PDA

View Full Version : RH Rigging Tutorials... Version 2!



RebelHill
06-17-2013, 04:44 AM
So guys...

Turns out I've been beavering away in the dark here at creating a new, swanky, updated set of rigging training to replace my (now 4 year old) RHR series. With all new organisation, tricks and content, it promises to improve upon the previous release, continuing to offer the best rigging training available for LW. Go take a peek...

http://rebelhill.net/html/rhr.html

It also turns out that I have been working on this lil fella for a few months now, but have kept on getting distracted by other stuff, so... with a good bulk of it done now, I'm putting it up for pre-release.

The first chapter, Foundations, is being offered FREE, as this is info that, imo, everyone should have access to, and all should know back to front and inside out. This chapter contains over 3hrs of detailed, in depth info on the LW environment and rigging theory in general. It's really good (I hope) and I'm sure that there's a lot for all to be gained from it.

As for the remaining chapters...

They are well underway, and in the interests of not getting distracted, and lighting a fire under my behind, I've decided to offer up a "pre-order" for the series, which is going at a special discounted price until final release. Ordinarily, I'm not into pre-order stuff, but I figure that I can increase my motivation to get finished by... 1: having paid up customers waiting/nagging... 2: having it on special means the sooner I get it done, the sooner I can charge full price. See... incentives! Also, those who do pre-buy will receive the original RHR set in the meantime (and this'll also be your last chance to get that set, as it will be retired afterwards).

A great many of you of course bought the original version of RHR, and there is an upgrade price available for you to get the new set... I'm sure you're gonna love this one even more than the last. Also... RHR has continued in popularity, right up until the present, and I hate for more recent buyers to feel they've missed out on something, so...

If you bought the original RHR since the start of this year (2013), DO NOT buy the new version... you will receive it as a free upgrade!

Ok... there we go.

Cheers all. :thumbsup:

BigHache
06-17-2013, 05:33 AM
Awesome! I'll be upgrading this weekend. :)

RebelHill
06-17-2013, 05:49 AM
Awesome! I'll be upgrading this weekend. :)

Groovy.

You know... I never told you this, but you're the spitting image of a friend of mine, Matt. Every time I see a post from you I clock your avatar and think... "wtf, when did Matt join this board??"

Every time...

VonBon
06-17-2013, 08:32 AM
For the people who have the old Rigging tutorials, what "new" things will you cover in this series?

RebelHill
06-17-2013, 08:54 AM
For the people who have the old Rigging tutorials, what "new" things will you cover in this series?

Well...

New organisation... The explanations and coverage of the various tools and systems in the original, seem to me looking back at least, a bit muddled in places. So the re-structuring should, I hope, make a lot of things clearer and easier to understand, especially how the tools work in isolation and the lil tricks you can pull off with each, as well as how they interract. Obviously you can't do a tut for every possible rigging challenge a person may face, so there's a much more focussed attempt to try and present the tools and workflows that'll help folk find their own way around and invent their own systems as they need them.

New tools... LW has, ofc, had new tools added to its set in the past 4 years, plus updates or alterations to pre-existing ones... so these will all be covered. Including, obviously enough... Genoma. In particular I'll be diving deeper into the innards of Genoma... none of this "add a few insect legs, weld to a root, boom, u got a spider" type thing... but much more a look at how the base systems work, and how you can tweak and fiddle them in some more creative ways to pull off special tricks, make Genoma rigs that are more animation friendly (a BIG issue imo), and build your own custom systems over the top of what Genoma produces to extend its functionality.

New projects... Previously we just had the 2 character rigs (which in a lot of ways was like 1 rig done in 2 slightly different styles). This series will, ofc, contain walkthroughs for building whole characters, but will also take on different projects for how to rig different things, mechanical objects, etc... The aim being to give a much more rounded view of the tools in action and showing how they can be applied in either the same sorta, or different and varied ways for different needs.

Not to mention some new and varied techniques and workflows that Ive discovered or put together these past years... I may be pretty good at this stuff, doesnt mean Im not always learning myself though.

tonybliss
06-17-2013, 09:35 AM
excellent

stiff paper
06-17-2013, 09:41 AM
Is it all LWIK now? (No PLG?)

Also, will you share any insights about things like JointMorphPlus?

