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View Full Version : What type of 3D professional are you?



ShadowMystic
08-17-2012, 11:01 PM
Full-time Freelancer?
Salaried employee?
Part-time Need a day job?
Part-time Do not need a day job?


I hope I set thil poll up right...

SplineGod
08-17-2012, 11:45 PM
Pretty much full time freelancing for now.

Philbert
08-18-2012, 12:17 AM
Full time freelancing when I can find clients.

SplineGod
08-18-2012, 12:26 AM
I know...this job would be great if it wasnt for the clients... :)

khan973
08-18-2012, 04:19 AM
Full time employer :-)

Greenlaw
08-18-2012, 04:33 AM
Full-time employee but paid hourly, not salary. Also independent artist.

Andy Webb
08-18-2012, 04:34 AM
Full time freelancer, until the work dries up then retired until the next job :D

T-X
08-18-2012, 04:43 AM
Hobbyist at the moment, but make a little bit of money here and there.

Afalk
08-18-2012, 04:53 AM
I am a part time freelancer (now) simply because for me as a diabetic I really ahve to be able to guarantee that I have medical coverage, and the cost coering it individually let alone for any people I bring on for larger commercial projects was getting completely out of hand. So I hold down a 0530-1400 job that gives me full benefits and allows me to be back in the studio by 1430. Hardly ideal but I finegaled monday's off so I have at least one traditional day for client meetings and such. Its always a tradeoff - but w/the economy being so ****** here in the USA, I have been feeling a lot more drudge-like of late.

meshpig
08-18-2012, 04:56 AM
For what we do as corporate literary/media consultants my intermediate 3D/video saves us a shed load... been a long time since we've had to cater to individual clients thankfully.

cresshead
08-18-2012, 05:21 AM
fulltime employee but 3d is just part of my day job mainly product shots for advertising, packaging, product videos and web and previz of new product R&D.

and back home my own projects and also freelance work creating ibooks for a sports science company using 3d for creating illustrative artwork.

meshpig
08-18-2012, 05:31 AM
I am a part time freelancer (now) simply because for me as a diabetic I really ahve to be able to guarantee that I have medical coverage, and the cost coering it individually let alone for any people I bring on for larger commercial projects was getting completely out of hand. So I hold down a 0530-1400 job that gives me full benefits and allows me to be back in the studio by 1430. Hardly ideal but I finegaled monday's off so I have at least one traditional day for client meetings and such. Its always a tradeoff - but w/the economy being so ****** here in the USA, I have been feeling a lot more drudge-like of late.

Land of the free, Home of the brave... Emigrate! The "economy" is OK here and for the time being the PBHS (public benefit health scheme) is thinking logically.

geo_n
08-18-2012, 06:07 AM
Full-time employee but paid hourly, not salary. Also independent artist.

Same here. Lw does well with independent projects :thumbsup:

SplineGod
08-18-2012, 07:50 AM
Land of the free, Home of the brave... Emigrate! The "economy" is OK here and for the time being the PBHS (public benefit health scheme) is thinking logically.

That would be nice but since he has a preexisting condition I doubt he would be allowed to immigrate to Australia assuming its anything like NZ immigration policy. It took me 3 years and a massive amount of sufferin and patience to get my NZ residency. Im married to a kiwi and have been for 12 years and while doing my residency paperwork it was discovered I had kidney disease.
Unfortunatly Australia, New Zealand and most of pacifica are overloaded with aborigenes, maoris, polynesians etc that have a very high incidence of diabetes and kidney disease. In fact on NZ immigration site it specially says that kidney disease is grounds for automatic rejection and it literally was only by the grace of God I got mine....and I literally had to nearly die trying. Im dialysis here and thankfully so. :)
And in case anyone is wondering I could have recieved dialysis free in the USA, BUT when I became ill I couldnt travel, work etc.
So we couldnt get back the US to keep my wifes US greencard valid so she lost it. The card took her 7 years to get in the US. In the meantime
she was told by the US embassy that if she returned she would be arrested and thrown into an Immigration detention center for 6-24 months before
she could get before an immigration judge. I wasnt willing to do that which is why we fought it out here. :)

Markc
08-18-2012, 09:57 AM
After all you had to go through personally Larry, that is so ****ing ridiculous of the US immigration department :mad:

Nicolas Jordan
08-18-2012, 11:35 AM
I have been employed full time for over 5 years now mostly doing architectural renderings and animations. The economy is booming here mainly because of the lucrative potash and oil industries so that seems to be ensuring there is no shortage of work. I enjoy dabbling in other areas of 3d when I'm not at work to keep things a bit more interesting since most architectural jobs are very similar and can tend to get some what repetitive after years of working on them.

