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filmjeff
06-27-2012, 12:01 PM
I was having trouble rendering a scene in LW 11 on my five year old Mac Pro. I'd get these out of memory errors and frequent crashes. Newtek recommended 8 Gb of RAM and I had only 4. Since my old video card was also getting twitchy (and I am in the middle of a big job I'm trying to finish), I felt I had no choice but to buy a new Mac Pro (Quad Core, 3.2 Ghz, 12 Gb RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5870). Can you imagine my disappointment after all the hassles of migrating files and re-installing that I STILL get out of memory errors and crashes? FYI, the scenes have about 800K polys. Here is the sequence of messages I receive if I manage to complete rendering one of the many passes I need to complete a scene and try to start another:
•Out of memory while rendering.
•Not enough memory for object polygon data
•The mesh could not be generated. Treating polygons as faces.... (CRASH)

It should be noted that I am forced to run in 32 bit mode because there are no QuickTime rendering options available on a Mac in 64 bit mode (a long sad story from Newtek that has to do with not paying Apple for QT for that particular configuration). I would love to know if other Mac users have these problems and if they have come up with a work-around.

Cryonic
06-27-2012, 12:19 PM
Why not render to images and then compile those images into a QT video?

page 27, "Creating a Slideshow or Animation from Still Images" http://www.apple.com/quicktime/pdf/QuickTime7_User_Guide.pdf

Phil
06-27-2012, 12:19 PM
No such issues here. I've had enormous scenes rendering happily, but my first thought is that perhaps you need to reconsider the way that you are rendering. It's really not a good idea to render directly to Quicktime (or indeed any animation format) - any failure during rendering will leave you with a corrupted movie file and you'll have to start over. It's far better to render to stills and then process these into an animation format later (you can even do this within LW itself).

I'm also wondering if that 800k poly count includes any render-time subdivision. It's quite possible to set that so high that you do indeed run out of memory. Note also that FiberFX can generate significant memory loads, so it might also be good to hear what else beyond your 800k poly count needs to be crunched during rendering.

filmjeff
06-27-2012, 12:53 PM
The scenes I'm having trouble with do not use dynamics, fibre effects, or high levels of sub-D. What I was told by Newtek this morning is that under 32 bit mode, there is a 2 Gb limit on RAM, meaning in my case that 10 Gb of RAM are not being used. I think I have to find a way to render out still sequences while in 64 bit mode, but I've never done this before. I'm prepared to adjust my workflow, but I've just scanned through the Layout manual and I'm not finding references to the best way to do this and keep my needed alpha channels. Suggestions?

BeeVee
06-27-2012, 02:43 PM
Render to PNG32 files.

B

ShadowMystic
06-27-2012, 03:22 PM
The scenes I'm having trouble with do not use dynamics, fibre effects, or high levels of sub-D. What I was told by Newtek this morning is that under 32 bit mode, there is a 2 Gb limit on RAM, meaning in my case that 10 Gb of RAM are not being used. I think I have to find a way to render out still sequences while in 64 bit mode, but I've never done this before. I'm prepared to adjust my workflow, but I've just scanned through the Layout manual and I'm not finding references to the best way to do this and keep my needed alpha channels. Suggestions?

The memory access limit is universal to all 32bit programs

Process for converting still sequence to animation through Lightwave:
1. Open new scene.
2. Go to Image Editor
3. Load... Load first image of your sequence.
4. Change Image Type to Sequence.
5. Go to Compositing Options
6. Set background image to your sequence.
7. Set your Render range to the length of your sequence.
8. Render.

Dexter2999
06-27-2012, 03:25 PM
By re-evaluating your workflow you can avoid your problem.

Do not render straight to Quicktime.
This means you can use the 64bit mode and use more memory.
Render to an image sequence.
You can use QuicktimePro to assemble the image sequence into a MOV.

Yes, this adds a step to your process but opens up LW to take advantage of all the money you poured into buying this system instead of crippling yourself by insisting on going straight to Quicktime and working in a 32bit environment.

filmjeff
06-27-2012, 03:59 PM
Thanks to all who contributed to upgrading my ignorance as well as my new work flow. See? This is what happens when you are self-taught and there's no one looking over your shoulder to set you straight. I appreciate everyone's understanding and expertise!

ShadowMystic
06-27-2012, 04:49 PM
Thanks to all who contributed to upgrading my ignorance as well as my new work flow. See? This is what happens when you are self-taught and there's no one looking over your shoulder to set you straight. I appreciate everyone's understanding and expertise!

I am mostly self-taught as well. I am considering doing a short tutorial on the stills to animation simply because I've typed it so many times.

Ryan Roye
06-27-2012, 05:16 PM
If quicktime gives you trouble, or you just want a very lightweight program for compiling your image sequences I highly recommend VirtualDub (also a free program). In the program all you do is drag-n-drop the first file (which loads the sequence), select your video compression/FPS and save whatever movie file you like.

filmjeff
06-27-2012, 11:01 PM
Thanks, but as it turns out, as I do my comps in After Effects CS6 I discovered that on Import I only have to point to the first frame of the sequence and AE automatically does the rest, treating the sequence of stills as if it were a movie file. If I need to make actual movies later, I'll probably try the LW re-compositing technique as it sounds pretty straightforward. I'm assuming for this to work, though, that I will have to run LW in 32 bit mode to get the QT options I'd prefer but at that point memory shouldn't be an issue.

