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HolyMonkey-
04-16-2012, 12:21 AM
I have a repeating problem, rendering a frame can take upto 10 minutes, as soon as I bake radiosity and start rendering scene it takes around 10 minutes the first few attempts, then I leave my computer on overnight, and as soon as I come back it suddenly takes upto 25-30 minutes per frame. Completely unlogical, because there is nothing that would imply that particular frame to be heavier to render.

Does it have to do anthing with computers going into "sleep mode" if no one is messing around? Anyone had this same problem? It happens constantly, and it is EXTREMELY frustrating! hi ^^

"Edit"

I did an accurate test, again

It took 40 seconds to render 1 frame from a scene,

If I would be back tomorow it would probably say the same around 25-30 minutes pe frame. Also note that Lightwave was kinda "stuck" when I got back and it had to sort of refresh. Really slow.

Danner
04-16-2012, 12:31 AM
animated radiosity cache?

HolyMonkey-
04-16-2012, 12:51 AM
animated radiosity cache?

indeed

Greenlaw
04-16-2012, 02:08 AM
I'm not sure if this is what you're experiencing but depending on what's going on in your scene and what your cache settings are, the increasing times could be normal. In brief, your cache size progressively increases from frame to frame, thus gradually increasing your render time, and if you are caching every single frame, the cache may get quite huge towards the end of the scene.

I highly recommend reading the Lightwave 9.6 Radiosity Guide document by Except (http://www.except.nl/lightwave/RadiosityGuide96/index.htm) (still applicable to LW 10.1 and 11,) which explains in detail (and far better than I ever could,) what happens when you use the cache and how to optimize its use (and when not to use it.)

BTW, if you scroll to near the bottom of the page, you'll see a graphic example of what happens when you use Animated Cache, which probably explains the situation better than the text.

Hope this helps.

G.

HolyMonkey-
04-16-2012, 02:16 AM
I'm not sure if this is what you're experiencing but depending on what's going on in your scene and what your cache settings are, the increasing times could be normal. In brief, your cache size progressively increases from frame to frame, thus gradually increasing your render time, and if you are caching every single frame, the cache may get quite huge towards the end of the scene.

I highly recommend reading the Lightwave 9.6 Radiosity Guide document by Except (http://www.except.nl/lightwave/RadiosityGuide96/index.htm) (still applicable to LW 10.1 and 11,) which explains in detail (and far better than I ever could,) what happens when you use the cache and how to optimize its use (and when not to use it.)

BTW, if you scroll to near the bottom of the page, you'll see a graphic example of what happens when you use Animated Cache, which probably explains the situation better than the text.

Hope this helps.

G.


Thanks man I've read it before but I guess its time to refresh, but dont you have to leave animated radioisity on for the entire animation if you have moving objects? I'll have a read through thank you for your help. If you come up with more solutions, please dont hesitate to share.

JonW
04-16-2012, 02:33 AM
Have you tried Baking the Radiosity (Animated bakes the reference points) & then Locking the radiosity before you render the scene.


Depending on what you are rendering 30 minutes a frame is most likely very good. It also depends on what computer you are using.

3DGFXStudios
04-16-2012, 02:37 AM
If you have a lot of animation in your scene it's better to not use cache.

HolyMonkey-
04-16-2012, 03:01 AM
My scene is very simple so this shouldnt be taking long at all. I've noticed EACH frame it passes it takes 1 second longer.

Frame 10 took 15 seconds
Frame 11 took 16 seconds
frame 11 took 17 seconds
Frame 12 took 19 seconds. It kinda adds time to each and every frame.


"If you have a lot of animation in your scene it's better to not use cache. "
How do you avoid flickering then D:?

JonW: What I do is I bake the scene down into the cache, and put it to locked then render it.

3DGFXStudios
04-16-2012, 03:10 AM
To avoid flickering you need to set the rpe higher. In most cases between 1000 and 3000 rpe gives you good results. for sbr is between 20 and 250. But it all depends on your scene lighting and models. That every frame takes more time when using cache is normal.

HolyMonkey-
04-16-2012, 03:33 AM
To avoid flickering you need to set the rpe higher. In most cases between 1000 and 3000 rpe gives you good results. for sbr is between 20 and 250. But it all depends on your scene lighting and models. That every frame takes more time when using cache is normal.

I thought cache was a time saver!!!!

Gosh, it all makes sense now. Thanks man!

JonW
04-16-2012, 03:35 AM
Another option is to use low RPE settings & do 6 or more motion blur passes. This is going to take time but it will get rid of the flicker.

HolyMonkey-
04-16-2012, 04:18 AM
Another option is to use low RPE settings & do 6 or more motion blur passes. This is going to take time but it will get rid of the flicker.

hmm What methods do ou usually guys use in different scenario? I always tend to go with caching but oh boy not anymore! hehe