RudySchneider
08-18-2012, 12:46 PM
I originally got into LightWave because I wanted to create some 3D models and images to support sales proposals for an engineering firm where I was employed. While I'd consider myself more of a hobbyist, I've done a couple of paid freelance jobs. I have currently been looking for work for 21 months!

roboman
08-18-2012, 02:46 PM
Some where between "Part-time Freelancer, Need a day job" and "Just hobbyist". Well actually right now Just hobbyist. I quit doing animation / graphics for a while and am slowly working my way back to being able to do something that isn't to horrific. More like a "hobbyist who does some freelance work". I have no interest in doing this as my main job.

SplineGod
08-18-2012, 02:49 PM
Trust me, I agree completely. I feel for anyone who has ever tried to legally immigrate. Its why I get really angry with the fact that others can enter the country illegally and get special privilages and protections. We more then paid our dues only to lose it so easily...

prometheus
08-18-2012, 04:21 PM
Im full time employee at my current work since 2009, but 3d related stuff and lightwave renders are a very small percent of what I do amongst using illustrator,photoshop doing smaller ads, updating website, taking care of marketing and overall computer maintenance in the office.

a very small part right now doing 3d renders of some machines, but I think I will be doing more of that soon when we will start to work on new constructions that will be shown, and I will also start to work on showcasing full gym facilities as 3d plans soon, so some instancing of cardio and treadmills will utilize instance fx I guess.

Economics in sweden seems quite strong after all, but still we have a very high unemployment if you compare to 2006.
Very strange, when there was some good times, I was unemployed, and when there was economic crises, I got a full time job...seems just to be a matter of timing.

Michael

JonW
08-18-2012, 04:25 PM
Basically retired, I just do an odd job because I enjoy it and my accountant thinks it's worthwhile.

Serling
08-18-2012, 04:49 PM
Full-time Freelancer?
Salaried employee?
Part-time Need a day job?
Part-time Do not need a day job?


Full-time video editor who uses 3D (and motion graphics, like those generated in AE) as needed to create visuals for news stories and specials. I use 3D to convey information to viewers clearly and concisely: information that might otherwise be too difficult to understand in the course of a fast-paced news story or special.

For me, it's all about making complex stories easier to understand for the viewer. Insofar as 3D can help me do that, I use it.

I also use it in my freelance projects to enhance the look of corporate videos.

kopperdrake
08-18-2012, 05:11 PM
Another full-time employer. LW is about 70% of our work in some form of another, so we owe it a lot :thumbsup:

Ryan Roye
08-18-2012, 05:20 PM
Hardcore hobbyist here. Though perhaps when I finally get off my butt and put together a demo reel I can turn what I do regularly already into something I get paid regularly to do :)

meshpig
08-19-2012, 12:31 AM
That would be nice but since he has a preexisting condition I doubt he would be allowed to immigrate to Australia assuming its anything like NZ immigration policy. It took me 3 years and a massive amount of sufferin and patience to get my NZ residency. Im married to a kiwi and have been for 12 years and while doing my residency paperwork it was discovered I had kidney disease.
Unfortunatly Australia, New Zealand and most of pacifica are overloaded with aborigenes, maoris, polynesians etc that have a very high incidence of diabetes and kidney disease. In fact on NZ immigration site it specially says that kidney disease is grounds for automatic rejection and it literally was only by the grace of God I got mine....and I literally had to nearly die trying. Im dialysis here and thankfully so. :)
And in case anyone is wondering I could have recieved dialysis free in the USA, BUT when I became ill I couldnt travel, work etc.
So we couldnt get back the US to keep my wifes US greencard valid so she lost it. The card took her 7 years to get in the US. In the meantime
she was told by the US embassy that if she returned she would be arrested and thrown into an Immigration detention center for 6-24 months before
she could get before an immigration judge. I wasnt willing to do that which is why we fought it out here. :)

That's a terrible story and you're quite right. I'm living in the past as it used to be easier to get residency here before the whole toxic immigration debate arose in the late 90's.