Danner
06-28-2012, 07:02 AM
I had to go 64 bit a few years ago because I was running out of memory and have never looked back (well except for a few legacy plugins now and then). It is always a better idea to render out sequences, that way you can pause and resume and rerender only parts of it if it's necesary.
The PNG format gives you the best of both worlds. Lossless alpha enabled format(like TGA or TIF) but also with compression (like JPG).

Now in LW 11 many things can be done with instancing and that means huge memory savings.

Chuck
06-28-2012, 11:50 AM
I was having trouble rendering a scene in LW 11 on my five year old Mac Pro. I'd get these out of memory errors and frequent crashes. Newtek recommended 8 Gb of RAM and I had only 4. Since my old video card was also getting twitchy (and I am in the middle of a big job I'm trying to finish), I felt I had no choice but to buy a new Mac Pro (Quad Core, 3.2 Ghz, 12 Gb RAM, ATI Radeon HD 5870). Can you imagine my disappointment after all the hassles of migrating files and re-installing that I STILL get out of memory errors and crashes? FYI, the scenes have about 800K polys. Here is the sequence of messages I receive if I manage to complete rendering one of the many passes I need to complete a scene and try to start another:
•Out of memory while rendering.
•Not enough memory for object polygon data
•The mesh could not be generated. Treating polygons as faces.... (CRASH)

It should be noted that I am forced to run in 32 bit mode because there are no QuickTime rendering options available on a Mac in 64 bit mode (a long sad story from Newtek that has to do with not paying Apple for QT for that particular configuration). I would love to know if other Mac users have these problems and if they have come up with a work-around.

The memory problem is running in 32-bit mode, and the system change would not change that issue.

Also, the only story, "long, sad" or otherwise, with regard to Quicktime and Apple's 64-bit OS is simply that Apple is deprecating support for QuickTime and has not ported the Quicktime developer libraries to 64-bit. Apple does not charge registered developers in such a piecemeal fashion as to require separate payment for something like 64-bit Quicktime; it just doesn't exist. We are exploring workarounds for allowing the 64-bit LightWave to use the 32-bit libraries but there are a lot of difficulties with that and we haven't gotten them sorted yet (and really can't promise that it is a sortable problem, but we're working on it).

Rendering to frames and then compiling the animation using Quicktime Pro is a very easy workaround for this situation, and in most production environments rendering to frames is standard in order to avoid the issues with trying to render an animation format which any number of events might interrupt.

Darth Mole
06-28-2012, 12:30 PM
On a Mac, I use QuickTime 7 to open an image sequence and save as a .mov file. Shift-Apple-O, and point it at the first frame in the folder. Simple.

Chuck
06-28-2012, 01:29 PM
Thanks, but as it turns out, as I do my comps in After Effects CS6 I discovered that on Import I only have to point to the first frame of the sequence and AE automatically does the rest, treating the sequence of stills as if it were a movie file. If I need to make actual movies later, I'll probably try the LW re-compositing technique as it sounds pretty straightforward. I'm assuming for this to work, though, that I will have to run LW in 32 bit mode to get the QT options I'd prefer but at that point memory shouldn't be an issue.

That would be correct; and I see now that I've read through the thread that folks have covered a variety of approaches including the one I recommended. Thanks to everyone for the very responsive answers here - LightWave has a great community! :)

ShadowMystic
06-28-2012, 01:36 PM
Thanks, but as it turns out, as I do my comps in After Effects CS6 I discovered that on Import I only have to point to the first frame of the sequence and AE automatically does the rest, treating the sequence of stills as if it were a movie file. If I need to make actual movies later, I'll probably try the LW re-compositing technique as it sounds pretty straightforward. I'm assuming for this to work, though, that I will have to run LW in 32 bit mode to get the QT options I'd prefer but at that point memory shouldn't be an issue.

If you have after effects just compile in that! Or even Adobe Me use l I us.dia Encoder if you have I. I use after effects because you can control output quality and file size. There's no reason to lw for that then

JonW
06-28-2012, 04:06 PM
Process for converting still sequence to animation through Lightwave:
1. Open new scene.
2. Go to Image Editor
3. Load... Load first image of your sequence.
4. Change Image Type to Sequence.
5. Go to Compositing Options
6. Set background image to your sequence.
7. Set your Render range to the length of your sequence.
8. Render.

This works really well. (there is a video tutorial somewhere on this, someone may know the link)


On a Mac, I use QuickTime 7 to open an image sequence and save as a .mov file. Shift-Apple-O, and point it at the first frame in the folder. Simple.

Quicktime 7 works well also.


Rendering frames, get the old computer working with Screamernet, no point letting it have some time off!