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lertola2
03-30-2012, 06:41 AM
I have a new Dell pc that is giving me a message that lighwave has crashed. This error happens after hours of processing. So it usually crashes sometimes over night. Last week it was crashing while doing an fprime render in 9.6. Last night I got the same error when running a large bullet simulation in lightwave 11. I tried looking in the generated crash report with notepad but it seems like it is not a text file.

I am very new to using PCs as I have had macs up to this point so I do not know what to try or how to trouble shoot this problem. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,
-Joe

http://forums.newtek.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=103060&stc=1&d=1333110586

RebelHill
03-30-2012, 07:17 AM
Overheating/badly tuned hardware.

Ive seen this before when doing overclocking... push the clock speed up high enough, and intensive tasks, like LW rendering, crash. As u push it higher the whole OS starts to bottom out.

If ur box has been overclocked as standard, then its that... if not, then its just been shoddily built.

BigHache
03-30-2012, 07:18 AM
One thing you can try based on your description is to see the system crashes on a long process from another app. Prime95 (http://www.mersenne.org/freesoft/), run a stress test on the CPU. Let it run overnight and see if it generates the same error or if it may give other clues. A possibility, if this is a multi-core system, is that one of the cores is crashing. You will have limited BIOS options, one of the reasons I lean away from off-the-shelf PCs, but if Prime95 shows you that a core fails you could try to disable it in the BIOS. If that's not the case, there's always the possibility that removing the config files could repair this.

Another option would be to run a stress test on the RAM with Memtest86+ (http://www.memtest.org/). In any case, that would be a good idea to do to make sure you didn't get sold faulty RAM. The good thing about off-the-shelf is warranty. The bad thing is Dell would probably have you ship the entire system back to them and not just the RAM.

Option Tres: Overheating. I don't think it's as likely, but there's a possibility it's overheating. Off-the-shelf PC cases don't tend to have as good airflow as some options for enthusiast cases. HWMonitor (http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor/versions-history.html) can help you watch temps as you render/process.

I second what RH said on overclocking.

That should get you started. Let us know what you find.

littlewaves
03-30-2012, 09:28 AM
Overheating/badly tuned hardware.

Ive seen this before when doing overclocking... push the clock speed up high enough, and intensive tasks, like LW rendering, crash. As u push it higher the whole OS starts to bottom out.

If ur box has been overclocked as standard, then its that... if not, then its just been shoddily built.


Is overclocking generally not a great idea then for machines used to do a lot of rendering or can it be done safely?

I ask because I too am about to switch from Mac to PC purely for Lightwave purposes.

BigHache
03-30-2012, 09:59 AM
Is overclocking generally not a great idea then for machines used to do a lot of rendering or can it be done safely?

I ask because I too am about to switch from Mac to PC purely for Lightwave purposes.

OC'ing at all will begin to decrease system stability. A small OC may not show instability but then wouldn't even be worth doing. Also some CPUs don't OC well, so you wouldn't be able to get much more headroom if you wanted. It's generally recommended to use any given system to make sure it's fully working, stress test it, etc., then OC if you want to get into that.