ShadowMystic
08-19-2012, 12:35 AM
Hardcore hobbyist here. Though perhaps when I finally get off my butt and put together a demo reel I can turn what I do regularly already into something I get paid regularly to do :)

Get your ducks in a row and you (and your contributors) could turn a profit.

Shame its always so much more complicated that it would appear...

Waves of light
08-19-2012, 11:33 AM
Full time freelancer. I would say I use LW 20-30% for work paid work. Looking to increase this amount over the next year.

Just to give you an idea of where I have used LW; on one project (for a large UK children's hospital) I turned children's ideas into animated characters, to be used in an interactive questionnaire. LW allowed us to create and edit each character, develop and model their surrounds and props. We then rendered out different poses of the characters and turned those into Flash animated assets. With LW we were also able to render out the characters at large resolutions, to be used in marketing material for events.

Ricky.

RomanS
08-19-2012, 12:30 PM
Does LW based studio owner (7 employed LW artists) count also?

RayO3D
08-20-2012, 08:17 AM
I've been working full-time since 2002 and started using LW in mid-2007. My previous job was creating models that were etched inside of crystal for promotional items (give-a-ways, awards, Disney and Universal theme parks). Currently, I am serving as a modeler (as well as a developer for the past year) for teaching and training applications for college classrooms and workforce. Last year we switched to Unity and I was finally able to completely cut 3D Max out of our workflow.

Previously, I would do all of my modeling in LW and export to 3DS to use a proprietary tool for export to our development application. But since switching to Unity, I can now model and animate all in LW and probably haven't fired up Max in 3 months at least (and even then I think that was for a question from a student).

zapper1998
08-20-2012, 08:44 AM
Full-time employee but paid hourly. Also independent artist.

lertola2
08-20-2012, 04:08 PM
Full-time employee and all Lightwave all the time.

dblincoe
08-20-2012, 04:14 PM
Full time freelancer, all Lightwave. Zbrush is trying to creep in.

Snosrap
08-20-2012, 09:14 PM
Full-time salaried employee using LW everyday since starting with 5.6 in 1998.

Kryslin
08-20-2012, 11:49 PM
Hobbyist here, making a little extra cash on the side, but not enough to call it a job. Most of what I play around with is Lightwave, some Vue, some Rhino...

Kionel
08-21-2012, 01:17 PM
Part time freelancer, full-time day job. Was a full-time freelancer with a growing business in 2009, but my wife was diagnosed with MS, and the cost of her copaxone was so high that I would have had to do the work of three people to be able to cover it and normal expenses. Opted instead to return to IT and work part-time as a freelancer. Not a decision I liked, but that was necessary.

In the three years since her diagnosis she's been promoted, has had her own work insurance expanded, and is doing great. I'm still doing the crap IT job while also taking on clients whenever I can.

Make no mistake: If we had anything like the NHS here in the states, I would have NEVER returned to the corporate world. Even now, with my wife actually saying "Quit, build your business. You'll be happier!" I don't feel that I can. With the cost of her MS meds, we need some kind of safety net insurance-wise.

Sorry; didn't mean to grumble. Some days it just gets to me.

kopperdrake
08-23-2012, 04:46 AM
I hear you Tony, and feel for you. Your experience is typical of the reason I just can't believe we hear some in the US think the idea of a NHS-esque set up in the states is a bad thing. I myself am type1 diabetic. My wife has chronic asthma and other issues. The NHS allows us to both run our profitable companies, without the worry of paying for costly bills. Sure, we have prescription charges, but they are nothing in comparison to what I imagine you have to pay over there. Our profitable companies not only pay tax back into the system, they also allow us to pay for others to work on our projects. If we had no NHS the likellihood would be that I would have followed your path, and become an employee rather than an employer, and anyone dependent on our business would lose out - from our accountant, to the various freelancers that work with us, the local computer maintenance guys, the local shops we use as we're based in a home studio, the children who get to see us more, the time we can give them - it goes on and on. The knock-on effect is quite large when you really sit down and think about it.

