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View Full Version : Advice for photoshop and painting.



4dartist
06-21-2012, 02:05 PM
I was a little curious about something. I seem to always be painting textures in photoshop from scratch. I almost always need to paint grunge or dirty up things. LIke maybe texturing a space capsule that came into the atmosphere. I try to come up with brushes using spacing and random rotation to get a nice dirty spray, but I'm never blown away by it. As I scale the brush up the texture is just blurry..

So my questions.. I can find a billion stamp style brushes where you click once to place the grunge down or whatever the brush is.. but are there good brushes out there for painting?

nickdigital
06-21-2012, 02:13 PM
Have you done a web search? There are ton of custom brushes out there...a lot are free to download.

Also having a Wacom tablet is necessity for any fine control.

archijam
06-21-2012, 02:31 PM
.. plus making your own PS brushes is very easy (and useful) ..

4dartist
06-21-2012, 03:28 PM
nickdigital: Yes. That's where I have been finding tons of brushes that seem to be stamp brushes. They are brushes that you just click down an image instead of actually painting with them.

Examples: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2008/11/10/50-must-have-photoshop-brushes/

archijam: I'm going to have to try to do that..

gerry_g
06-23-2012, 05:03 PM
brushes tend to look stamped to me, yes they can be good but I much prefer to blend real textures downloaded from texture sites like this one
http://www.cgtextures.com/ I find I block the areas in quicker and if I still want to use brushes to finesse them further I can

DrStrik9
06-25-2012, 02:53 PM
brushes tend to look stamped to me, yes they can be good but I much prefer to blend real textures downloaded from texture sites like this one
http://www.cgtextures.com/ I find I block the areas in quicker and if I still want to use brushes to finesse them further I can

Yes. For me, brushes not so much. I tend to use photos (stock, my own shots, etc), and layers with alpha masks mostly containing other related textures. High res shots of old paper, leather, metal, grungy ground shots, etc. work well in all kind of different situations. Then I use simple soft-edged brushes at various sizes and opacities for revealing channels, masks, parts. "Simple" UV maps become huge files, sometimes with dozens of layers.

Over time I've become a "distortion addict," using all Photoshop's Transform tools, Liquify, and Puppet Warp, which is truly a godsend for exquisitely bending photo textures around curves.