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View Full Version : Lightwave v9.6 - most reliable version of Quicktime to use for animation export?



lightwavejones
01-12-2013, 05:37 AM
Hi All,

I keep crashing Layout in Lightwave 9.6(Windows XPpro 32bit )when I try to render out a Quicktime animation - does anyone happen to know the
most reliable version of Quicktime to use with v9.6 (and also if it needs to be the Quicktime Pro version instead of the normal free download player version)

PS. I'm currently using Quicktime 6.5.2 and it seems to play .mov files Ok on my system it's just the render problem that's giving trouble.

Any help here would be most appreciated.

Regards

Anthony Jones

RebelHill
01-12-2013, 05:44 AM
Not sure... but for best reliability you shoudnt render to a movie format anyway, but instead always render to frames, and combine them after the fact to a final movie file.

Ryan Roye
01-12-2013, 09:42 AM
Not sure... but for best reliability you shoudnt render to a movie format anyway, but instead always render to frames, and combine them after the fact to a final movie file.

This... and to elaborate...

To turn an image sequences into video straight through Lightwave.

-Click Image Editor

-Click "Load", and pick the first image in your sequence

-In this same screen, where it says "type", set it to "Sequence"

-Now via Windows >> Compositing Options (or ctrl+f7), set "Background Image" to the image sequence you inserted in earlier steps.

-Be sure the camera in your scene (in the 3d area) is set to "Match Global"; hitting "p" to bring up its properties

-Be sure that the Render Global options match that of your original image. If you have 1280x720 images and your render globals are set to 640x480, the image sequence will get resized. Also, set "First" and "Last" to the number of frames your animation is.

-In the output tab of render globals, do "save animation".

-Hit Render scene, and you'll have your video file. Since you're only dealing with an image sequence, "rendering" it into a movie doesn't take long.


That's how you do it straight through Lightwave... it is not efficient doing it this way, but it gets you by if you don't have anything else. I actually recommend that you either use a video editor that can handle image sequences, or use a free tool like VirtualDub (http://www.virtualdub.org/) to for your image sequence editing needs. Virtualdub is especially handy for previewing your image sequences in motion before compiling the video (just drag-n-drop the first image file).