creating drawings/sheets for the construction workers to cut and weld togheter,drill and fix screws and bolts,hydralics etc..

I could spot where it would be insane to use lightwave for certain parts, but also where I could use lightwave to produce renders of the machines, but it was very little modeling in lightwave,I remodelled and replaced cushions, did some welds with some tube tools in lightwave and of course resurfaced it all and then rendered.
Welding and making cushions could have been done in solidworks too..but that wasnīt our engineers strong side to work with curved surfaces.

Polys are limiting the modeling process in a way solid modeling isnīt, and there are of course stuff that works the other way around...but as mentioned, thereīs a reason people choose cad tools for construction and design process than use a polymodeler more suitable for visual presentation.

I would like to see some dimension tools in Lw cad, to match solidworks dimension tools, they do change values according to changes you do, and it is so nicely presented on the drawing sheet as well, sketchup also has some nice dimension tools, but solidworks is a snap better.

And chippwalter, you could probably forget solidworks and so can many lightwave users do, those doing graphics and fx or viz stuff, solidworks is a different type of beast more aimed for computer aided design and mechanical parts which
also often requires drawing sheets and dimension tools to provide worksheet for physical testing, mounting and welding etc.

Michael

prometheus
01-04-2014, 02:46 PM
a basic simple introduction,solidworks in 10 minutes.
screws,hole wizard,shelling,drawings,components, dimension tools,stress analyze etc..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFy8iijJSHM

cool stuff in the end for preparing stress sheets, checking environment stress footprint matched against world wide charts, creating flattened sheets for laser cutting,
creating animatable exploding mounting presentations in a goo(painstakingly to do that in lightwave even though lightwave is a specific animation software,itīs just not designed to do such easy presentations)

spherical
01-04-2014, 03:56 PM
Be aware that Solidworks produces flawed STL files that will confuse or choke slicers that have a clue about what it means to be "manifold". Dumb slicers won't see these errors and will happily slice the file and then you get a Borked print and wonder why. When presenting the flawed STL to a mesh analyzer like Netfabb, it will see errors and try to fix them, but inject errors of its own and the problem gets worse. Only way to soundly fix them is to do it manually, as an automatic solution just doesn't exist that is as sophisticated as the human brain that can make intelligent decisions. So, you end up in Modeler anyway.

chippwalters
01-04-2014, 05:06 PM
And chippwalter, you could probably forget solidworks and so can many lightwave users do, those doing graphics and fx or viz stuff, solidworks is a different type of beast more aimed for computer aided design and mechanical parts which
also often requires drawing sheets and dimension tools to provide worksheet for physical testing, mounting and welding etc.
Michael

FormZ does all of that now. It keeps a history of where you've been so you can go back a few steps (though I suppose not as easily as SW) and exports to real CAD formats like STEP, SAT and IGES and also has the ability to create blueprints for drawings. Still, it really isn't *easy* to sketch out concepts.

Perhaps it's easier to think of it this way. FormZ and SolidWorks are like a drafting table with a drafting machine. You wouldn't use something like that to do 'concept sketches' but to rather document the design once completed.

To me, LW Modeler *may* have the ability to do concept work, just like in the above videos. It's all about workflow and ease of use and realtime feedback. There is no doubt Bulgarov can do it-- and I'm thinking maybe I can too. FWIW, 3D printers don't need the full-on CSG capabilities of engineering packages because eventually they're just printing polys.

Here's the final object created by Bulgarov. As you can see, it would be difficult to have built this in SW (or FormZ) in a couple hours, but he was able to knock it out-- including fabric folds and final rendering, in well under a day. HTH explains what I'm thinking.

Here's his final model from the video above:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/3788438/3D/vitaly-bulgarov-sloth-keyshot-blog-01.jpg

gristle
01-04-2014, 05:13 PM
Regarding more advanced modelling in SW, i was refering to thin walled parts for injection moulding, with draft etc. Yes, simple features like rounds/fillets are straightforward to change.