RebelHill
06-17-2013, 11:42 AM
There will be notes on plgIK, as it still works and still has some uses... but it wont be featuring as a "major" tool as it did previously... so yeah... pretty much its gonna be ALL native LW for the most part.

As for joint morphing... yep, there's stuff on not just that tool, but the general practice of applying compensation morfs to rigs also.

BigHache
06-17-2013, 07:20 PM
Groovy.

You know... I never told you this, but you're the spitting image of a friend of mine, Matt. Every time I see a post from you I clock your avatar and think... "wtf, when did Matt join this board??"

Every time...

Interesting! I've been told that or something similar quite a few times recently. Either I have one of those faces or... I'm a clone!

Davewriter
06-17-2013, 07:41 PM
My very good Sir! How wonderfully Kool of you!
I'll be looking forward to the update with great relish... or mustard.
THANKS!

hrgiger
06-17-2013, 08:07 PM
Excellent. Thanks RH.

BokadCastle
06-17-2013, 08:47 PM
Well...

... none of this "add a few insect legs, weld to a root, boom, u got a spider" type thing...

Love that part, got a real chuckle out of it...:D

Ok, I'm on board for the pre-order.

Kryslin
06-17-2013, 11:48 PM
upgrade order away...

Hail
06-18-2013, 04:23 AM
"Eggcellent" work RH!

prometheus
06-18-2013, 12:46 PM
Again..many thanks rebel hill for these videos, as you know I commented on youtube about me having problems with reading the buttons due to the resolution or compression.

Youre quite right about the comparison between your 720HD and mine at 720, I was looking at my version which was 1080HD which is considerable better, understandable if you can not record them at that size due to record limitations or so.
why donīt you try the vimeo channel? I think that generally gives better end results anyway.

Check the image for your 720 compared to mine 720 and also my 1080 resolution.

114998

Videos from the official Lightwave channel looks better though even if in 720..(Lino), but I think they have
a different screen resolution when recording those.

Michael

m.d.
06-18-2013, 01:11 PM
Sounds great....appreciate the first part already....

May I just make one request for the training Craig?

I would like to see/run through a walk cycle/run/jump/whatever animation....finished to production quality in the training.

The reason being, it's nice to see the tools implemented in the workflow....not just an overview of tools and concepts. And there are a lot of little tricks you may have, say inside the graph editor or whatnot that you may take for granted that all LWers know, that in actual fact a lot of people may be oblivious to.
I realize this is not a animation course....but a rigging one, but it sure would be appreciated if we could have a quick 1/2hr run through to see your techniques.

Sadly most lightwave animation tutorials I can ever recall feature at best a very crude final product.

RebelHill
06-19-2013, 05:47 AM
I would like to see/run through a walk cycle/run/jump/whatever animation....finished to production quality in the training.

Ok, so this is a tricky one... but also something I fully understand the desire for... so let me try and give a very complete answer.

First off, as you note yourself, there's things in the graph editor, tools techniques, key management... you name it. This can plainly be a tutorial series in and of itself in many ways. One thing that I hope is obvious if you see my various tuts, is that I dislike doing half-baked, bits of things type training... Im into giving the FULL picture of things or nothing at all because I feel any less is only selling folks short. Its like teaching someone to drive and glossing over the gear changes.

Further to this, once you get past the details of LWs animation system tools, there's something else very important to consider... The Rig!

As I try to make clear in this new rigging series, the rig itself IS an animation tool, nothing more, and this means that rigs can be designed different ways to allow for (or preclude) different styles of, or approaches to, the task of animation. Take the two different IK knees in the "What is rigging video", the process of creating a walk cycle with those two rigs is going to be different as the "behaviours" are different and you will therefore need to manage different controls in different ways. This ofc gos back to my own long running assertion that one of the most important things to do if you're rigging for many (as clearly I am doing with tools such as RHiggit) is that you try to create the most "industry standard" rigs possible so that animators arent having to learn a totally different "tool" to simply go from one character to another.

But also one of the things Im attempting to do better in this rigging training vs the last version, is to demonstrate the versatility of rigging options, how decisions about the fundamental structure have influence on the final "character tool" itself and the ways it which it can (or in some cases cant) be manipulated by an animator, much more than trying to teach a single rig for folks to follow and copy slavishly. Doing so will be of no help when such folks are later confronted with somewhat "individualised" characters and have to think for themselves, design their own systems, etc.