Of course there are issues with the NHS, and there are days when I grumble. But every day I see the debates raging over there about your situation and I thank the heavens that we have it, warts and all.

You have every right to grumble, imho.

meshpig
08-23-2012, 07:02 AM
Part time freelancer, full-time day job. Was a full-time freelancer with a growing business in 2009, but my wife was diagnosed with MS, and the cost of her copaxone was so high that I would have had to do the work of three people to be able to cover it and normal expenses. Opted instead to return to IT and work part-time as a freelancer. Not a decision I liked, but that was necessary.


Copaxone here under the PBS you'd probably be paying $20-$30 per month even when you exceed the top income bracket as that's calculated out elsewhere. kopperdrake is on the money in terms of the "public benefit" not only because there's an huge economy of scale when .gov's purchase pharmaceuticals in bulk...:)

Edit: though I don't quite understand how it works in the US if say you slash your wrist on a broken bottle whilst putting the bins out like I did a few years ago early one morning. Wife nearly fainted with all the blood spurting everywhere. Ended up with 24 stitches, 8 of which were around the artery... ??

Roodie
08-23-2012, 07:16 AM
I was a freelancer waaay back (some 13 years ago), when 5.6 reigned supreme - mostly architectural visualizations and small animations for the local TV network at my hometown.

Then switched to web development as an employee - I had to drop 3D completely. Now that I have some time to spare, I thought it would be a good idea to pick 3D up again, so here I am. As a hobbyist right now, but who knows what the future brings :-)

roboman
08-24-2012, 10:22 PM
Edit: though I don't quite understand how it works in the US if say you slash your wrist on a broken bottle whilst putting the bins out like I did a few years ago early one morning. Wife nearly fainted with all the blood spurting everywhere. Ended up with 24 stitches, 8 of which were around the artery... ??

A fair number of small businesses and young people don't buy insurance. In that case, you go to the hospital, they treat you, then they try to figure out how to get you to pay. If they think you have any thing of value, or an income, they will try to put a lean on it. If not they will sell it to a debt collector who will spend the next 10 or 20 years trying to figure out a way to get you to pay.

It's a gamble. You don't pay extra in taxes to cover medical and don't buy insurance... you have more money. If you loose and have a medical problem you either have enough to cover it or get hounded for the money forever. Some people chose to get catastrophic care insurance. With that you pay any small medical bill out of pocket, but if you have a really large one the insurance covers it.

I don't know about animation studios, but a lot of engineering firms and machine shops just go with catastrophic care insurance. It's an option that fits with a lot of small businesses.

SplineGod
08-24-2012, 11:00 PM
It also varies from state to state. I have a brother in New Mexico (a state) who is one of the cronically unemployed and no health insurance. He is able to get free healthcare thru the state based on his income or lack of it. He doesnt pay anything except a small copay on medications. Where he does have to pay is in his time. Sometimes he has to sit for hours and hours in the lobby waiting for an appointment or waits for weeks to get to see a specialist. In that regard its not that different from New Zealand. My wife ( a kiwi) fractured one of her finger bones. We waited in the ER for about 5 hours before a triage nurse spoke to us. We were about the only ones there.... Then after seeing the nurse we waited another 3 hours before we saw a doctor. The first thing he did was grill me about how she broke her finger (she fell and caught herself badly and twisted it). He spent about another hour asking me questions that made it obvious that he was assuming it was wife abuse. Finally I stopped him and said, "could you please just treat my wife and we can get back to the questions later?" By the time we were done and out it was almost 11 hours.
There really is no national healthcare system as its handled on state by state basis. Theres many reasons why healthcare can cost so much in the US and should have been addressed before....like federal law prohibits purchasing insurance across state lines...dunno why that is but it gives some insurance companies almost a monopoly in some places since they have no competition. Malpractice insurance is very costly and expensive which also causes doctors to order unnecessary tests to cover their butts. The list goes on and on with fraud and abuses that raise prices.
With that said, many illnesses or conditions are covered by the federal govt in part or in full. For example I can get dialysis treatment in the US for free because its considered a permanent disability. There are also some very expensive treatments that are allowed under medicaid and medicare.. because they dont look at costs. An example is a new cancer therapy that uses the persons own DNA to target cancer cells...it costs about 90k a treatment in the US but IS covered by medicare. Alot of this is not information that is easily or obviously available so you have to dig.
Also if a person shows up at the ER and has no money, is an illegal alien etc...they cannot be turned away from being treated for any reason....its the law.
When I was in LA, I had catestropic insurance because my regular visits to the clinic were only about 35 bucks so no big deal and dental visits were about double that so again no big deal.
For a few years before moving to LA I was self employed and had decent insurance thru the National Association for the Self Employed.

