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prometheus
05-04-2013, 05:03 AM
If you do have information and know links to different space agencyīs Blue prints/skethes of how a potentional
Mars Space Craft will be designed, please share the links or images here.

You can also put your own designs in here, but try and keep em with respect towards that they should connect with practical ideas that might actually
work.

And by all means, provide notes on what will be the most crucial to survive the journey to Mars...new technology that might need to be engineered etc.
Also of interest would be how the Mars complex would be build and look like to give a sustainable environment for those who only getīs a one way ticket.

Just for fun and whatever the outcome will be of concept graphics.

shrox
05-04-2013, 09:35 AM
I restarted "Mars Awaits" last week. I lost all the files in my HD crash last year. I'll post a pic later or tomorrow.

prometheus
05-04-2013, 09:50 AM
I restarted "Mars Awaits" last week. I lost all the files in my HD crash last year. I'll post a pic later or tomorrow.

cool..
I hope you have a backup external drive or something now?....and make backups regulary.

I had a crash too some years ago..under win xp system.
I installed a new hard drive and tried to acess the other crashed drive..but with no luck since windows didnīt recognize the drive as a valid formated drive and couldnīt read it at all...
so I ran stellar phoenix recovery, and It could read all the files and extract out what I wanted from the scanned image..even though windows by default couldnīt read it.

http://www.stellarinfo.com/disk-recovery.htm

Michael

shrox
05-04-2013, 09:59 AM
cool..
I hope you have a backup external drive or something now?....and make backups regulary.

I had a crash too some years ago..under win xp system.
I installed a new hard drive and tried to acess the other crashed drive..but with no luck since windows didnīt recognize the drive as a valid formated drive and couldnīt read it at all...
so I ran stellar phoenix recovery, and It could read all the files and extract out what I wanted from the scanned image..even though windows by default couldnīt read it.

http://www.stellarinfo.com/disk-recovery.htm

Michael

It crashed DURING backup to an external drive, all lost.

prometheus
05-04-2013, 10:14 AM
It crashed DURING backup to an external drive, all lost.

Huh..thatīs not how it should work, but as in life in general..**** happens:)

I hope the traveling team to mars gets super computers with fail safe operating system, (how that now would ever be possible)
Maybe they need to have 1 or two backup systems, that can take over instantly when the main system fails or shuts down for some reason.


Michael

prometheus
05-04-2013, 10:25 AM
Dutch company Mars one, dailymail article...
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2312857/Applications-open-way-trip-Mars-Mission-calls-couple-willing-cooped-501-day-trip.html

the test station in moscow...
http://www.google.se/imgres?safe=off&hl=sv&biw=1600&bih=736&tbm=isch&tbnid=8wAc2bHwN4tooM:&imgrefurl=http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20927984.600-first-humans-set-to-land-on-mars-sort-of.html&docid=6qJ-OSgGlWQo-M&imgurl=http://www.newscientist.com/data/images/archive/2798/27984601.jpg&w=823&h=539&ei=ajWFUd3nDuK54ASC3YGQCQ&zoom=1&ved=1t:3588,r:99,s:0,i:387&iact=rc&dur=1268&page=5&tbnh=180&tbnw=278&start=95&ndsp=25&tx=133&ty=30

The timeline schedule for a mars trip according to Mars one seems a bit too optimistic, just a few years ahead.

shrox
05-04-2013, 10:59 AM
Here is what I had before the HD died.


https://vimeo.com/10762723

prometheus
05-04-2013, 11:28 AM
Yeah...thatīs nice shrox.
The shuttle departure and landing..Whatīs the thoughts about that may I ask? wouldnīt that
be hazardly with such landing?
Did you approach the scene with a scientific approach or just a cool looking approach? :)

Just of curiousity to follow up, the shuttle rides beneath the main carrier vessel, you might think that a landing pod/vessel should be protected and encased
in a cargo room until point of landing.

