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View Full Version : small request to all the nice people who make tutorials for the rest of us to enjoy



zardoz
07-30-2012, 10:13 AM
after the longest thread title ever...

I think you (yes you who spend some of your time creating a tutorial to teach the rest of us, thank you by the way) could show the end result right at the beginning of the tutorial. You could say: this is what we are trying to achieve and I'll show you how to do it.
Most tutorials don't show the end result at the start and we follow one of you guys doing some very nice things but my brain is not understanding why you're doing it.

After seeing the end result I tend to watch the video from the start again and go: ahhh that's why he did this...

thanks
:beerchug:

wyattharris
07-30-2012, 12:13 PM
This is a good idea. I used to pick my written tutorials based on what the end result would be. Easy enough with a print document you just scroll to the end and see what it is. Video not so much.

shrox
07-30-2012, 12:22 PM
This is a good idea. I used to pick my written tutorials based on what the end result would be. Easy enough with a print document you just scroll to the end and see what it is. Video not so much.

Wow, by that avatar even Commander Riker uses Lightwave.

jeric_synergy
07-30-2012, 12:30 PM
And please speak clearly, evenly, and with good enunciation. No muttering or blurting.

Proton should be the model of clear speaking, IMO.

(I know they're free, so perhaps that's ungracious. My apologies. Still, if someone were putting out blurry pamphlets, they'd want to know, right?)

shrox
07-30-2012, 01:23 PM
And please speak clearly, evenly, and with good enunciation. No muttering or blurting.

Proton should be the model of clear speaking, IMO.

(I know they're free, so perhaps that's ungracious. My apologies. Still, if someone were putting out blurry pamphlets, they'd want to know, right?)

Yes, and well written tutorials are still in demand.

wyattharris
07-30-2012, 01:36 PM
Wow, by that avatar even Commander Riker uses Lightwave.
Just don't call me #2. :D

Ryan Roye
07-30-2012, 01:45 PM
My #1 nitpicks are volume and length.

-The majority of tutorial content out there (this is across all programs, actually) has narration that is so quiet I have to turn my volume way up. Then when I go to any other video or use any other application I get my ears blasted if I don't turn it down immediately afterward. Audio can usually be adjusted via a free program like audacity, or directly through the video editing program.

-Many tutorials don't cut out long pauses or material that is not beneficial to the viewer (IE: Waiting for something to load). There is no reason not to cut that out of the tutorial.

I agree that tutorials need to always show the result beforehand... or at least an example of a practical application.

I suppose another common gripe could be not zooming in on things when it would otherwise be difficult to read or see due to video quality... a lot of videos have this problem. If you're clicking through options, and the resulting video of you doing that only shows fuzz that part of the tutorial is useless.

jeric_synergy
07-30-2012, 01:47 PM
I agree that tutorials need to always show the result beforehand... or at least an example of a practical application.
That approach probably keeps presenters focused as well.

Philbert
07-30-2012, 02:04 PM
Agreed It always bothers me when I start a tutorial and have no idea what it's leafing me into.

BigHache
07-30-2012, 02:09 PM
Good tips! I've only made a few tutorials and it's actually not a fast process. I sit down and write a script first, then read it aloud a few times to make sure pacing is good and it makes sense, and I won't stumble over it. What I could add to make them better is to even re-record audio after making the final edit to remove any stuttering. I think for one 10m tutorial I spend 5 hours?

Ryan Roye
07-30-2012, 02:25 PM
Good tips! I've only made a few tutorials and it's actually not a fast process. I sit down and write a script first, then read it aloud a few times to make sure pacing is good and it makes sense

I script my tutorials as well... if I did it impromptu I'd probably be saying "uhhh" constantly and generally sound like a moron. I also feel it cuts down on the length of the tutorial significantly, leaving only the most relevant content to be shown and heard. It certainly isn't the fastest way, but I like the results.

Philbert
07-30-2012, 02:34 PM
Yeah my 3D World tutorial had a few uhs and ums even with scripting. I usually record the audio after the video. It's to distracting to do them both at the same time.

jeric_synergy
07-30-2012, 03:14 PM
I script my tutorials as well... if I did it impromptu I'd probably be saying "uhhh" constantly and generally sound like a moron.
Bless you! :thumbsup:

Certain videos on YouTube I simply can't watch because the audio is amazingly annoying: either a brutal monotone, or an endless series of "uhhhhhs" and "y'knowwwww"s, or "huh!"s.