Clearly, the two disciplines are interconnected though by all these facts... A good rigger ABSOLUTELY needs to understand the process of animation and the needs of an animator when it comes to predictably posing and controling a chartacter over time so that he can build the most animator friendly (not to mention workflow efficient) setups possible. This, ofc, also goes the other way to some extent... animators dont need to understand rigging anywhere near as deeply, but they do need to have a basic idea of what the rigger has tried to do for them, and how he has designed the controls and systems (which goes back to the standardised rig ideas I mentioned already).

But even ignoring ALL of that, there's then the process of animation itself (irrespective of the tools or medium). Folks always ask to learn something "easy"... like a walk cycle... but, y'know what... Walk cycles ARE NOT all THAT easy. Sure the key structure, repetitiveness of the motion, that's not such a big deal... but walks themselves (at least well animated ones as such you mention) have a LOT going on. there's all kinds of body mechanics to understand, flow, timing, spacing... I can do a walkthrough (no pun intended) of such a cycle, and have the final result look really nice, but without a full explanation of WHY certain frame spacings are being used, or a hip is being moved this far/that high/etc... you will ultimately learn NOTHING about how to CRAFT pretty looking animation, only how to copy that one particular instance.

Again... animation is a whole subject unto itself.

If you hadnt guessed by now... this whole dialogue of mine is nothing more than a verbose "no" in response to your request... I hope that considering these points though, you can understand why.

This series WILL cover various issues and ideas about control systems, to help folks THINK the way a rigger needs to, with animation as the ultimate goal in mind, but it will be focussed entirely on this craft, rather than taking less helpful forays into the other.

Ofc, I do recognice the need and desire folk seem to have for better instruction on animation, either in general, or more specific to LW itself. Its all well and good taking any resource you like that teaches how to animate "on paper", but users clearly want to have resources available that take such things from an LW perspective, showing good methods and workflows for using the tools therein.

As such, it may well be something that I can look to producing at a later date, and I am sure that such a thing would increase, and support everything taught in the rigging training. For the time being though... its this training that's gonna be the main focus, the other could be a possibility later, provided, ofc, that there's sufficient demand for such a thing.

VermilionCat
06-19-2013, 06:50 AM
Thanks, RH. I appreciate your effort and am eager for the release!

chikega
06-19-2013, 12:02 PM
Awesome! Your training is the best out there. And thank you for being such a gent (free upgrade for recent purchasers)! :D

omichon
06-19-2013, 01:51 PM
Great news RH ! I really have enjoyed all of your training so far.
Thanks also for your clever marketing :)

Ryan Roye
06-19-2013, 06:22 PM
Clearly, the two disciplines are interconnected though by all these facts... A good rigger ABSOLUTELY needs to understand the process of animation and the needs of an animator when it comes to predictably posing and controling a chartacter over time so that he can build the most animator friendly (not to mention workflow efficient) setups possible.

We don't agree on many things, but this is one instance where I couldn't agree more. A lot of people go into rigging without knowing the ins and outs of movement in general... the reason why so many people suggest working with 2d animation first is that the whole idea of working with rigs gets in the way with learning how things should move.

I would be very interested to see how one approaches teaching 3d animation with emphasis on motion rather than rigging. This is actually something I think is lacking in 3d tutorials in general, so there's a ton of potential for generated interest you got here!

IE: teaching/showing the idea that almost all character animation is entirely driven by rotations, and how that influences how all living creatures with legs/arms move.

m.d.
06-19-2013, 08:37 PM
Ok, so this is a tricky one... but also something I fully understand the desire for... so let me try and give a very complete answer.

First off, as you note yourself, there's things in the graph editor, tools techniques, key management... you name it. This can plainly be a tutorial series in and of itself in many ways. One thing that I hope is obvious if you see my various tuts, is that I dislike doing half-baked, bits of things type training... Im into giving the FULL picture of things or nothing at all because I feel any less is only selling folks short. Its like teaching someone to drive and glossing over the gear changes.

Further to this, once you get past the details of LWs animation system tools, there's something else very important to consider... The Rig!