Michael

shrox
05-04-2013, 11:41 AM
Yeah...thatīs nice shrox.
The shuttle departure and landing..Whatīs the thoughts about that may I ask? wouldnīt that
be hazardly with such landing?
Did you approach the scene with a scientific approach or just a cool looking approach? :)

Just of curiousity to follow up, the shuttle rides beneath the main carrier vessel, you might think that a landing pod/vessel should be protected and encased
in a cargo room until point of landing.

Michael

The drop ship uses an inflatable parasail for landing. The Martian atmosphere is too thin for the dropship itself to descend all the way to the surface safely. It's also part of an active Mars colony, the parts of the dropship are disassembled for surface use, or packed for return on an ascent craft, a vehicle kind of like the DC-X Clipper.
114103

You can see the landing in this video at the 13 second mark. It was a promo vid I was working on of my work.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VOt434KxLYU

prometheus
05-04-2013, 12:05 PM
Ahh...interesting style of landing, guess it would require something like robot modules preparing a landing area before though?
quite decent looking dust trails with hvīs there.

Michael

cresshead
05-05-2013, 06:08 AM
Various Models used for Venus Rises.


lander and rover
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Lander
114119

asteroid mining ship
114120

Mars outpost
114121

I do detest the lack of inline graphics in this new forum it's awful, really is.

another shot of the mars rovers and the colony dome in the background.
114122

prometheus
05-05-2013, 08:00 AM
I do detest the lack of inline graphics in this new forum it's awful, really is.

..

Do you mean inserting images that shows more than thumbnails? In that case I agree..it sucks, cant seem to get a proper insert of images either, and then we have the gallery
thumbs missing still after how long?


Thanks for the samples.

I wonder if it could be suitable to create cranes or rails that can be rotated wich small vehicles or robots can use, expandable and at the end a pillar that can flip out attaching to the ground, this
way colonist can research areas without having to drive through rocks ..maybe not useful?

Michael

cresshead
05-05-2013, 12:09 PM
someone on the lightwave skypes says this works

rh click the image in question once it's popped up and copy image url

now go back to your post

type then paste in the code then type


http://forums.newtek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=114122&d=1367756804

http://forums.newtek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=114121&d=1367755832

http://forums.newtek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=114119&d=1367755610

prometheus
05-05-2013, 12:17 PM
Cresshead...I have no doubt on that it will work, sure...but energy effective and also with respect to not interfere/destroy the environment?
I though it would be better to have rails crossing the terrain and only pick up samples where needed, also driving such huge vehicles must require more energy than applying robots and smaller rail vehicles sliding
along a rail..perhaps even driven by human force that also allows for the Mars team to work out at the same time:)

Michael

cresshead
05-05-2013, 01:01 PM
Cresshead...I have no doubt on that it will work, sure...but energy effective and also with respect to not interfere/destroy the environment?
I though it would be better to have rails crossing the terrain and only pick up samples where needed, also driving such huge vehicles must require more energy than applying robots and smaller rail vehicles sliding
along a rail..perhaps even driven by human force that also allows for the Mars team to work out at the same time:)

Michael

you're limited by a rail system and all the ground work to put a rail system in place is far more disruptive and costly, would require more manpower and resources. plus you can't go "anywhere" and are limited so shallow inclines for a rail system.

Mars being just 1/3 gravity means that large transport is more efficient as they weigh 66% less in relative terms for electric propulsion to move them.

for exploring: a wheeled transport is the obvious route to take.
for connecting dome habitats a rail system is maybe a better option or just a pressurised travel tube where people can cycle in it.

prometheus
05-05-2013, 01:13 PM
you're limited by a rail system and all the ground work to put a rain system in place is far more disruptive and costly, would require more manpower and resources.

Mars being just 1/3 gravity means that large transport is more efficient as they weigh 66% in relative terms for electric propulsion to move them.