meshpig
08-24-2012, 11:14 PM
A fair number of small businesses and young people don't buy insurance. In that case, you go to the hospital, they treat you, then they try to figure out how to get you to pay. If they think you have any thing of value, or an income, they will try to put a lean on it. If not they will sell it to a debt collector who will spend the next 10 or 20 years trying to figure out a way to get you to pay...

Thanks for that roboman. Sounds ghoulish. Curious because I pay something like $1400 annually to insure against injury which may happen at my place of business, which is unlikely because it's not a shop front full of employees but it isn't much more than that even if it was. For my own health insurance I'm better off just paying the extra tax rather than beat around the bush with private insurance which is hideously expensive even after the government throws billions at it.

It's interesting that in the 1950-60's here, before "free" healthcare which came in the 1970's the prisons were full off people who couldn't pay their hospital bills. Now it's for minor drug offences and unpaid parking tickets:)

meshpig
08-24-2012, 11:28 PM
It also varies from state to state. I have a brother in New Mexico (a state) who is one of the cronically unemployed and no health insurance. He is able to get free healthcare thru the state based on his income or lack of it. ...

Yes and you'll find in NZ like here that there are good hospitals and bad hospitals to have an accident near to. It strikes me that ER's however they're funded and even if they're funded well are subject to a multitude of extraneous factors. Where they become substitutes for general practice they're not so big on "customer service".

So what's the essence of the healthcare debate as it appears in the US now?

SplineGod
08-24-2012, 11:49 PM
I think the essense of it is not that people are against some form of affordable healthcare....but in the way Obama care itself was created and passed thru congress.
It was supposed to be a transparent process but never was. In the end congress produced a document that was over 2000 pages and probably not one congressman or senator read it. They were told that they "would have to pass it to find out what was in it". To this day I dont think anyone really understands whats in it or what it actually does. Theres a few parts that some point at but again, nobody really knows. It was supposed to save costs but costs are already going up and the administration granted thousands of waivers from it ranging from whole states to various corportations, unions etc because of it increasing costs.
Its also the issue that the government never before had the power to coerce its citizens into buying a product and some feel that this is a slippery slope because its sets a precident for the govt to some day require that you buy something else such as cabbage or whatever.
Its really two issues...HOW the law was passed, whats actually in it and then the whole healthcare debate. Some felt that instead of this huge massive overhaul that congresss should have done it brick by brick, allowing ppl to buy insurance across state lines to bring down costs due to competition, reform medical malpractice claims, reduce fraud and abuse and so on. Originally we were told that we would have to purchase health insurance or pay a penalty. The penalty would be paid by those ppl who, for whatever reason, chose not to have health insurance. We were told that it was a penalty not a tax. Now we find out its actually a tax. So again. it was unclear from the beginning what we were being sold and we still dont know whats in the law...in fact many aspects of this law are being wrtting and detailed out behind closed doors by bureaucrats. This will make it even more unclear how it will effect everyone and how it will effect businesses since business owners will be required to foot part of the bill. This is having a slowing effect on the economy some feel because it creates a lot of uncertainty for those wanting to hire more ppl as to how much it will cost to employ more ppl.
Some ppl have used this to claim that one side is against healthcare because they oppose this bill/law but thats not the case. Its just the way it was done and is being done and whether or not the country can afford it given the state of our economy.

meshpig
08-25-2012, 01:02 AM
...Its also the issue that the government never before had the power to coerce its citizens into buying a product and some feel that this is a slippery slope because its sets a precedent for the govt to some day require that you buy something else such as cabbage or whatever.

