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View Full Version : SSD drive benefits for Lightwave user ???



digitaldoc
07-14-2013, 03:06 PM
Am I mistaken or does the addition or substitution of an SSD drive containing the OS and LW program files improve LW performance in any way except improved boot time?

pinkmouse
07-14-2013, 03:22 PM
Dunno. Are dynamics, radiosity and suchlike cached on disk or in memory?

JonW
07-14-2013, 07:13 PM
I does not help rendering but it does help responsiveness with disc work. Noticeable with Modelor. A lot more pleasurable to work with than my Velociraptors. You only need a small SSD for system & running current job. You can get one later & put your LW folder on it & run your current job & forget about the system. Store all the other stuff on standard HD.

If you have to reinstall LW keep a copy on the SSD ready to go. it is much quicker to reinstall than from HD.

shadowshifter
07-14-2013, 09:19 PM
The app will definitely run faster on the ssd. I haven't noticed any difference between having your files on the ssd as well or on the hdd, but it could be because I'm using MacLW and it's buggy and laggy with >240k poly models :)

Paul_Boland
07-15-2013, 10:38 AM
SSD's are FAST!! They are wickedly fast!! I love them for speed!! BUT... I personally have not invested in one for my computer because there are too many con's verses the pro's.
* Expensive compared to standard disc-spinning drives.
* Slow down after one year of continual use (yearly formatting and fresh installation of the OS are recommended).
* Slow down as they fill up.
* Limited lifetime of read/writes.
I can see SSD's being the future but these issues need to be ironed out first.

Waves of light
07-15-2013, 12:34 PM
SSD's are FAST!! They are wickedly fast!! I love them for speed!! BUT... I personally have not invested in one for my computer because there are too many con's verses the pro's.
* Expensive compared to standard disc-spinning drives.
* Slow down after one year of continual use (yearly formatting and fresh installation of the OS are recommended).
* Slow down as they fill up.
* Limited lifetime of read/writes.
I can see SSD's being the future but these issues need to be ironed out first.

Well, I did not know that about SSDs!

Ryan Roye
07-15-2013, 01:48 PM
While I don't think the largest benefit of SSDs are through Lightwave... they are well worth their price.

My recommendation:

1) Use a small-capacity SSD (80-120 gigs) as the primary drive where the OS and your programs get installed. This will GREATLY increase the snappiness of your computer when loading programs. These smaller SSD's aren't too bad price wise.

2) Use a regular hard drive for actual storage for where everything you do is saved... *especially* if you do a lot of video editing.

This way, you can take full advantage of SSD's speed boost, while still having the ability to fulfill any demands for storage capacity of the non-SSD drives. This also ensures you don't spend a boatload of money on a drive that isn't known for longevity (as noted in Paul's post above).

KurtF
07-15-2013, 01:56 PM
And for further study there's also these:

http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/SSD/PCIe/OWC/Mercury_Accelsior/RAID

SSD on a PCIE Board. Reputed to be very, very fast.

gravin
07-15-2013, 01:57 PM
SSD's are FAST!! They are wickedly fast!! I love them for speed!! BUT... I personally have not invested in one for my computer because there are too many con's verses the pro's.
* Expensive compared to standard disc-spinning drives.
* Slow down after one year of continual use (yearly formatting and fresh installation of the OS are recommended).
* Slow down as they fill up.
* Limited lifetime of read/writes.
I can see SSD's being the future but these issues need to be ironed out first.

I'm not sure but I think some of these Cons are no longer as much of an issue as they used to be. Price isn't terrible considering performance, could be better but the size to speed trade of per $ is acceptable if the SSD isn't going to be the only drive in your machine. Modern operating systems and SSD firmware provide solutions for the lose of write speed caused by filling up the SSD so the slow downs aren't as bad as they used to be. The lifetime of most SSD's are probably better then most consumer HHD's, you will probably replace your SSD with a faster device in 5 years anyway. Also with no moving parts SSD's should be much more reliable then traditional spinning disks but one should always make backups. Seriously if your not regularly backing up your data you should stop reading this and do it now, you will thank me later trust me... The only issue I ever had with my SSD was poor driver support for Trim on my last AMD motherboard but with a little work I was able to get it working. I would definitely still recommend doing a good bit of research before making a purchase but I think there a worthwhile investment.

DogBoy
07-15-2013, 04:02 PM
SSD's are FAST!! They are wickedly fast!! I love them for speed!! BUT... I personally have not invested in one for my computer because there are too many con's verses the pro's.
* Expensive compared to standard disc-spinning drives.
* Slow down after one year of continual use (yearly formatting and fresh installation of the OS are recommended).
* Slow down as they fill up.
* Limited lifetime of read/writes.
I can see SSD's being the future but these issues need to be ironed out first.

As has been said, that isn't really true anymore.


Expensive? Yes, guilty as charged, but much cheaper than they used to be
Slow Down after a year? That is a bit vague, but TRIM fixes a lot of those issues (Win 7 or later).
Slow down as they fill up. That is ridiculous, as HDDs suffer this much worse than SSDs do. Admittedly SSDs are smaller so fill faster, but I'd not use a SSD for data anyway. As for the yearly formatting/fresh install, that is true of all Windows PCs SSDs or not.
Limited Lifetime: yeah, bits wear out, but generally SSDs are over provisioned (240GB drive normally are more like 256GB, but the extra is used for when cells wear out) and also use algorithms to spread wear. The fact is the warrantys on SSDs are the same as for normal drives, and I have yet to have to RMA a SSD in the last 2 years, whereas I've sent at least 3 HDDs back.

digitaldoc
07-15-2013, 04:19 PM
I had an 80 GB SSD on my original Intel i7 980x 3.33 GHz 6 core 16GB RAM Dual ATI Radeon 5850 Win 7 64 system and within 6 months it would consistently show 90-98% full even though I tried to keep only Windows on the drive. All my Programs files were on the D drive and data files on the C drive.

Recently I upgraded to a 500 GB SSD transferring the only C drive to the new SSD. New programs have been added to the SSD boot drive, notably all the Adobe CC apps. The Adobe CS5 apps and still on the old drive D.

By moving my media cache for After Effects (and the other CC apps) to the SSD I have noticed a remarkable boost in performance in that program.

I have not really noticed any difference with Lightwave, but it has always run well on my 6 core, 12 thread system.

I basically asked the question to compare experience as SSD's have been recommended to those building new systems and I wanted to see what the general experience has been.

Thanks for the feedback.