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View Full Version : Staples Announces In-Store 3-D Printing Service



robertoortiz
11-29-2012, 04:02 PM
Quote:
"
Pretty soon you’ll be able to print your 3-D projects at the local Staples.

A new service called “Staples Easy 3D” will allow customers to upload their designs to Staples’ website, then pick up the printed objects at their local office supply megastore, or have them shipped to their home or business — not unlike the photo- and document-printing service the company already offers.

The project was announced today at Euromold 2012 by 3-D printer manufacturer Mcor Technologies, who is partnering with Staples to provide its new Iris printers for the service.

The Iris printers employ an innovative method to generate objects, using reams of paper that are cut and printed while being stacked and glued together. This technique allows for a high-resolution layer thickness of 100 microns, similar to that of the MakerBot Replicator 2, but not quite as fine as the 25-micron capability of the Form 1.


The new printers also incorporate the ability to add photorealistic coloring — something that more common plastic printers can’t yet achieve. But while the glued paper is said to have a wood-like hardness, the arrangement of the layered paper grain will require special consideration for certain design layouts (this can affect other types of 3-D printers as well). And while the company says it is able to be drilled, tapped or screwed, its material properties are unknown compared to traditional materials like real wood or steel.
Still, the move by an established corporation to offer 3-D printing further legitimizes the adoption of the rapidly growing field by the mass market. Similar services currently exist, being offered by companies like Shapeways and Sculpteo, but this is the first to be made available from a chain retailer.

Staples Easy 3D will launch in the Netherlands and Belgium in the first quarter of 2013, and will be rolled out to other countries shortly afterword. No word yet on pricing or when it will reach the United States."

http://www.wired.com/design/2012/11/staples-goes-3-d/

erikals
11-29-2012, 04:15 PM
hm, interesting indeed, the printer they use is damn expensive (even though the paper is, of course, not...)

so i wonder what the final price will be.
pretty cool that it supports color though... (and big prints...)

safetyman
11-30-2012, 12:15 PM
Rats -- Roberto beat me to it. Not available in the States yet. :(

Philbert
12-01-2012, 12:42 AM
I saw this posted earlier on Google+. I question the use of these paper printers. I saw them at Siggraph (on video) but mostly know little about how well they work and the quality of the model. For example, it sounds dumb but, what happens if the model gets wet? I've also seen how they have to break apart the block of paper after the printing is done and feel like this fragile parts may not stay together. Like for a example a character model who's holding a sword. Or a character with long flowing hair.

geo_n
12-01-2012, 02:23 AM
I saw this posted earlier on Google+. I question the use of these paper printers. I saw them at Siggraph (on video) but mostly know little about how well they work and the quality of the model. For example, it sounds dumb but, what happens if the model gets wet? I've also seen how they have to break apart the block of paper after the printing is done and feel like this fragile parts may not stay together. Like for a example a character model who's holding a sword. Or a character with long flowing hair.

The prints are sealed with superglue. I have a dozen characters printed that I created from lightwave.

BigHache
12-01-2012, 03:28 AM
The prints are sealed with superglue. I have a dozen characters printed that I created from lightwave.

Do you have any pics? Ppppppplease? What do you think of the prints?

robertoortiz
12-01-2012, 11:32 AM
Well to be fair the advantage of this material is the fact that you can get rid of it.
If you want something more permanent you should look into printing with shapeways.

Philbert
12-01-2012, 07:28 PM
The prints are sealed with superglue. I have a dozen characters printed that I created from lightwave.

Where did you get prints made with these printers? I didn't even know they were for sale yet.


Well to be fair the advantage of this material is the fact that you can get rid of it.
If you want something more permanent you should look into printing with shapeways.

What do you mean "get rid of it"?

geo_n
12-02-2012, 08:28 PM
Test prototype. Tiny size. Can't really say much due to nda.
Farewell the dongle.

erikals
12-03-2012, 04:39 AM
looks great geo! \:]

cagey5
12-03-2012, 07:06 AM
Those are some of the best 3d prints I've seen.

BigHache
12-03-2012, 10:03 AM
Nice! If you can answer without breaking NDA, were these printed inhouse or sent out to a printing service?