Sounds terribly complicated. I presume you mean business has to now compulsorily insure it's workers health whereas before it was voluntary, a bit like compulsory superannuation here except that there are various super products on the market? Business said the same thing back in the 80's but it's worked out.

Penalties, taxation... shareholder equity is pretty much the same thing. The only difference is the stock market isn't accountable for it's losses.

DigitalSorcery8
08-25-2012, 01:15 AM
Its also the issue that the government never before had the power to coerce its citizens into buying a product and some feel that this is a slippery slope because its sets a precident for the govt to some day require that you buy something else such as cabbage or whatever.
Give me a break. State governments have been doing this a LONG time. If you want to drive a car, you HAVE to buy car insurance. Why? Because you MAY hit someone. Why should you HAVE to buy health insurance? Because there will come a time when you WILL need it. Republicans have been for this since the early 90's - it was their responce to Hillary-care. THEY were the ones who wanted the mandate that everyone MUST buy health insurance. They've always been the ones that have said "personal responsibility." It wasn't until Obama AGREED with them that it become a hot-button issue.

Bullcrap.

We-Co
08-25-2012, 01:28 AM
Give me a break. State governments have been doing this a LONG time. If you want to drive a car, you HAVE to buy car insurance. Why? Because you MAY hit someone. Why should you HAVE to buy health insurance? Because there will come a time when you WILL need it. Republicans have been for this since the early 90's - it was their responce to Hillary-care. THEY were the ones who wanted the mandate that everyone MUST buy health insurance. They've always been the ones that have said "personal responsibility." It wasn't until Obama AGREED with them that it become a hot-button issue.

Bullcrap.

Republican or not, when has America ever done anything unselfish/non-greedy. It's all for the doe-rae-me-fa-so. What keeps us going is our military, Hollywood, and food. Otherwise we'd be in some serious debt... oh wait.

Anyway last time I got paid to use LightWave was years ago, and $100 bucks at that.

SplineGod
08-25-2012, 01:39 AM
I disagree... roads are built with taxpayer money. To personally use it is a priviledge not a right. Driving is engaging in SOMETHING. Not buying health insurance isnt engaging in anything let alone commerce. Does the govt have the power to mandate which car you drive or which car insurance policy you drive? The govt tried to sell the individual mandate under the commerce clause in the constitution which is the power of the congress to regulate commerce. The supreme court found that arguement unconstitutional but upheld it as a TAX since congress does have the power to tax.
Also not all states require car insurance to drive. Strangely enough New Zealand doesnt require it.
But again being against Obama care...the way it was conceieved, written, etc etc is NOT the same as being against affordable healthcare. Who wouldnt be for affordable healthcare? Being on dialysis and its associated health risks Im for affordable healthcare. Im not at in favor of how Obamacare came to be, how its forced upon citizens and the fact that nobody still knows whats in it. I also dont like that, again, certain groups get to be exempted from it. How can anyone think that such a monstrosity of a Bill can be good when it was done behind closed doors, rammed thru the way it was and the fact that nobody read it and the fact that few understand whats in it or how it will evolve. The uncertainly of its cost on small business is also slowing down economic growth.

meshpig
08-25-2012, 08:30 AM
What keeps us going is our military, Hollywood, and food.


Great aphorism!

- I caught a bus going down main street here a few years ago and as we passed Taco Bell a bunch of american teenagers leapt out of their seats to collectively gasp "Taco Bell", noses almost pressed to the window. Mother's milk and pre masticated mushy, comfort stuff.

- Hollywood has destroyed the film Industry here starting with Mel Gibson and the National Institute for Dramatic Arts (NIDA) a bigger bunch of utter wankers you'd hope never to have anything to do with. Then smack in the middle of Sydney, FOX studios. It's great if you own a lighting outfit or a catering van but it renders everything Hollywood. I mean for F's sake Nicole Kidman?

- My old man fought in Vietnam and I reckon it took me a good 20 years to get over his neurosis god help the same today.