We've never had issues with sending our STLs generated in SW to our Stratasys FDM machine, or to external companies like 3D systems, who are making parts on SLS machines. Maybe the mesh deviation is too great? Or the modeller has used some dodgy techniques, like boundary surfaces with singularities. Maybe the software used by Stratasys and other rapid prototype vendors are more robust and can handle STLs that have issues?

Edit - sorry, when I was talking about references in SW, here is an example. In a sketch, change a spline to an arc. Now all things downstream in the model that reference the spline will fall over - they cannot find the reference. Finally in SW 2014 there is a replace reference tool. Took them a long time. Go PTC :)

chippwalters
01-04-2014, 05:17 PM
FWIW, I've only used SketchUp (surface modeler) and FormZ (solid modeler) and *BY FAR* the solid modeler has been easier for me to work with when 3D printing. I'll be doing some tests this weekend using LW Modeler (surface modeler) and we'll see how it works. Also, I've heard good things about Rhino (surface modeler) when it comes to 3D printing-- so it goes to show not all surface modelers are created equal!

Hey, does anyone know of a 'screw' or 'bolt' plugin where you can enter in dimensions and it creates the correct threaded object? TIA!

prometheus
01-04-2014, 07:09 PM
FWIW, I've only used SketchUp (surface modeler) and FormZ (solid modeler) and *BY FAR* the solid modeler has been easier for me to work with when 3D printing. I'll be doing some tests this weekend using LW Modeler (surface modeler) and we'll see how it works. Also, I've heard good things about Rhino (surface modeler) when it comes to 3D printing-- so it goes to show not all surface modelers are created equal!

Hey, does anyone know of a 'screw' or 'bolt' plugin where you can enter in dimensions and it creates the correct threaded object? TIA!

I think you said it right about the speed workflow for concept design, as you mentioned about being able to whip something up that fast in your previous post...however as always, what governs what tool to use isnīt firstly the fact
that you can whip up a concept design, I would state that it is the purpose and task ahead that governs what tool to use, so it doesnīt matter if you can work more fluent in polymodeler such as lightwave...If you need to work out
design or constructions that requries true accuracy based on physical properties of angles,leverage,and other specific properties, in such case you need to work out the dimensions based on the studies and mathematical calculations
needed for a tool to behave correctly once created, and thus a concept design software fall flat...other than it can create a visual feedback only..maybe as a rough sketch for something and for visual fx work, but a tool for creating
real life mechanics in everyday life, sports,industry tools...a polymodeler is not the way to go.

There are some exceptions, it could be tools that by themself should and can be defined by organic shape, such as devices forming based on the human figure etc, or other design objects to fit in a more organic environment, some environment design etc...in such cases a freeform modeler based on subpatch modeling might be ideal.

For your question, I think there is a nut and bolt plugin, maybe do a search in lightwave plugin site, try search bolt or nut..I have it somewhere tucked away, thereīs also a library of bolts premade.
otherwise buy solidworks:) and you get a library for that:)

Michael

- - - Updated - - -

here you go...commercial though
https://www.lightwave3d.com/assets/plugins/entry/quickbolt/
About surface modeler? is that a proper term for it, Isnīt lightwave a polymodeler?
Rhino works with solid and nurbs as I understand it, Ive tried it and it is great too.
Solidworks got subdivision model tools plugins from Npower, rhino and t-splines I think is similar, and I think pro-enginner works with subdivision too.
and moi I think you should try out too, thereīs two different demos, a trial that you can save out and test export to lightwave, but time limited, and then a trial that isnīt timelimited but cant save.

prometheus
01-04-2014, 07:19 PM
If I could afford a printer, and a scanner, I would probably scan my own foot, edit design it in lightwave and then create a mold, and then fill it with some gel or foam, to help the soles get some support or something, I have some constant pain under the foot and have been having for years...havenīt gone checked it properly at a doctor though.

Edit..maybe the old plaster method..and then fill that and carve it physicly could work, itīs way cheaper:)

Michael

IdotT
01-04-2014, 10:30 PM
I just started using Viacad. It uses the same geometric modeling kernel (ACIS) as solid edge, solid works and many other CAD programs. But is much more basic, I enjoy using it for a more mechanical feel to a design. You can export as obj into lightwave to render.