I have sympathy: It's really quite hard to speak extemporaneously without doing such vocalizations, without a lot of public speaking experience. --Sympathy, but no patience, since after all these are recorded. If one screws up, one can start again. Or edit.

I also feel it cuts down on the length of the tutorial significantly, leaving only the most relevant content to be shown and heard. It certainly isn't the fastest way, but I like the results.
It really makes Proton's stuff more impressive, don't it? The other thing Proton did was pre-build boring stuff: I really don't want to watch a LW presenter build yet another damn 1000x1000 flat plane.

Brisk is good.

It's ironic that in a field devoted to presentation, etc etc etc

ShadowMystic
07-30-2012, 03:23 PM
That's why I am so impressed by Andrew Kramer at VideoCopilot. His presenting style is abit silly but its entertaining, informative, and generally well paced. I've also been able to remember tools that appear in certain tuts because of one of his tangents.(though some people say he wastes time,whatever)

zardoz
07-30-2012, 03:43 PM
One of my teachers in college had her classes scripted.even the jokes.and the jokes help us remember a lot.one of my main problems with tutorials is with nodes.sometimes the math isn't simple and not understanding what is the final goal, or each step can be confusing."now connect a multiply node to a spot node and then a dot product, etc." its not necessary to explain the math behind each step, only why you're doing it, why is the meaning of connecting that new node. explaining the steps ahead is essential. Its like following a recipe without understanding each step...you memorize what you're told and don't understand it, this way you can't apply it in other situations.

Serling
07-30-2012, 04:32 PM
Agreed It always bothers me when I start a tutorial and have no idea what it's leafing me into.

I hate being leafed anywhere. :D

jeric_synergy
07-30-2012, 04:38 PM
Yeah, the nodes tutorials can be exceptionally mysterious. I'm glad people are generous enough to create them, but in the midst of it I find myself thinking "What the hell is going on? What is the rationale here?"

shrox
07-30-2012, 04:43 PM
Yeah, the nodes tutorials can be exceptionally mysterious. I'm glad people are generous enough to create them, but in the midst of it I find myself thinking "What the hell is going on? What is the rationale here?"

Yes, I'd like to get my noodle around nodes.

jeric_synergy
07-30-2012, 05:26 PM
I suspect the commercial node DVDs are much more step by step.

madno
07-31-2012, 12:19 AM
First, thanks alot to all the generous people making free tuts (without them it would be much more pain to understand LW). To make them even better, consider to enter a cut where repetitive tasks are shown. This is even true for commercial ones. I bought one for UV mapping in 3D-Coat. The presenter showed a dinosaur and endlessly added one seam after the other. And maybe another request. Try before record. Sometimes the videos show step 1, step 2, and then: "oh, mhhh, strange ..., its not working like this, maybe you can do this, or, no wait, where was this tool ... "
But hey, thanks anyway for the time you invest. Its very appreciated.

Silkrooster
07-31-2012, 12:29 AM
Yes, I'd like to get my noodle around nodes.

Man, perverted jokes could be made from that. LOL...

zardoz
07-31-2012, 02:12 AM
yes I am very thankful to those who take time to create tutorials, video or text. I guess these are simply some tips to try to make them better. But if I have, I will go through the most boring tutorial in the planet if there's something to learn there.

RebelHill
07-31-2012, 06:34 AM
one of my main problems with tutorials is with nodes. sometimes the math isn't simple and not understanding what is the final goal, or each step can be confusing...

its not necessary to explain the math behind each step, only why you're doing it, why is the meaning of connecting that new node.

Yeah...

You see therein lies the problem, because with nodes, very often, the answer to the question "why/what is the meaning?" IS math... you can only answer the question in context of the numbers or operator being used.

Btw...

http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?p=1259612

torturebori007
08-03-2012, 08:43 AM
man, perverted jokes could be made from that. Lol...

hahahahaha

wyattharris
08-03-2012, 10:42 AM
Man RH, you alright bro. :thumbsup:

And dopey me. I should've known MOD stood for Modulo. I don't know why I always assume because its 3D its got to be something I've never heard of.

COBRASoft
08-03-2012, 11:07 AM
Videocopilot is amazing. I've seen them all and learned a lot.

The great thing with his tuts is that you have an actual result and a start from nothing. Most LW tuts start somewhere or stop somewhere half way. I remember a tut about lighting in Layout. Nice explained, at the end there was a picture, post processed in PhotoShop and it looked 10x better. Unfortunately the guy didn't explain how to achieve this result in PhotoShop.