We-Co
08-25-2012, 12:23 PM
Never said it was pretty. It's the money. Its always the money.

DigitalSorcery8
08-25-2012, 12:51 PM
I disagree... roads are built with taxpayer money. To personally use it is a priviledge not a right. Driving is engaging in SOMETHING. Not buying health insurance isnt engaging in anything let alone commerce. Does the govt have the power to mandate which car you drive or which car insurance policy you drive? The govt tried to sell the individual mandate under the commerce clause in the constitution which is the power of the congress to regulate commerce. The supreme court found that arguement unconstitutional but upheld it as a TAX since congress does have the power to tax.
Also not all states require car insurance to drive. Strangely enough New Zealand doesnt require it.
But again being against Obama care...the way it was conceieved, written, etc etc is NOT the same as being against affordable healthcare. Who wouldnt be for affordable healthcare? Being on dialysis and its associated health risks Im for affordable healthcare. Im not at in favor of how Obamacare came to be, how its forced upon citizens and the fact that nobody still knows whats in it. I also dont like that, again, certain groups get to be exempted from it. How can anyone think that such a monstrosity of a Bill can be good when it was done behind closed doors, rammed thru the way it was and the fact that nobody read it and the fact that few understand whats in it or how it will evolve. The uncertainly of its cost on small business is also slowing down economic growth.
LOL. WHO wouldn't be for affordable healthcare? The Republicans. As it was ORIGINALLY conceived, it was to be a single payer system like Medicare. You can thank the Republicans for what we eventually ended up with since they negotiated that right out immediately and then even the public option was off the table - something that I do blame Obama for since he didn't serisouly fight for either single payer OR the public option. Rep[ublicans have been against anything and everything regarding the government having to do with the healthcare system. They have NEVER agreed with Medicare and have not wanted the government involved with it or Social Security - hence their move to privatize it. And they find this all very difficult since the VAST majority of Americans are FOR Medicare as it is. My parents are on it and had Medicare not been around they would probably be dead by now.

The Republicans have done nothing but complain about it yet they've NEVER done anything to get affordable healthcare for everyone. They fought viciously against Medicare with Reagan ads telling us that it would "force doctors to work in certain areas and remove many freedoms." Well... that didn't pan out as they expected. And as a tax? Yeah, I think that's a good thing. Taxpayers are already paying (aside from roads and bridges) for MANY who go to the emergency room for treatment - many end up waiting to go for a long time because they don't have insurance. With preventive care it should reduce the cost of emergency room visits and end up costing the taxpayer less. Republicans have ALWAYS been for "personal responsibility" until Obama. Then they all got together and DECIDED to oppose everything during his term - and this is documented by Dems and Repubs - so that they could paint him as a losing president and regain power no matter how much it cost the American public. I would still much rather have single payer/Medicare for all, but the Republicans haven't allowed it. THEY are to blame. Oh yeah, and the Republicans also want to NOW "change" Medicare so that we would end up paying MORE for future healthcare.

How many other first-world nations don't have national healthcare? How many take care of the majority of their citizens? How long did it take the US to FINALLY get this far? And which political party held us back? You guessed it, Republicans. Democrats have ALWAYS been for affordable healthcare but Republicans have always blocked it since they have never believed that government should be involved at all. They believe that government should be involved in the more important aspects of life like procreation and who should marry who - you know, the bedroom aspects. "Let business take care of business and we'll take care of your morality."

You don't like how the Obama administration devised their healthcare bill? You can blame Republicans ENTIRELY for that. And I'm not joking.

Waves of light
08-25-2012, 01:03 PM
So this went a bit off-topic then? Politics eh.

DigitalSorcery8
08-25-2012, 01:25 PM
So this went a bit off-topic then? Politics eh.

Well... I guess that's what happens when people start commenting on healthcare systems and what they like/don't like about them. I certainly don't like having only one POV without any rebuttal. I'd be perfectly fine with the moderator removing all references to healthcare and politics in this thread. :thumbsup:

stiff paper
08-25-2012, 02:34 PM
Republican or not, when has America ever done anything unselfish/non-greedy.
Actually, just to touch on this subject, because it's something that a lot of people in the US simply don't seem to know about... but America did a lot of unselfish/non-greedy things after the 1930s, a period when most of the population had been having an awful, awful time. (Awful in this context meaning that many of them were lucky even to have gotten out of that period alive.)

