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digitaldoc
05-17-2013, 02:27 PM
I've been asked to quote on a short animation, basically a humorous "turn your cell phones off" piece, to be shown at a local theater, 30 sec +/-.

I've never rendered for film size projection. 2K, 4K?

Any tips from someone with experience would be helpful.

Thanks

shrox
05-17-2013, 02:40 PM
I'm listening too.

jrandom
05-17-2013, 04:29 PM
A lot of films are finished at 2K, which surprised me -- I would have expected 4K to be the norm. This means that as long as you aggressively set your AA settings to get rid of any jagged edges, 2K will probably be just fine.

JonW
05-17-2013, 04:34 PM
Me to!



A stack of CPUs for a start or render farm. 30 seconds x 24 fps x 1 hour per frame (if it is very simple stuff) + don't under estimate the work involved in designing & building a scene + trials & errors + test rendering.

jrandom
05-17-2013, 04:44 PM
30 seconds x 24 fps x 1 hour per frame (if it is very simple stuff)

Which calculates to 1 month of render time if using a single machine. Render farms will be your best friend. :)

LW_Will
05-17-2013, 04:54 PM
I would've thought this too.

However, Jimmy Neutron, the first Newtek show for theatrical projection (that I'm aware of) had a strange ratio... something like 1480x920? So, if you want to do 1080p, should work. 'Course, I think that the final output for Jimmy was more to match the used frame recorder's resolution... but, not so sure?

raw-m
05-18-2013, 01:52 AM
Do it at 2k res. As an aside, I remember reading somewhere that the Battlestar Gallactica stuff is all 720p and up scaled to 1080p in post - that looks pretty good!

stiff paper
05-18-2013, 02:16 AM
You should ask them how they want it delivering at the end. That should give you some pretty big clues. Are they expecting you to give them an image sequence? A .mov file? Is it a small, old school movie theater and they're expecting you to hand them a reel of (gasp!) film?

2k is definitely enough. All movies used to have their VFX work done at 2K in the early 2000s and nobody ever complained about the lack of res.

stobbs
05-18-2013, 03:15 AM
We did a 30s animated cinema ad about 3 years ago and the company that made the film print requested a 1920x1080 tif sequence. One possible issue we were made aware of is that fast moving objects, near to the camera can produce more of a strobing/flickering effect when viewed on a cinema screen than when viewed on a monitor - you dont want to wait until the preview screening to find this out so make sure you use motion blur.

Render farms are great as long as they fall within your budget...

JonW
05-18-2013, 03:45 AM
We did a 30s animated cinema ad about 3 years ago and the company that made the film print requested a 1920x1080 tif sequence. One possible issue we were made aware of is that fast moving objects, near to the camera can produce more of a strobing/flickering effect when viewed on a cinema screen than when viewed on a monitor - you dont want to wait until the preview screening to find this out so make sure you use motion blur.

Render farms are great as long as they fall within your budget...

Good point with motion blur, just looking at some of the good fast action stuff on our forum, by some of our Gurus!. I have looked at a few frame by frame & there is an absolute stack of motion blur in some of the dramatic scenes! When you look at the film normally you are not really aware of the actual extent of MB. Unfortunately more render time!

& as pointed out they will most likely want a Tiff sequence! I had to supply Tiffs for a couple of sequences years ago, luckily a small size.

DonJMyers
05-21-2013, 11:21 PM
I've worked on lots of movies and we rendered out as targas. They have good color depth. 1920x1080 should be fine and fits the hd tv aspect ratio.

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I've worked on lots of movies and we rendered out as targas. They have good color depth. 1920x1080 should be fine and fits the hd tv aspect ratio.

silkroadgame
05-22-2013, 01:24 AM
I think you can get better result in 4k.

djwaterman
05-22-2013, 01:53 AM
2K is enough. Even if they ask for 4K do it at 2 and then up-rez it. They won't know the difference. You have to be realistic and 4K will take more time and eat away your budget.