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View Full Version : Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) / Hands or grip shot



Joey_C
01-27-2013, 11:51 AM
Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) debilitating condition resulting from overusing
the hands to perform a repetitive task, such as in my case clicking and draging a mouse.

Anyone out there suffered with this and learned treatment that helped at your workstation?
I can't hold a pen, I stand, sit on a ball at work ... my hands are shot.

Anyone have experienced and how they dealt with this?



THANKS

nickdigital
01-27-2013, 01:38 PM
Changing up how you work will help. I primarily use a wacom but keep a mouse plugged in so I can vary up my routine. Using a stylus means you work more from the shoulder versus from the wrist which is how using a mouse is. If you can't use a stylus you could try using an ergonomicmouse , the one that looks like a joystick. That style of mouse forces you to work from your shoulder and also puts your hand/wrist in a more natural position. I used to have a cramping problem in my hand and changing things up helped.

OnlineRender
01-27-2013, 01:43 PM
not as much as repetitive strain however I notice my eyes getting worse with every render...

khan973
01-27-2013, 02:08 PM
Try to make a pause every hour, stretch a litte bit.
Get a gel mousepad.
Don't work too much, kill yourself for clients or a boss won't serve you in long term

bazsa73
01-27-2013, 02:11 PM
Good chair with a wide supportive armrest is a must imho. Also worth the price investing into a metallic bar you can get in sport equipment shops
which you can fix between door frames. Hang on that like a monkey. It strengthens and flexes your muscles at the same time. Works for me.

50one
01-27-2013, 02:32 PM
I'm a sufferer to SRI, got problems with my back, shoulders and neck all due to the years of wrong posture, wrists are cracking like mad too, sad but true, stretching won't help, only a therapy and avoidance of thing that caused the injury in first place. I simply haven't touched PC at home for the past three months(just at work). I consider myself quite fit, spend years hiking(i'm an outdoor man). SRI can really fu** you up, no jokes, if you're just noticing first symptoms of numbness, cramps and all that, go see a specialist.

stargatesg1
01-28-2013, 07:43 PM
I find a wacom tablet works well. I have avoided a mouse for almost 8 years now.. No issues! Also for 3d I have added a http://www.3dconnexion.com space pilot pro. LOVE IT!



I'm a sufferer to SRI, got problems with my back, shoulders and neck all due to the years of wrong posture, wrists are cracking like mad too, sad but true, stretching won't help, only a therapy and avoidance of thing that caused the injury in first place. I simply haven't touched PC at home for the past three months(just at work). I consider myself quite fit, spend years hiking(i'm an outdoor man). SRI can really fu** you up, no jokes, if you're just noticing first symptoms of numbness, cramps and all that, go see a specialist.

Ryan Roye
01-28-2013, 07:54 PM
Agreed with the above said... but what if breaks aren't enough?

I know it isn't for everyone, but I use Autohotkey (http://www.autohotkey.com/) (a free program) to avoid a lot of repetitive stress injury... it is one of the primary reasons I use it actually. If there is any repetitive task in my workflow at all... such as navigating to production folders (in all programs), manipulating a setting in a window that could otherwise be controlled via a keypress, bulk-renaming, making access to menus require less user actions, etc, I create scripts to save my hands the effort. It really helps and can also save you a bunch of time and make you more productive to boot. The script language is very user friendly and is extremely well-documented and easy to learn. In fact you can almost literally copy-paste the examples the documentation provides and just fill in the blanks to be left with a usable script.

The mouse is probably the worst enemy concerning ergonomics, so the more tasks you can manage to do without having to use the mouse, the better off your wrists will be.

That's just my 2

jameswillmott
01-28-2013, 08:37 PM
It's debilitating, I hated my RSI.

Using a pen works a lot, but the thing that really helped me was exercises at the gym where I had to hold something with a very tight grip, like a Seated Low Row, Chin-ups ( assisted or free ) , Horizontal Row, or anything involving *pulling* the weights during the exercise. It took about two weeks to fix it, but if I skip the exercises for a few days it comes back.

jeric_synergy
01-28-2013, 08:44 PM
Check your station: once I got a HORRIBLE forearm pain, thought that was it, then realized all the crap on my desk was preventing me from resting my elbow on the desk. 2 days later, fine.

Have someone ELSE watch you while you work to spot issues.

Consult with a genuine professional occupational consultant. (Professionals, they know a thing or two.)

There's a lady at my coffee shop whose JOB is to clear insurance claims: she uses this bizarre mouse that's like a hockey puck with a perfectly vertical handle. Prevents user from having to rotate forearm. At least it's going to be DIFFERENT, and that's the key in RSI, no?

Good luck, really.

sadkkf
01-30-2013, 11:23 AM
I developed this in my right hand and learned to use my left for mousing. Pretty much solved the problem, though I take some ibuprofen now and then.

jeric_synergy
01-30-2013, 11:30 AM
Learn as many hotkeys as possible to break up the Evul rhythm. If you're clicking on menus, you are doing it wrong.

Consider getting a Logitech G13 or equivalent-- anything to remove some labor from the mouse hand.

UnCommonGrafx
01-30-2013, 12:41 PM
Exercise.
It is the ONLY thing that will alleviate this ailment.
And it has to be continued after feeling better.

The problem is in how sedentary we become, both with our exercise and our basis of repetition, i.e., do we do a variety of things or a few singular endeavors throughout the day. (Sinular endeavors - get up, go to work, come home, have a beer and a meal then to bed. Repeat ad nauseum.)

snsmoore
01-30-2013, 02:17 PM
Changing up how you work will help. I primarily use a wacom but keep a mouse plugged in so I can vary up my routine. Using a stylus means you work more from the shoulder versus from the wrist which is how using a mouse is. If you can't use a stylus you could try using an ergonomicmouse , the one that looks like a joystick. That style of mouse forces you to work from your shoulder and also puts your hand/wrist in a more natural position. I used to have a cramping problem in my hand and changing things up helped.

I've had really good results with the joystick style mice, as I used to get cramping in my fingers. (3m Ergonomic mouse is what I use.) I also have switched to a Dvorak layout which has saved my fingers. (a lot less reaching per finger....but I had to learn how to type again....ugh!)