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DonJMyers
08-03-2013, 11:50 AM
I'm not Mr. Nodal but even I was able to create a useful node texture: JUMBOVISION. Just plug in any bitmap image and the texture will separate it into red green and blue components. These are then offset and de-rezzed to create a very accurate led sign that can be used on any flat texture. And by accurate I mean it will create the same problems a real LED sign has: moire patterns. In fact it gives some really wild moire patterns if you don't render it at a high resolution. VPR preview renders will likewise have crazy moires that won't show up in the final image. The distance between each giant "pixel" can be tweaked for different looks or to minimize moire patterns. Just remember the moiré's are a natural function of the object and occur in real world digital videos of jumbotrons.

Just download the attached zip file and load the surface into lightwave. Should work with LW 9x-11x or at least whatever versions of LW have nodal textures.

Sample image attached.

Enjoy!

JohnMarchant
08-03-2013, 03:59 PM
Thanks Don, sure i will find a use for it later.

pinkmouse
08-04-2013, 05:18 AM
Thanks Don!

djwaterman
08-04-2013, 05:50 AM
That's gotta come in handy at some point.

COBRASoft
08-04-2013, 08:07 AM
As a LED salescompany, we know the moire problem very well :). LED has so many differences nowadays (pitch, quality, colors, arrangment of the LEDs, ...).

UnCommonGrafx
08-04-2013, 09:02 AM
And with compound nodes, Don, this is a great contribution to the moment.
Appreciate it.

Waves of light
08-04-2013, 10:25 AM
Thanks Don. Will have a play and see how it works.

DonJMyers
08-04-2013, 12:19 PM
As a LED salescompany, we know the moire problem very well :). LED has so many differences nowadays (pitch, quality, colors, arrangment of the LEDs, ...).

I copied the dot pitch and color arrangement of an LA LED that is only a few years old manufactured by Daktronics.

Greenlaw
08-04-2013, 01:56 PM
Don,

That's really cool! Will have to think up a project now just to use it. Thanks for sharing. :)

G.

COBRASoft
08-04-2013, 02:03 PM
I copied the dot pitch and color arrangement of an LA LED that is only a few years old manufactured by Daktronics.

Nowadays, you have a lot of SMD (single full-color LED) which produce up to 4000 nits (some even higher). The real outdoors e.g. P10 or P8 go up to 9000 nits and have a typical triangular placing of 3 LEDs (1R1G1B). In the early days you had 2 red, 1 green and 1 blue (2R1G1B) setups. In Amsterdam, I saw SMD of P1.9 (1.9mm distance between 2 LEDs) and the resolution was 4K (real LEDs). Simply amazing quality and price!

DonJMyers
08-04-2013, 03:31 PM
Nowadays, you have a lot of SMD (single full-color LED) which produce up to 4000 nits (some even higher). The real outdoors e.g. P10 or P8 go up to 9000 nits and have a typical triangular placing of 3 LEDs (1R1G1B).

A single full color pixel would look less dramatic methinks than the RGB arrangement. I thought NITS were louse eggs. How do they differ from lumens/kelvins?

One major battle for sign manufacturers must be the sun which washes the signs out badly even with a black backing.

DonJMyers
08-04-2013, 03:36 PM
And with compound nodes, Don, this is a great contribution to the moment.
Appreciate it.

Yes this moderately complex texture could be compounded easily into a much bigger nodal texture/system. It really is a nodal compositing system like DIGITAL FUSION except the output is sent to a texture, not the entire screen as is the case in compositing programs.

COBRASoft
08-04-2013, 05:02 PM
A single full color pixel would look less dramatic methinks than the RGB arrangement. I thought NITS were louse eggs. How do they differ from lumens/kelvins?

One major battle for sign manufacturers must be the sun which washes the signs out badly even with a black backing.

SMD has a hard time beating the sun, full RGB (seperate LEDs) displays are much better for direct sunlight. Nits are the same as lumens actually. You need at least 4000 for direct sunlight.
From 15 meters or more, SMD or full RGB doesn't matter that much for most people, they can't see the details thar an SMD can provide, but they can see the image quite clearly due to the lumens. A lot depends on the quality of the LEDs and controller chips used for the display.

DonJMyers
08-04-2013, 05:39 PM
Thanks Don. Will have a play and see how it works.

Try feeding a white bitmap into the first node and applying it on a huge texture. A huge texture you are lighting a scene with via radiosity. What does that look like?

Then push the dots much further apart. Make sure the dots are spaced evenly. Whatever that means. It's not my job to tell you whatever that means soldier! What do you get?

Do you get colored shadows in kooky grids? Grids of distantly spaced colored dots? Oh do tell.

If you can make the white input image work or be weird try other bitmaps or moving video. In a way you would be faking the LED lighting setups of some digitization shoots. Lighting with a weird texture of distantly spaced glowing LED dots expressed through radiosity that is.

lardbros
08-05-2013, 05:40 AM
Cool stuff... thanks Don!

This should be added to the new plugin/asset database methinks! :D

DonJMyers
08-05-2013, 11:14 AM
Cool stuff... thanks Don!

This should be added to the new plugin/asset database methinks! :D

Yeah I just need to know who to talk to do that :)