So the USA can do and has done some very good things for its own people.

Ryan Roye
08-25-2012, 02:41 PM
Full-time Freelancer?
Salaried employee?
Part-time Need a day job?
Part-time Do not need a day job?


I hope I set this[sic] poll up right...

You forgot the "politically active" option ;)

DigitalSorcery8
08-25-2012, 02:42 PM
You forgot the "politically active" option ;)

And the "own your own company" option too.

ShadowMystic
08-25-2012, 02:48 PM
You forgot the "politically active" option ;)

No kidding. Argh, thread pirates, the lot of ya.

We-Co
08-25-2012, 05:18 PM
Sorry for taking over the thread. My political comments are stopping now. I don't even like politics :-D

Sanchon
08-25-2012, 09:54 PM
I'm Lightwave based studio owner from Poland. My company was established in 2002y. I have a lot of architectural orders. I work 10-15 hours per day :(

DigitalSorcery8
08-25-2012, 10:30 PM
I'm Lightwave based studio owner from Poland. My company was established in 2002y. I have a lot of architectural orders. I work 10-15 hours per day :(

We used to have that problem too, which is why we hired employees. When the crash hit in '08, most of the business went with it. :(

Waves of light
08-26-2012, 03:48 AM
I'm Lightwave based studio owner from Poland. My company was established in 2002y. I have a lot of architectural orders. I work 10-15 hours per day :(

Better to be busy than no work at all :thumbsup:

fablefox
08-26-2012, 04:39 AM
I'm a hobbyist right now, with a day job (non 3d) and a night class (to earn my degree). Wanted to have a job in 3d, but it seems that my skill is in programming (my logic is better than my artistic). So I might end up as Unity programmer before the end of the year, I hope.

meshpig
08-27-2012, 03:14 AM
... They fought viciously against Medicare with Reagan ads telling us that it would "force doctors to work in certain areas and remove many freedoms."

LOL... after a decade of the conservatives hacking away at the public health system here doctors are almost hard to find... 'cos they're always on holiday or the shop's closed for renovations.

Specialists are even worse; where a good one just used to be a good one now it's a matter of inverse competition where you pay one a shed load to refer you to his mate who then does the same tests or whatever and then you're kinda obliged to accept whatever rate 'cos a third opinion is only going to cost you more of the same.

All this here in case you're so flushed to the eyeballs with cash and think you're having a nervous breakdown... there'll be some private clinic to say there, there whilst they take you to the cleaners.

I mean for F's sake you just want to be able to see an intelligent GP who can refer you to an intelligent specialist if need be and to get whatever job done with a minimum of BS. It shouldn't be like buying a used car...

tonyhall007
08-27-2012, 03:22 AM
Full time Lightwave 3D trainer at Vision West Notts, in england.

meshpig
08-27-2012, 04:50 AM
Well it looks like the hobbyists have it currently... as Francis Bacon once said "art is a boring way of making money". An inveterate gambler for sure but one is a philosopher first before all this art appears.:)

gerry_g
08-29-2012, 05:45 PM
that's because he spent the majority of his life plagiarising his early success, art just became a day job to him, a way of making money. Was going to vote twice as a freelancer to even up the score but it didn't work.

meshpig
08-30-2012, 03:20 AM
...Was going to vote twice as a freelancer to even up the score but it didn't work.

That'd be cheating though...:D

... I don't think art became a day job for him so much as he was doing something other than simply making a living out of it, as opposed to say Andy Warhol in his later years.

- Just watched the Republican convention on PBS where Condoleezza Rice delivered about the most sentimental load of nonsense I've ever heard an intelligent person speak and Mitt's sidekick looks and sounds like he pulled himself up by the boot straps selling sub-prime mortgages.

Like it's OK if you don't take the bait and think the whole idea of being an artist is to make a living out of it..

Simon-S
08-30-2012, 06:32 AM
Full-time 3d artist plus freelance in my spare time.