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silviotoledo
04-25-2012, 02:58 PM
How much energy ( in Kilowatts ) your computer consumes when rendering?

I reffer to a computer wich is rendering full time.

the account would be:
------------------------------
Watts x hours x days = kWatts
------------------------------

example:
550 w source power x 24 hours x 30 days / 1000 = 396 kW


But this only is real if it consumes all the source power. So

Does a renderfarm computer uses all the source power during rendering? If not, how much percent average?


I need to calculate this because energy tax in my city is

$ 0,24 dollars per kW what is too much money. So need to know more about rendering consum after buying machines to render or the energy consum will kill me.

This is around $ 95 dollars per month per computer... if I use 50 computers will pay almost 5 k dollars energy account.

Hieron
04-25-2012, 03:30 PM
the account would be:
------------------------------
Watts x hours x days = kWatts
------------------------------


That would be /1000 = kWh's (kilowatt hours)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilowatt_hour



Does a renderfarm computer uses all the source power during rendering? If not, how much percent average?

Hard to say, depends on your hardware and power supply. Do know though that a power supply is not 100% efficient itself and is most efficient at medium loads.




This is around $ 95 dollars per month per computer... if I use 50 computers will pay almost 5 k dollars energy account.

Yes it is not cheap if you run them 24/7.
But buying 50 pc's, installing os's, running projects on them 24/7 is not cheap either? Buying a decent set of nodes will set you back 500$ per piece at the very least if you go consumer grade. So that is 25k$, which is written off in about 3 years. Add OS and labor and you are going way up.

If you are considering to buy cheap/old/2nd hand pc's: imho, don't.


ps: if you go and buy a consumer grade single cpu machine without gpu, I doubt it will get over 200 watts power draw at the socket.

silviotoledo
04-25-2012, 03:39 PM
Thanks Hieron

yeah, I forgot the /1000

for operational system it's less expensive to buy an annual licence wich is so cheap related to individual licences.

We have here the most expensive energy tax in the world

Hieron
04-25-2012, 03:44 PM
I'm surprised indeed... I guessed it would have been cheaper in Brazil, don't you guys have oil and stuff? :)

I think it is about 0.24 euro here though, so it is actually more expensive.

For our office, energy is included in the (ridiculous) rent, so we did check powerdraw but thankfully do not pay (directly) for it.

RudySchneider
04-25-2012, 03:45 PM
Generally, the power company runs wires to your house/business of the appropriate size to accommodate some standard power rating. This is the kilowatt rating of the power supplied to your facility. If you have have items that consume more power --- such as pumps for a pool and/or spa for a residence --- then the power company may install larger gauge wires to accommodate this increased power requirement.

Then, if you look at a power bill, you'll see two charges: one for the amount of power available (due to the size of the wire gauge), as well as a charge for the kilowatt-hours you consume. So, even if you use no electricity for a given billing cycle, you would be charged just for the fact that the company made the power available to you. Then, if you run your pool pump, or air conditioner, or render farm, you pay for the amount of energy you consume (kilowatt-hours, as Hieron mentioned).

silviotoledo
04-25-2012, 03:57 PM
A friend said me that pays only 6 euros per month in Portugal. No matter how much energy consums it's fixed tax. That's why he has a renderfarm at a Technology Fundation in Portugal.

So I think I pay too much here in Brazil.

Another problem is that in Brazil we have always hot time, so we also need refrigeration systems all the time for computers what consumes more energy.

So, computer at rendering does not full load the power source?

Hieron
04-25-2012, 04:03 PM
No, the power supply is not fully loaded per se. A power supply is rater for delivery of x watts, does not have to at all.

6 euro per month sounds odd, especially if he can run a renderfarm on it. Unless he has the same construction as we do, and energy prices are averaged and calculated in the building/office rent.

silviotoledo
04-25-2012, 04:08 PM
No, the power supply is not fully loaded per se. A power supply is rater for delivery of x watts, does not have to at all.


Any idea about how much percent is loaded in general?

Complex scenes wich requires more memory and all the processing cores will require more power right?

Lightwolf
04-25-2012, 04:10 PM
So, computer at rendering does not full load the power source?
My workstation (i7-2600K) pulls less than 200W when running on full CPU load (idle GPU) rendering. More like 180W or so. (this is measured between the PSU and the power outlet).
On idle it's less than 70W (again, including a GPU which draws around 20W idle when running with two displays).
The current 8-core AMDs (Bulldozer) use around 90-100W more on load.
Single socket 2011 i7s (6-core) would also use around 100W more (the chipset is more complex).
The to be released Ivy-Bridge CPUs (quad, i7, socket 1155) would use 30W less under load.

