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View Full Version : Oregon 3d map data set



edmellnik
09-17-2013, 06:15 PM
I am looking for a model of Oregon with or without surfacing.
Anyone know where I can find that inexpensively?

Thanks
Ed

lertola2
09-17-2013, 10:36 PM
Not a lightwave model but you can download high resolution elevation data from this site: http://viewer.nationalmap.gov/viewer/. You will need some gis software to read it though.

edmellnik
09-18-2013, 09:58 AM
Those maps are viewable... but not sure how to grab them...
What is gis software?

jeric_synergy
09-18-2013, 10:41 AM
How detailed???

edmellnik
09-18-2013, 10:55 AM
I just want relief map no roads or lettering.
The travel program starts off looking at the whole state in relief with just a small amount on the edge of bordering states and ocean.
Then I just need to open each section with a part of the coastline which I would put the names of the cities over.
They could be stills of the Northern Oregon Coast, Central and Southern Oregon Coast......
but if the were animatable it would be nice. But that could be as easy as having enough resolution to do a slow zoom to each of those sections.
The only detail is the mountain relief and maybe a few rivers and lakes... but even that I could insert.

Slartibartfast
09-18-2013, 01:49 PM
I don't know if this is what you're after:
http://data.geocomm.com/catalog/US/61056/sublist.html
Many years ago I downloaded .dem-files and converted them to B/W images that I used as displacement maps. I think I wrote a program to do that, but I'm sure there is converters to download out there.
Anyway, they seem to have all sorts of maps now; raster images, LIDAR pointclouds etc. I didn't check it though since they require a login and I didn't bother to get one.

lertola2
09-19-2013, 07:18 AM
If you just want a gray scale or shaded relief image email me privately. I have a complete copy of the SRTM 3 arc second data and I can crop a piece that covers Oregon for you. Oregon should be about 10,000 pixels wide in that database.

If you need higher resolution the only source I know of is the website I linked to above. From that site you can get 1 arc second, 1/3 arc second and sometimes 1/9 arc second data. The only practical way to use that is with gis software. This is the standard software used by the mapping industry: http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis. It is expensive and has a steep learning curve.