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codyburke610
09-10-2012, 06:40 PM
Hello all,

I'm going to be making a list of possible tutorials to record for the LightWave YouTube Channel. I want to target individuals at a younger age to get them excited about being able to create something from nothing. Also, allow them to be able to walk through the tutorial seamlessly from start to finish even if they have no prior experience with LightWave or 3D in general.

So, what I'm asking from the community, is to think back when you first started using LightWave. What are some tutorials you wish you could find? Whether it's how to model a certain object, or surface something, or how to use a specific tool, etc.

These will be rather quick tutorials geared towards novice users, but feel free to throw in any suggestions.

Thanks
-Cody-

nickdigital
09-12-2012, 12:08 AM
How about a basic tutorial where you model a basic character? Not photo real but more cartoonh. Think Wallace and Gromit style to show off basic box modeling techniques. With genoma you can then rig it quickly.

This would show newbies how quick you can get to animation.

nickdigital
09-12-2012, 12:17 AM
There's the basic rocket ship tutorial. It'll cover basic modeling techniques, fx for the flame and particles. It will be a good entry to spaceship work which LW excels at.

alexs3d
09-12-2012, 12:44 AM
when i started 3d my first 3dmodels where cars and human faces, i downloaded all tutorials i could find about making an ear, an eyeball, a head :) ....all saved on floppy disks :) phu .. a long time ago ;) no video ...

but there are a lot of head modeling tutorilas out there, so i think they are not needed.

i personally would like to see a NATURE project/workshop. building a landscape in lightwave, with modeling trees, plants, rocks, stones, houses, with features like instancing, flocking birds over the landscape etc. ...

alexs

Dexter2999
09-12-2012, 01:10 AM
I second a box model cartoony figure and rig with Genoma.
I think a video with common mistakes would be a good idea. Things like "I lost my toolbar", "I added a second object now I can't see my first object in Layout", Autokey, nonplaner/double poly/points, accidentally unchecking items in the Scene Editor, etc... you get the idea.

zardoz
09-12-2012, 04:13 AM
I think you could have practical examples of the several uses a certain tool might have. Things like "the Bevel tool bevels" are not very good. Model a bottle with bevel, or a window or an ashtray.
Also, show how to model the same object with different tools, like modelling a bottle with bevel, then using a curve with lathe, or a series of concentric circles with different weight values and use weight as a falloff for the move tool...I know that no one does this, I don't. But I guess it's a nice way to show the falloffs in some of the tools. I know that I started using some of the falloffs very late, so it would be nice for new users to be aware of it sooner.

by the way are you guys thinking of a new bend tool? the one we have is not very good...we need some kind of snap for tools like bend.

107810107811

PS: comments on the shape of that bottle are not necessary, ok? ;)

Burchigb
09-12-2012, 06:09 PM
Cloth sim using a real models
weight maps (done correctly) And why it is important.
bones (not the worm one) something more simple like humans
UV using english that makes sense and real examples.
What does the (in modeler) W, T, M, C, S used for and show it being used.
Heavily used short cuts in modeler and layout
One of the most important things to know:
Darn it my config file is hosed how to I revert to default like when I first installed the program.
I got more...

geo_n
09-14-2012, 03:28 AM
How about making videos for the content files in lw. Some of them are project based with concepts that can be adapted to different projects. Lw 8 has a lot of content that is still relevant and usefull. Updating them and making video tuts alongside will be useful like protons tuts.

Ryan Roye
09-14-2012, 06:54 AM
Simple tool demos come to mind...

Example: You can use the spikey tool to create anime style hair, or perhaps simple geometric animal fur very easily... I use it extensively myself.

You can control the "spikes" in various ways:

Selecting points, then reducing selection lets you control the points directly... from here you can...
-Use move to lengthen/shorten/position the hair
-Using the stretch tool can narrow or fan out the spikes
-Use the scale tool to widen/narrow uniformly
-Use the mirror tool for additional control over your commands
-Rotate to slant the hair as desired
-Jitter to give variation
-Use the drag-net tool to "sculpt" the hair if needed
-Finally, saving the selection makes future editing a breeze.

I love the spikey tool... I usually do hair with alpha images now, but I still mix in spikey-tooled geometry to give the hair a sense of volume.

nickdigital
09-15-2012, 02:38 PM
Show how you can create a complex rig (spaceship with multiple parts, transforming robot, etc) that's controlled with cyclist.

OnlineRender
09-15-2012, 04:56 PM
why not start with an ABC introduction .... rather than focus on a certain aspects show a complete newbie how to model render animate. aka a beginners guide

zardoz
09-15-2012, 05:56 PM
a few more tips in here
http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?129602

Oedo 808
09-22-2012, 08:30 AM
I'm not sure what's up in this line already, but for the very beginner you could have the UV mapping of a basic soda can. If you could link it with being loaded as a prop into something like Unity I think it would be a good link up.

wesleycorgi
09-22-2012, 09:25 AM
I like Nick's idea of modeling (then rigging later) a character. My kids are fascinated when I am working in LW. They'll ask me a thousand questions of what I'm doing.

Dexter2999
09-22-2012, 10:19 AM
How to render to a sequence and assemble it into an anim. (and WHY)
And to play devil's advocate, how to render to QT and why it doesn't work on 64bit. And how to repair a failed QT render.

geo_n
09-22-2012, 10:32 AM
Node tutorials - beginner to advance level in real world applications like RH node tutorials but less advance. Nodes are the most unknown aspect of lw.

New features of lw 11 a practical guide in real world applications. Showcase what lw 11 has in real world applications that would entice people to upgrade.

BigHache
09-22-2012, 10:46 AM
Nodes are the most unknown aspect of lw.