The rail system isnīt intended to be attached on the ground, it goes out in the air from one module.
Uhhmm...this is where I should model the rail system to show what I had in mind, the rail system will originate from a center module or compund or mobile vehicle, and from there it can extend
like a firescape ladder and it is also rotational in 360 degree plus some options for pitching if needed, this wouldnīt require any ground work at all so Im not sure you are right about that.
Ive been wondering why they insist on having rovers trying to move on the ground only to get stuck in some cases as it has, the rails system I talk about can move freely (withing the limits of the construction work of course)

Ive also been thinking about why they havenīt thought of a sort of pole and grid system, from where a module shoots out poles or other modules which by themself can raise a pole high up in the air
and then extend some parachute arms that covers large areas.

of course Im sure some guys must have thought of that but probably come to a conclusion that it wouldnt work or be effective somehow, but still ..cant stop wondering.

yes good to hear some hard gravity facts:) the gravity wont stop smaller modules from getting stuck in the ground between pebbles and crumples though.

Michael

shrox
05-05-2013, 01:13 PM
Here are some of my Mars images from a decade ago...

http://web.archive.org/web/20010224084635/http://www.shrox.com/mars.htm

prometheus
05-05-2013, 01:19 PM
Here are some of my Mars images from a decade ago...

http://web.archive.org/web/20010224084635/http://www.shrox.com/mars.htm

I like the second image there:) california republic and all home cosy with flamingos and christmas tree...makes you think that a one way ticket aint so bad:)

cresshead
05-05-2013, 02:24 PM
http://web.archive.org/web/20020623153749/http://www.shrox.com/OverView1.JPG

i like this one!

one of the unrealistic things in my shots is the rubber tyres as such things will be too heavy to transport there for the rocket cost unless you grow your own rubber trees in bio domes and tap the rubber...as for having inflatable tyres...no i don't think so with such low pressure atmosphere...they'd be low density tyres or you'd make them from metal like an the real rovers on mars now.

they may have rubber tread parts for better purchase on the loose soil, sands of mars.

shrox
05-05-2013, 02:54 PM
http://web.archive.org/web/20020623153749/http://www.shrox.com/OverView1.JPG

i like this one!

one of the unrealistic things in my shots is the rubber tyres as such things will be too heavy to transport there for the rocket cost unless you grow your own rubber trees in bio domes and tap the rubber...as for having inflatable tyres...no i don't think so with such low pressure atmosphere...they'd be low density tyres or you'd make them from metal like an the real rovers on mars now.

they may have rubber tread parts for better purchase on the loose soil, sands of mars.

The plans are/were for inflatable structures on Mars. Tires would probably be like the rovers on Mars now, springy metal with some rubber strips for added for better traction over smoother rocks.

Most of these are concept art for SimMars from when I was executive artist at Maxis. It never came out though, when EA bought Maxis, they killed it in favor of Spore. I think SimMars and The Sims would have been the twin killer apps...NASA was totally behind SimMars too. They invited us to Ames several times. I learned that satellites don't use super fast processors, the circuits in modern PC processors are small enough to be affected by cosmic radiation. They can be used on board human rated craft though.

inkpen3d
05-06-2013, 06:44 AM
Not that I'm against human exploration and colonisation of space, but if we have any sense we should not contemplate sending anyone to Mars until we have reasonable evidence that there is no currently active biology (e.g. in the form of bacteria, or their equivalent) native to the planet. If there is some form of native Martian life - say bacterial analogues living in a sub-surface environment - and we send human explorers or colonists (who, lets face it, are crawling with bacteria, fungi, viruses, eye-lash mites and so on) we will contaminate the (virtually) pristine environment of Mars with organisms from earth and lose the unique chance to study exobiology that has arisen independently on a planet other than earth.

The loss of this never-to-be-repeated opportunity to science would be immense. To prematurely send humans or any other biological material to Mars would be an almost criminal act of negligence and an example of human-kind placing individual and/or collective prestige seeking above that of preserving and studying any possible native Martian biology.

