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erikals
08-05-2012, 05:37 PM
From Walking In Place to Walking In Space

some generic info...
http://vimeo.com/46950369#

 

Ryan Roye
08-05-2012, 05:54 PM
That's what I love about animation...

No matter what software or method you use, the majority concepts and general approaches can be transferred from program to program or even medium to medium. Even if you used flash and did 2d work, a lot of the concepts in that program can also transfer to Lightwave and other 3d programs.

The tips shown in this tutorial can easily be applied to Lightwave.

erikals
08-05-2012, 06:53 PM
i wish i could find more tips like this, but it's basically just lots of 2D animation related stuff.

(not that that is a bad thing though, as it still applies...) :]

but finding 3D animation "tricks" is kinda hard...
probably because it's just small unnoticed tricks, unlike in 2D animation...

maybe time to check out the Jeff Lew tutorials...
 

allabulle
08-06-2012, 10:56 AM
Pretty nice. Thank you erikals.

mouse_art
08-06-2012, 12:37 PM
Not per se Tips, and not free, but...

http://animationclinic.com/cart/ Keith Lango's 60 hour training bundle for 99$
Here the list of every VTM.
http://animationclinic.com/cart/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=3&zenid=80fqckic6saa5pq42i33npstn4

It's Maya based, shouldn't be a problem.

lertola2
08-07-2012, 08:48 AM
The tips shown in this tutorial can easily be applied to Lightwave.

Care to give a hint on how to do this in lightwave? I have been puzzled by this myself. Was the maya tutorial an IK or an FK animation? He did not say but it looked like FK to me. In the beginning he talked about the importance of keeping the heal bone curve in the maya graph editor perfectly straight to keep the foot from sliding. So he must have been talking about position values. In lightwave you would not see anything like this as the position values of the heal bone would not be moving since movement of the heal is achieved by rotating the bones above it.

-Joe

erikals
08-07-2012, 09:25 AM
...where is RebelHill? :]

Ryan Roye
08-07-2012, 10:54 AM
There's actually many ways to do it in Lightwave... some methods are better in certain circumstances (IE: motion mixer I only recommend for when you have many repeating motions at work, and/or need to apply animations additively). He only touches on the tip of the iceburg in this tutorial... re-timing, adjusting the speed during animation, etc are things that are also critical to maximizing the ability to animate.

1) The graph editor in Lightwave (and many other programs) are similar to eachother. They all use the various curve types (bezier, linear, etc) thus if you know the graph editor in one program chances are you'll know them in another... even flash has these curves. Don't think chucking Lightwave is going to let you off the hook from graphs when dealing with animation ;)

2) The animation concerning what he was manipulating was IK. All he was doing was moving the leg IK "null/controller" as needed to remove slipping while the character turns.

3) The Lightwave equivalent of what he did in the beginning was "Align to path". I believe this can be enveloped on and off, but admittedly I haven't had a need to use it much other than for animating spaceships (its fun to do, try it!). This is found by selecting an item, hitting "M" and going to the "controllers and limits" tab.

4) IKBooster can achieve solid foot placement easily regardless of how the character turns, twists, or otherwise, but IKB exclusively for the legs involves baking for solid results (something you do after you finish animating). Personally, I still like normal full-time IK legs better and leave IKB to handle upper body movement, but can see where this would be advantageous.

5) The reason he emphasized the linear curve is so that the character doesn't hesitate or overshoot their step when transitioning between the end and the start of the looping cycle. When you're animating stuff at 24-40+ FPS, this can, at times, be extremely important for making believable, non-stuttering looping movements.

Finally, I highly, highly recommend Keyframe+ (http://www.lwplugindb.com/Plugin.aspx?id=10a0b4be) (AKA graphtype) regardless of what kind of rig or animation method you use (set it in place of the default "create key" hotkey). It basically allows you to change your keyframe's curve between linear, TCB etc without ever touching the graph editor. I use it most often to create step frames for TCB-curve items that are initially stationary to prevent slippage (note: you can also do this by setting TCB tension to "1", but requires more actions to do which is why I like step-frames better).

RebelHill
08-07-2012, 11:23 AM
Yeah...

Other than IKB there's really nothing in LW that lets you do this, and ofc that means using a full IKB setup (which sucks), no hybrid IK stuff. The best you can hope for otherwise is his approach after attaching the character root to the motion path... eyeball it.

Personally, ive never liked the animate in place, then move through space method, too much cleanup required on the feet. Better I find to just animate straight ahead in space, and that gives you much better returns on handling proper foot placement/stride length, etc.

The only downside is if you're doing an animation which requires action on the spot (like for a game or somesuch)... but even then I find the aniamte through space easier, as once done, you can bake everything (so down to FK) and then constrain the root back to the origin.

Dodgy
08-08-2012, 06:46 PM
4) IKBooster can achieve solid foot placement easily regardless of how the character turns, twists, or otherwise, but IKB exclusively for the legs involves baking for solid results (something you do after you finish animating). Personally, I still like normal full-time IK legs better and leave IKB to handle upper body movement, but can see where this would be advantageous.

You could use IKB on IK goals for the feet (rather than use straight IKB), however, and then bind the root null. This leads to only baking on the root null, which can be easily removed or changed, and the legs won't need baking... No foot slipping, due to IKB keeping the goals still, and no baking on anything other than the root null as the legs are driven by IK not IKB.

rednova
08-12-2012, 08:51 AM
Hi:

There is an excellent video tutorial by desktop images
called 'character animation basics' with Brian Freisinger.
It shows step by step how to animate a walk cycle in lightwave 3d.
Is very good !!!

erikals
08-12-2012, 09:12 AM
Desktop images shut down May 2012,...
Googling, i see that was only available on VHS though...

here is a free one,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvwnhLnk_WE