That and Python.

geo_n
10-30-2012, 09:24 PM
I saw some modelling demos lately. Nice work.
How about some advance stuff? Real world applications.
Relativity is not so known but its powerful. The wire is real time in this video with relativity.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-akoCncr1M&feature=youtu.be

djwaterman
10-30-2012, 09:44 PM
I second or third the suggestion of a cartoony character build, then the rigging and weighting followed by some simple animation. You'd also want to include morph mixing with some simple face expressions. I'm thinking of newbies and why they want to get into 3D animation, that is to animate. Such a sequence of short yet simple videos could also cover texturing the character plus lighting and all the way through to rendering out an image sequence. You could even cover Fiber Effects, cloth dynamics or just about any aspect of LW if you followed along with this single character. The character should be very simple yet capable of illustrating all the primary topics.

It's a series Cody.

djwaterman
10-30-2012, 09:48 PM
stupid up and down forum double post

Davewriter
10-31-2012, 04:49 PM
Rendering...
As simple as "suggestions" on setup. As example - one charactor in a room - one charactor by his front door...
And to make the "suggestions" relevant by version of LW you have.
If you go to the pull down - WOW what a list of settings! Pick the wrong one and it takes days to render. Use the same settings in LW 8 as you try in LW 11 and now it looks completely different.
Some suggestions or "defaults" would sure help those of us who are not in the Pro Leauges

Oh - and THANKS!
Nice of you to ask and looking forward to all the info that does come out

jameswillmott
11-01-2012, 06:56 PM
i personally would like to see a NATURE project/workshop. building a landscape in lightwave, with modeling trees, plants, rocks, stones, houses, with features like instancing, flocking birds over the landscape etc. ...


A good suggestion, we're looking at making a few sample flocking scenes for future releases, but a full nature tutorial would be great.

goakes
11-01-2012, 07:17 PM
+1 for me Dave and James.

alexs3d
11-02-2012, 02:44 AM
A good suggestion, we're looking at making a few sample flocking scenes for future releases, but a full nature tutorial would be great.

jup, a nature tutorial would be awesome :) but a more advanced one, not only grass -> instancing -> ready :)

MarcusM
11-02-2012, 04:17 AM
My first idea about new users is - On Lightwave website in download section should be pdf for print with shortcuts for Modeler and Layout.
Could be also compare shortcuts from Maya, Max and Blender wit Lightwave to make transition easier. When it's ready, put info on Facebook :) It is so simple and so necessary!

New user can have problem to set up render settings. There should be something for them. In New LW could be few ready render quality settings to choose.
Tutorials with lighting, manage assets in scene (parenting, moving, pivot moving), baking textures for game objects... there is so many things :]

lardbros
11-02-2012, 06:11 AM
I saw some modelling demos lately. Nice work.
How about some advance stuff? Real world applications.
Relativity is not so known but its powerful. The wire is real time in this video with relativity.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-akoCncr1M&feature=youtu.be

Completely agree... this is one area there is hardly any info on. That pixar lamp example is really nice, but wouldn't have a clue how to obtain that at all. In real-time too... would love that!!

stevenpalomino
11-02-2012, 09:22 AM
Honestly, when deciding on LightWave I remember a huge thing for me was that I saw the siggraph videos from years ago where Jarrod Davis was showing how he used LW on TV to solve problems (animating cloth with procedural texture, etc.) I think basic tutorials would be awesome but I haven't seen many tutorials on full scale projects.

I vote for the cartoon idea.

And maybe you can do a modling to rigging to animation.
last one I saw on this was the Desktop Images tutorial by Todd Grimes (Frikkin awesome). It was like 12+ hours or something from blank canvas to animation of character moving around / talking to audio. Was the best tutorial I ever saw hands down.

ksnoad
11-02-2012, 11:23 AM
How about using GuerrillaCG approach but from a LW point of view...

http://www.youtube.com/user/GuerrillaCG

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bZ7gstIWyI&list=PL6A7DF3D7866EB076&feature=plcp


Kev xx

UnCommonGrafx
11-02-2012, 02:13 PM
Relativity or the Nodal equivalent.

CAPTIONING!!

I'm a teacher at a deaf school and text is their only access to the info being spoken. I send them to sites for tutes but it becomes painfully awkward when the person on the vid starts explaining things without any action on the screen.

As an aside, for anyone not understanding your spoken English, written text might be accessible for them much more readily.

Thanks for asking.

RebelHill
11-02-2012, 02:24 PM
CAPTIONING!!

I'm a teacher at a deaf school and text is their only access to the info being spoken...

Yeah... I gotta say Ive seen you say that before, and I have taken note, but have had a hard time thinking up a good way to get it done properly and keep time, without taking almost as long as the vids themselves all over again. I also thought it'd be a good way for those of different languages to get access, as itd be possible to pump whole subs files through google translate and at least the greater part of the tut content. Imperfect I know, but potentially good enough to be worthwhile. Ofc YT now seems to be doing auto captioning... again imperfect, but perhaps close enough.

But I spose youre the guy to ask reli... whats your advice for getting caps produced, accessible, ignorable for those who hear just fine?

Ryan Roye
11-02-2012, 02:40 PM
But I spose youre the guy to ask reli... whats your advice for getting caps produced, accessible, ignorable for those who hear just fine?

.srt files embedded into video is the standard for captions... just about all video players will, if captioning is present, allow the viewer to turn them on/off (default is off usually). YouTube and most other video hosting sites also allow you to embed an SRT file into your video.

There's a free program called subtitle edit (http://www.nikse.dk/subtitleedit). I've found it very handy for my own projects. Check it out. Most of the work involved is still typing out what is said... you may be able to find a voice-to-text conversion utility, but i've never looked into it that far.

IMO, YouTube auto-captioning is useless even with clear audio with vocals only.