Regards,
Peter

prometheus
05-06-2013, 07:31 AM
Not that I'm against human exploration and colonisation of space, but if we have any sense we should not contemplate sending anyone to Mars until we have reasonable evidence that there is no currently active biology (e.g. in the form of bacteria, or their equivalent) native to the planet. If there is some form of native Martian life - say bacterial analogues living in a sub-surface environment - and we send human explorers or colonists (who, lets face it, are crawling with bacteria, fungi, viruses, eye-lash mites and so on) we will contaminate the (virtually) pristine environment of Mars with organisms from earth and lose the unique chance to study exobiology that has arisen independently on a planet other than earth.

The loss of this never-to-be-repeated opportunity to science would be immense. To prematurely send humans or any other biological material to Mars would be an almost criminal act of negligence and an example of human-kind placing individual and/or collective prestige seeking above that of preserving and studying any possible native Martian biology.

Regards,
Peter

Valid points...and enough to start itīs own thread perhaps about if/why and when we should go there.
But Im not sure if there is a difference between the sterilized vehicles we already have sent compared to the routine that will occour when we send humans up, I could
imagine the sterilizing process will be the same for space suits and those vehicles.
Then we could argue when the time is right..I think we could go on and send probes for ages without getting any positive results..and to be fully secure such process would take a lot of years.

If the process for sterile equipment are the same as for the probes we already have sent, or better..then I see no issues with the journey to Mars. (except economical & social arguments referencing earth problems)

Michael

short223
05-06-2013, 08:30 AM
Not necessarily colonization but more news reporting illustrations...

114143

114144

inkpen3d
05-06-2013, 09:02 AM
Valid points...and enough to start itīs own thread perhaps about if/why and when we should go there.
But Im not sure if there is a difference between the sterilized vehicles we already have sent compared to the routine that will occour when we send humans up, I could
imagine the sterilizing process will be the same for space suits and those vehicles.
Then we could argue when the time is right..I think we could go on and send probes for ages without getting any positive results..and to be fully secure such process would take a lot of years.

If the process for sterile equipment are the same as for the probes we already have sent, or better..then I see no issues with the journey to Mars. (except economical & social arguments referencing earth problems)

Michael

I agree that we will never be 100% certain that there's no life on Mars - it's a big place with many interesting nooks and crannies (e.g. sub-surface lava tubes) that could harbour native life. However, the best bet is finding life in a sub-surface layers down where the permafrost water has melted due to heat percolating up from the planet's interior - simple life could have survived there for billions of years. The problem is that we have, both literally and metaphorically, just scratched the surface of Mars and there still remains a lot of relatively easy work to be done by robotic explorers such as drilling down into the permafrost and returning samples to earth for laboratory analysis.

I would love to see humans on Mars in my lifetime - the idea really excites me. But as a scientist, I would also hate for us to rush in there like a bunch of over excited children and possibly ruining our one and only chance of investigating our first encounter with exobiology when we don't even know if it exists there or not - future generations would never forgive us for our ineptitude born out of our haste to get to Mars.

Regarding sterilisation...

The main problem with humans is that you can't sterilise them (cue crude jokes ;))! Our very health depends on a complex ecosystem of symbiotic skin and gut bacteria. It is the gut bacteria in particular that we cannot live without - we would be unable to digest food and absorb important nutrients without these bacteria and they also have a huge indirect influence on the biochemistry of the body. BTW, over 50% by weight of your faecal matter is made up of gut bacteria that have been living and multiplying in your large intestine! No sterilisation procedure can guarantee the prevention of the eventual release of micro-organisms into the Martian environment. People are lazy and/or make mistakes - just touching the outside of a EVA suite with bare fingers will transfer millions of bacteria and viruses to its surface, which will then escape next time that suite is used outside.