P.S.: we need DPont's nodes explained. 1 by 1 :).

dwburman
08-03-2012, 11:33 AM
Thank you for the feedback. There are some great suggestions in this thread, some of which should be easy and cheap to implement.

One thing to keep in mind is that, as BigHache indicated, making a polished tutorial takes a lot more time than just recording something. Some people choose to edit videos (including removing ums and ahs as well as cutting out mistakes), while others just record in chunks and if things go too wrong, they rerecord the section.

If someone is selling tutorials as a way to earn income, he/she has to consider how much income he/she is likely to get from sales when determining how much time to spend making a video. It is not a huge market.

Someone who is making tutorials just for the fun of it, or because they are paid to do it may choose to spend more time polishing things without it feeling that it takes away from more profitable work.

Personally, I spend a bit more time editing my commercial tutorials than my freebies. I generally record the audio as I go, but I have revoiced some sections when I think of better ways to describe what I'm showing. It usually takes a few practice runs before I get to a take I like, and even then things can go wrong. Showing how to recover from mistakes can be an important lesson as well, although it can be frustrating watching the presenter try to figure out what went wrong when you know because you saw it happen. :)

jeric_synergy
08-03-2012, 11:34 AM
P.S.: we need DPont's nodes explained. 1 by 1 :).
Yes, voluminously, with working examples, and in words of one syllable.

:agree:

dwburman
08-03-2012, 11:36 AM
I once bought an Amiga magazine because it had a Brilliance tutorial in it, only to find that the thing that attracted me to the image on the cover (a lens flare, of all things) was actually made in another program altogether.

I agree on the dpont node thing, too:)


Videocopilot is amazing. I've seen them all and learned a lot.

The great thing with his tuts is that you have an actual result and a start from nothing. Most LW tuts start somewhere or stop somewhere half way. I remember a tut about lighting in Layout. Nice explained, at the end there was a picture, post processed in PhotoShop and it looked 10x better. Unfortunately the guy didn't explain how to achieve this result in PhotoShop.

P.S.: we need DPont's nodes explained. 1 by 1 :).

kevman3d
08-04-2012, 09:24 PM
Great thread... :thumbsup:

Always good to hear feedback on what people like and dislike. Its kinda hard getting feedback like this in general - some people will post ideas and critique like this thread, but then some people will just tolerate issues, some people will ***** and moan somewhere online but never comment back to the artist.


I think you (yes you who spend some of your time creating a tutorial to teach the rest of us, thank you by the way) could show the end result right at the beginning of the tutorial. You could say: this is what we are trying to achieve and I'll show you how to do it

Good comment - I always try start my long training with an "Intro" video that shows a few images of the results and give a nice welcome to the project. Not always the case with short freebee's, but I will consider that idea... The reason is usually because long project-based training takes a while to get to the final result. Short videos tend to be like an exercise of sorts, rather then a project.

But I guess its not hard to just cut in a "Welcome, and here's what we'll be doing" at the start of the videos prior to uploading. Good suggestion.


Audio can usually be adjusted via a free program like audacity, or directly through the video editing program.

Not just volume, but there's plenty of stuff that can be done to improve audio. What I do (including for my Youtube vids) is use Audacity, Noise-reduce (to remove hums), Volume adjust (to make it louder/quieter dependant on the recording) and then has the bass frequencies boosted up to fatten the usual "tinny" nature of microphone recordings. Then its dubbed back onto the video...

Its another step, but in the end I always feel its well worth the trouble. And Audacity can create chains (actions, as it were) so it becomes a couple of clicks and your done.

The only real problem I get with audio is making sure to trim the facial hair. Nothing screws up your audio more then the scratching sounds of a beard across the microphone sitting under your chin! :tongue:


I script my tutorials as well... if I did it impromptu I'd probably be saying "uhhh" constantly and generally sound like a moron.

lol! Yeh, tell me ... Ummm ... About it, eh, I think. :D

What I tend to do is not script, but sit and do the process a couple of times. Repeat a process, get the niggles out of the way, familiarise and then record. It sometimes takes a few tries to iron out the slip-ups, but it also works as well.

But I think the approach of recording the process and talking over it can also work well. My main reason for not doing that comes from the classroom where you can't show students something without saying anything, and then repeat... Probably just a habitual thing.