So, compared to my rig (i7-2600K - 180W), running on full load:
i7-3930K - 280W
AMD FX-8150 - 270W-280W
Ivy-Bridge i7-377K - 150W

With a margin of error of -10W to +20W depending on the motherboard, components, PSU, etc...
You can do the maths from here. If you have benchmarks that are close to your load (i.e. rendering) you can compute the benchmark/W to get a decent value for the efficiency.
Mind you, eventually you'll also need to include the price for the rig itself as well, which is why a less power efficient set-up that is faster per €/US$ for the price of the base rig may be preferable.

Cheers,
Mike

silviotoledo
04-25-2012, 04:24 PM
Found this free software:

Edison 1.0.3166.0

it shows the amount of energy your computer consums and how much you saved.

Will try it now.

Hieron
04-25-2012, 04:25 PM
I would suggest to buy a cheap energy meter that goes between your pc and the socket.

Surely, if you consider buying and running a 50+ pc renderfarm that is a doable investment? :)

silviotoledo
04-25-2012, 04:40 PM
Thanks Lightwolf. Great info!

yeah Hieron, I was trying this free software energy measurer ( Edison 1.0.3166.0 ), but my firewall did not open the door anyway for register :).
Will ask some eletric engeneer how would I be able to measure.

Althought there's some rendering services companies, I also need computers to work and simulation calculations and sometimes a renderer near me.

dwburman
04-25-2012, 10:47 PM
One of my Uninterruptable Power Supply (UPS) has as LCD display that can show the amount of power being drawn. It's probably not super accurate, but it better than guessing. :)

I have a scene rendering now & the PSU is reporting the computer is using 189kW. That's a computer with an i7 2600 CPU, 4 sticks of RAM (16GB total), a graphics card, an additional firewire/USB card, 4 internal Hard Drives, & one monitor that's plugged into the UPS.

For a render node, it'd just be one HDD, 4 sticks of RAM, and the CPU & Motherboard. You wouldn't need the graphics card, monitor or any extra expansion cards.

JonW
04-25-2012, 11:31 PM
6 computers. 5580 dual, 5450 dual, 940, 920, 920 & 5335 dual, + 2 x 30" + Mac Mini (not rendering) + router & a few power packs etc. 2300 watts when rendering.

My 5580 is about 540 watts rendering, it's quite high compared to the other computers but watts per frame it's the most efficient. A lot better than the 5450 & which is stacks better than the 5335.

Remove any graphics cards from computers that are just nodes, they still consume power even if not being used.

Open a window or 2 to circulate air through the room. If I have to turn on the air-con that's another 1000 watts input, for tax the air-con will be on so to speak!

Attached a screen shot of our refrigerator power usage.

Danner
04-26-2012, 12:46 AM
The newer I7 processors are very energy efficient and thankfully, very quiet too.

Andy Meyer
04-26-2012, 05:31 AM
my render nodes burn about 130 watt for rendering.
only small mainboard with gpu on board or really low power gpu card, one ssd, 8gb ram, 2600k cpu with noctua cooling, 2 case fans... thats it. no screen, no usb devices, just one ethernet connection.
i use 350 watt enermax psu, this is overkill i know.
so my 12 nodes + network switch use about 1600 watt.

silviotoledo
04-26-2012, 06:45 AM
Summary:

Reported cases with different processors and machines ( on full load ? )

180 W
280 W
280 W
150 W
189 W
383 W
130 W

average: 228 W

228 W x 24 hours x 30 days/ 1000 = 164 Kw per computer per month

Good to know it does not consum all the source power. This will save a lot of energy.

tips:

The new i7 processor from intel saves a lot of energy
No GPU card and monitor required for CPU rendering.

Hieron
04-26-2012, 03:15 PM
228 W x 24 hours x 30 days/ 1000 = 164 Kw per computer per month


kWh.. not Kw

W(att) is a measure of power, kW is Watts/1000 (hence small k, big W), kWh(ours) is a measure of energy.

/end teachermode



The new i7 processor from intel saves a lot of energy
No GPU card and monitor required for CPU rendering.

No doubt about that, Sandy bridge was good in that regard too.

What are you planning btw, a new renderfarm? :)