Then there's all the living quarters, hydroponic gardens (or whatever) and waste recycling plants that would be required by even a small colony:

Over any long period of time you'll almost inevitably get an accidental breach of these enclosures leading to a significant release of biological material. And then, in the very long term, what happens to all these habitats and gear if the colonists decide to pack up and head back to earth? Or, if it's one of these proposed "one-way" colonisation projects, what happens when the colony eventually fails? After all, the surface of Mars is an horrendously extreme environment and any colony, however large, will be in a metastable state with respect to this environment and so is almost guaranteed to suffer eventual failure. There is no way there's going to be a huge clean-up operation mounted to return the colonisation site(s) to an original pristine state - the sites will simply be abandoned and left to decay over time. We humans always have been, and will continue to be, a messy lot - otherwise, archaeology would not exist!

The chance of finding and investigating exobiology on our doorstep is far too important a prize to casually sacrifice to those people who want to rush getting humans to Mars to satisfy their own egos.

Regards,
Peter

shrox
05-06-2013, 10:59 AM
It's too late, contamination has already happened it is believed. More than one recovered space probe (two from Apollo landing missions picking up samples from a previous unmanned mission, and the X-37 all still had bacteria that survived in open space. In samples recovered from the Apollo mission still had the bacteria of the equipment assemblers This after being on the moon for five years, then another 30 in cold storage before finally opened.

Bacteria has also survived exposure outside the International Space Station. Yet open space may be "friendlier" to Earth bacteria that the Maritain surface. Just a little extra moisture can cover the bacteria, freeze and then literally shatter the bacteria, so it may be self sterilizing in a way.

inkpen3d
05-06-2013, 02:16 PM
It's too late, contamination has already happened it is believed. More than one recovered space probe (two from Apollo landing missions picking up samples from a previous unmanned mission, and the X-37 all still had bacteria that survived in open space. In samples recovered from the Apollo mission still had the bacteria of the equipment assemblers This after being on the moon for five years, then another 30 in cold storage before finally opened.

Bacteria has also survived exposure outside the International Space Station. Yet open space may be "friendlier" to Earth bacteria that the Maritain surface. Just a little extra moisture can cover the bacteria, freeze and then literally shatter the bacteria, so it may be self sterilizing in a way.

Fortunately, all planetary probes are constructed in clean room conditions and then undergo sterilisation prior to launch. The chances of any significant biological contamination making it to Mars on these probes is small.

Regards,
Peter

shrox
05-06-2013, 02:42 PM
Fortunately, all planetary probes are constructed in clean room conditions and then undergo sterilisation prior to launch. The chances of any significant biological contamination making it to Mars on these probes is small.

Regards,
Peter

Ummm....I just cited three cases of contamination. Of course every attempt is made to completely sterilize any item, but stuff makes it through.

inkpen3d
05-06-2013, 02:59 PM
Ummm....I just cited three cases of contamination. Of course every attempt is made to completely sterilize any item, but stuff makes it through.

Yes, but back in the Apollo era, they weren't' that careful about decontamination as they were just interested in getting to the moon at any cost. However, I seem to remember that for the Viking missions and onwards they took more care about preventing biocontamination.

Regards,
Peter

shrox
05-06-2013, 03:00 PM
The X-37 is recent, the contamination is miniscule though. The 2007 Stardust mission had chemical contamination as well.

http://www.newscientist.com/blog/space/2007/04/was-stardust-mission-contaminated.html

shrox
05-06-2013, 03:07 PM
Quick! Somebody whip up a picture of Jeff Goldblum and a Martian dinosaur with the caption "Life...uhh...finds a way."

inkpen3d
05-07-2013, 01:40 AM
The X-37 is recent, the contamination is miniscule though. The 2007 Stardust mission had chemical contamination as well.

http://www.newscientist.com/blog/space/2007/04/was-stardust-mission-contaminated.html

Hmm, I can see the point you are trying to make, but both spacecraft you refer to are not planetary probes and so would not necessarily undergo the rigorous sterilisation procedures as craft being deliberately sent to planets. And chemical contamination does not present the same threat as biological contamination.