As I try to make clear in this new rigging series, the rig itself IS an animation tool, nothing more, and this means that rigs can be designed different ways to allow for (or preclude) different styles of, or approaches to, the task of animation. Take the two different IK knees in the "What is rigging video", the process of creating a walk cycle with those two rigs is going to be different as the "behaviours" are different and you will therefore need to manage different controls in different ways. This ofc gos back to my own long running assertion that one of the most important things to do if you're rigging for many (as clearly I am doing with tools such as RHiggit) is that you try to create the most "industry standard" rigs possible so that animators arent having to learn a totally different "tool" to simply go from one character to another.

But also one of the things Im attempting to do better in this rigging training vs the last version, is to demonstrate the versatility of rigging options, how decisions about the fundamental structure have influence on the final "character tool" itself and the ways it which it can (or in some cases cant) be manipulated by an animator, much more than trying to teach a single rig for folks to follow and copy slavishly. Doing so will be of no help when such folks are later confronted with somewhat "individualised" characters and have to think for themselves, design their own systems, etc.

Clearly, the two disciplines are interconnected though by all these facts... A good rigger ABSOLUTELY needs to understand the process of animation and the needs of an animator when it comes to predictably posing and controling a chartacter over time so that he can build the most animator friendly (not to mention workflow efficient) setups possible. This, ofc, also goes the other way to some extent... animators dont need to understand rigging anywhere near as deeply, but they do need to have a basic idea of what the rigger has tried to do for them, and how he has designed the controls and systems (which goes back to the standardised rig ideas I mentioned already).

But even ignoring ALL of that, there's then the process of animation itself (irrespective of the tools or medium). Folks always ask to learn something "easy"... like a walk cycle... but, y'know what... Walk cycles ARE NOT all THAT easy. Sure the key structure, repetitiveness of the motion, that's not such a big deal... but walks themselves (at least well animated ones as such you mention) have a LOT going on. there's all kinds of body mechanics to understand, flow, timing, spacing... I can do a walkthrough (no pun intended) of such a cycle, and have the final result look really nice, but without a full explanation of WHY certain frame spacings are being used, or a hip is being moved this far/that high/etc... you will ultimately learn NOTHING about how to CRAFT pretty looking animation, only how to copy that one particular instance.

Again... animation is a whole subject unto itself.

If you hadnt guessed by now... this whole dialogue of mine is nothing more than a verbose "no" in response to your request... I hope that considering these points though, you can understand why.

This series WILL cover various issues and ideas about control systems, to help folks THINK the way a rigger needs to, with animation as the ultimate goal in mind, but it will be focussed entirely on this craft, rather than taking less helpful forays into the other.

Ofc, I do recognice the need and desire folk seem to have for better instruction on animation, either in general, or more specific to LW itself. Its all well and good taking any resource you like that teaches how to animate "on paper", but users clearly want to have resources available that take such things from an LW perspective, showing good methods and workflows for using the tools therein.

As such, it may well be something that I can look to producing at a later date, and I am sure that such a thing would increase, and support everything taught in the rigging training. For the time being though... its this training that's gonna be the main focus, the other could be a possibility later, provided, ofc, that there's sufficient demand for such a thing.


Hehe...a rather long winded NO!

I appreciate the effort and the thoroughness you put into your training, and totally understand your reason for not wanting to do this at this time.

I have done a fair bit of character animation in maya and motionbuilder (was trained in Maya years ago) and found doing roto animation of a character fairly easy, and it came naturally....
Those skills I had...never really transferred over into Lightwave....and I haven't done character animation in years...partly because I have been busy with other projects, going beyond the scope of just 3d, and the general frustration when I had to jump into LW character animation when coming from a Maya background.

I have seen some good quality animations done in LW, but never have seen anyone demonstrate one via tutorial, at least not any that are of decent production quality realism (apologies to those that have....I obviously haven't seen everything)
And sadly, apart from the occasional newtek tutorial....you are really the only one out there putting stuff out with any volume and quality. (again there are others.....but not many)

Lightwave training is probably the least represented of all the major packages...without a doubt.

photoguy1278
06-19-2013, 11:06 PM
This is great news. Thank you for your contributions and care. I'm new to this LW community but I see the number of legit endorsements from the community of your work. I will be ordering as well and I would also like to humbly join in the request for RH animation tutorial sets.
Best,
Josh

BigHache
06-20-2013, 08:59 PM
OK! Incentivised and anxiously awaiting new tutorials. :D

kfinla
06-20-2013, 09:42 PM
Will there be much coverage of the Genoma muscle and tendon bones, and any beyond whats comes in the box augments to them?