However, I concede the point that no craft can be 100% sterile so it is possible that some very, very, low-level contamination of Mars may have already occurred. But this would pale into insignificance if we sent humans to Mars!

Regards,
Peter

Bill Carey
05-07-2013, 12:30 PM
Dutch company Mars one, dailymail article...
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2312857/Applications-open-way-trip-Mars-Mission-calls-couple-willing-cooped-501-day-trip.html

the test station in moscow...
http://www.google.se/imgres?safe=off&hl=sv&biw=1600&bih=736&tbm=isch&tbnid=8wAc2bHwN4tooM:&imgrefurl=http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20927984.600-first-humans-set-to-land-on-mars-sort-of.html&docid=6qJ-OSgGlWQo-M&imgurl=http://www.newscientist.com/data/images/archive/2798/27984601.jpg&w=823&h=539&ei=ajWFUd3nDuK54ASC3YGQCQ&zoom=1&ved=1t:3588,r:99,s:0,i:387&iact=rc&dur=1268&page=5&tbnh=180&tbnw=278&start=95&ndsp=25&tx=133&ty=30

The timeline schedule for a mars trip according to Mars one seems a bit too optimistic, just a few years ahead.

This looks similar to Mars Direct without bothering to come back.

http://www.marssociety.org/home/about/mars-direct

There was a set of models you could get for Bryce many moons ago.

prometheus
05-07-2013, 04:30 PM
I donīt worry about contamination that much really, I suppose they should take some precausions and do their very best to try not to contaminate areas, and that would include building a sterilizing module for external
mars exhibit space suits etc.

I donīt excpect we will see any life of significant magnitude at all on mars if any really, and If we come across it..then Im sure we will now and make appropiate steps to investigate it wether it be bacteria
or microbs...donīt expect kermit the frog in the neighbourhood.

Whatīs more important than finding mars life or the "glory of getting man on mars" I think that is the bigger picture to actually send humans on to other planets to learn surviving on jump points..and
that one day..( 500-1000) years perhaps...might have reached a point where it might be possible to (not reach) but to start a journey to distant stars which by that time might have been discovered
and explored as habitable.
Might sound like a dream or unrealistic...but that remains to be seen aint it, it would require knowledge and a certainty of such an inabitable solarsystem not to far away by technological advances not available today.

And furthermore ..It will be such an endeavour that would require generations after generations living in space solely, until several generations down the road reaches itīs destiny...maybe a journey taking several hundreds of years.

Ohh..sorry, we need to get to mars first:)
Im pretty sure thereīs life out there anyway, in some form...but that would come second to what humanityīs prioritys need to be at the very end of our earth resources.

shrox
05-07-2013, 04:44 PM
Here is a list of probe missions to Mars:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/programmissions/missions/log/

prometheus
05-07-2013, 05:53 PM
Here is a list of probe missions to Mars:

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/programmissions/missions/log/

Well ..six consecutive success missions from the U.S... Itīs getting better, how depressing It was in the beginning though.
Hopefully they can keep sending a couple of more probes with sucess and following that up with modules and acessories for the arriving colonists.

Edit...should be seven success missions, aint the last mission with curiosity2012missing?

dickbill
05-09-2013, 12:08 PM
Nice movie Shrox. As other said, Mars atmosphere is too thin to allow a 'dyna-soar' style lifting body with such small area to glide back to the ground. Although the first part, the initial aerobraking in the upper atmosphere would be fine to enter into the Mars atmosphere, some extra aera would be needed to provide the extra lift needed for a high speed glide and landing.I imagined some sort of deployable second or triple wings or glide-parachute or the use of porous wings.
Also, Mars atmosphere is very thin, but due to the low gravity it is very 'tall'. That makes it ideal, easy and safe, for aero-braking or aero-capture of the mother ship into Mars orbit. As opposed to Earth whose atmosphere is more compressed and would force to aerobrake tighter, which makes the calculations more critical and any error in angle or speed more lethal. If we add the junk in low earth orbit, i am pretty sure that earth atmosphere will never be used for aerobraking or aerocapture to insert a returning spaceship into low earth orbit.
Aerobraking uses the atmosphere to assist the orbital insertion (i think Mars probe Reconnaissance Orbiter aerobraked repetitively for almost 3 months before it reached its final orbit) as there is still a need for boosters, while during aerocapture, the braking is pushed almost all the way down to the orbital speed (like in 2010 Space Odyssea) with only some minimum rocketry to circularize the orbit. I am not sure aerocapture is safe enough for a manned mission, certainly not on Jupiter at least. But aerobraking can save a huge amount of propellant and time, to insert the mother ship into mars orbit. Since we are talking about a nuclear mothership, It requires a structurally strong build, as compact as possible to take the gs and manoeuver quickly if necessary with a big frontal shield.

I had a gallery at renderosity about that, latest pic was:
http://www.renderosity.com/mod/gallery/index.php?image_id=1578520&user_id=78233&np&np
or like this:
114212

dickbill
05-09-2013, 12:21 PM
114215

shrox
05-09-2013, 12:36 PM
Nice movie Shrox. As other said, Mars atmosphere is too thin to allow a 'dyna-soar' style lifting body with such small area to glide back to the ground. Although the first part, the initial aerobraking in the upper atmosphere would be fine to enter into the Mars atmosphere, some extra aera would be needed to provide the extra lift needed for a high speed glide and landing.I imagined some sort of deployable second or triple wings or glide-parachute or the use of porous wings.
Also, Mars atmosphere is very thin, but due to the low gravity it is very 'tall'. That makes it ideal, easy and safe, for aero-braking or aero-capture of the mother ship into Mars orbit. As opposed to Earth whose atmosphere is more compressed and would force to aerobrake tighter, which makes the calculations more critical and any error in angle or speed more lethal. If we add the junk in low earth orbit, i am pretty sure that earth atmosphere will never be used for aerobraking or aerocapture to insert a returning spaceship into low earth orbit.
Aerobraking uses the atmosphere to assist the orbital insertion (i think Mars probe Reconnaissance Orbiter aerobraked repetitively for almost 3 months before it reached its final orbit) as there is still a need for boosters, while during aerocapture, the braking is pushed almost all the way down to the orbital speed (like in 2010 Space Odyssea) with only some minimum rocketry to circularize the orbit. I am not sure aerocapture is safe enough for a manned mission, certainly not on Jupiter at least. But aerobraking can save a huge amount of propellant and time, to insert the mother ship into mars orbit. Since we are talking about a nuclear mothership, It requires a structurally strong build, as compact as possible to take the gs and manoeuver quickly if necessary with a big frontal shield.

I had a gallery at renderosity about that, latest pic was:
http://www.renderosity.com/mod/gallery/index.php?image_id=1578520&user_id=78233&np&np
or like this:
114212

Artist license...it's gotta be cool too...

shrox
07-14-2014, 09:45 PM
The twin spacecraft Stradivarius and Guarneri arrive at Mars.

123042

Inflatable greenhouse on Mars.

123043

Marander
07-15-2014, 01:27 AM
Very nice art work Shrox! I'm currently doing a hobby animation including some terraforming facility but when I see your picture I just want to start all over again... Cheers

prometheus
07-15-2014, 09:20 AM
Those are some nice images shrox, I especially like the one with the stradivarius, I like the the painted feel of it, resembles a little of old 2001 paintings.

shrox
07-18-2014, 08:32 PM
Thanks all! By the way, I have launched my Kicksatrter project for the Mars art calendar.

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/515267715/mars-awaits-2015-calendar