RebelHill
06-22-2013, 04:53 AM
Will there be much coverage of the Genoma muscle and tendon bones, and any beyond whats comes in the box augments to them?

There shall be some... sure... But these genoma tedon/muscle things are basically nothing more than stretchy bones, and in the main to that regard Im showing more how to get the best out of such, and where they can and cant come in useful.

Kryslin
06-22-2013, 06:20 AM
Will there be any more of the workarounds for the deferred motions bug, which is still present in 11.5.1?

BigHache
06-22-2013, 04:26 PM
OK something I would like to learn to rig is eyelid deformations across an eye, especially for a cartoony character. I don't know if that's something that would be in line with this series but that's for you to decide.

vector
06-23-2013, 05:23 AM
OK something I would like to learn to rig is eyelid deformations across an eye, especially for a cartoony character. I don't know if that's something that would be in line with this series but that's for you to decide.


I bought time ago the Jonny Gorden book about rigging: very old because LW has improved a lot of things but very useful for others. But...Could it help you how he rigs the eyelids? (http://books.google.es/books?id=UTQkKqSJMykC&pg=PA135&lpg=PA135&dq=eyelids+lightwave+character&source=bl&ots=gZ_26Wq-Id&sig=HeXPyWbNDA2T6l7RLRhybGBxlVg&hl=en&sa=X&ei=GNrGUaPHAaiN7Abvm4DgBw&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=eyelids%20lightwave%20character&f=false)

allabulle
06-25-2013, 08:23 AM
I just bought the upgrade too.

By the way, BigHache's request about eyelids is indeed a nice suggestion.

jwiede
06-25-2013, 01:33 PM
I just bought the upgrade too.

By the way, BigHache's request about eyelids is indeed a nice suggestion.

Agreed! Eyelids are always a finicky problem area for me, esp. trying to show someone's closed-lid eye movements (as if asleep) under the eyelids.

RebelHill
06-26-2013, 12:10 PM
Cartoon eyelids... sure. Can work as a demonstration of weightmap methods... so I can include that easy enough.

Cheers.

allabulle
06-26-2013, 01:30 PM
nice!

chikega
07-11-2013, 09:52 PM
Craig, I'm viewing the current rigging video tutorials ... should I just disregard the plg_IK videos?

omichon
07-14-2013, 10:42 AM
Craig, any chance to see a full book rig (not just flipping pages on an open book) ?
It would be more than welcome !

RebelHill
07-18-2013, 10:43 AM
plgIK... ahh... depends, its a tool that does still have some uses, so its worth checking out and knowing, but also no biggie to ignore either.

Full book rig... its certainly another interesting case study. I may try to fit it in if it somehow fits well... but Ive got now quite a LOT of examples of this that or the other going in already... so not so sure.

allabulle
07-18-2013, 06:00 PM
Book rig, book rig... Yes, that would be nice and immensely useful. Yet, anyway, back to the tutorial making please; chop-chop!

mataori
09-04-2013, 12:42 AM
I'm excited about it.When will it be ready?

RebelHill
09-04-2013, 06:51 AM
Hmmm, yeah... Where did I leave those things... must be round here somewhere...

...

spherical
09-04-2013, 06:42 PM
I've decided to offer up a "pre-order" for the series, which is going at a special discounted price until final release.

Got a Quidditch Pitch sized idea on how long this window might be? We have our dedicated server to pay for and am considering upgrading my partner's LW seat, perhaps with ChronoScript and NevronMotion, so this month and probably next--maybe the next as well--will be a bit thin, to say the least. In the mean time, I'll need to get up to speed on the first chapter and RHiggit! to get my feet wet. Thanks for this opportunity.

RebelHill
09-04-2013, 10:09 PM
very thin now I fear

omichon
09-07-2013, 02:13 AM
Just in case you missed it : http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?137535-RH-Rigging-Training-for-LW3D

Megalodon2.0
09-07-2013, 02:51 AM
Ordered!

Looking forward to this. Maybe I'll actually get to some real rigging. ;)

jeric_synergy
09-09-2013, 08:47 PM
re Book Rigs: was that incredible Maya book rig coded by a mortal, or a Serious MEL Wizard?