PDA

View Full Version : Real-time reflection



humbas
03-14-2012, 11:40 AM
Hi there,

I work at a new TV channel in Brazil and I'm awfully new to this virtual set management thing, so please forgive me if my doubt seems foolish.
We're currently creating original sets to be used on Tricaster with Cinema 4D, but we're having a hard time applying a reflective surface such as the one found in the sample set "Prime Time" that is provided with the Tricaster VSE package.
The anchor's desk on this set has real-time reflection and makes the set look more real than it is.
Does anyone know how to do it? Is it possible only using Lightwave?

Thank you all in advance.

Humberto

Tricaster 850
Sony HDV 270U

jmmultex
03-14-2012, 12:51 PM
For HD, the only ways to create that type of set yourself would be to use VSE to modify an existing set (I don't believe the photoshop layered sets have real time reflections) or to sign up for the virtual set development kit from Newtek that would allow you to develop your own sets with Lightwave.

Another alternative might be to contact someone that could build the set for you. I would recommend contacting Jose Burgos (joseburgos) here on this board - he is a well respected liveset developer that could certainly help you.

Best
john

SBowie
03-14-2012, 01:57 PM
(I don't believe the photoshop layered sets have real time reflections)The basic approach to reflections is to make the reflection UV layer, distort it, erase bits, etc., to fit - but don't reduce the opacity of the UV map. Instead, add another (floor or desk, for example) layer above, and reduce its opacity, partially revealing the reflection layer.

(A PSD example that ships with VSE demonstrates this approach.)

jmmultex
03-14-2012, 02:13 PM
My apologies for the misstatement, Steve. I gladly stand corrected - that is an excellent element of VSE that I wasn't aware of. I'll have to play around with the Photoshop side of things a bit more now.

-john

SBowie
03-14-2012, 04:09 PM
My apologies for the misstatement, Steve. I gladly stand corrected - that is an excellent element of VSE that I wasn't aware of. I'll have to play around with the Photoshop side of things a bit more now.No worries, John - I had it wrong too, but it helps when your desk is 15' from the desk of the guy who makes them for Newtek. ;)

joseburgos
03-14-2012, 04:12 PM
A little bit back (well a long time back actually) I posted an example of this and if you understand what Steve wrote, the image in my post will help give a visual to this concept;
http://forums.newtek.com/showpost.php?p=783987&postcount=3


Take care,

humbas
03-15-2012, 08:56 AM
Thank you all for helping.

I'll let you know as soon as I get there!

Humberto

Eric Pratt
03-16-2012, 09:44 AM
This is an example from our formats page showing all the layers and how they go together for our Virtual Set Editor version:
http://www.virtualsetworks.com/formats.htm#TCXDVSE
The reflection on the desk is faint (Because there is an alpha channel applied to it, but if you look closely below the UV map you can see the reflected part.
This reflection was done in Lightwave, but that's only to manage the volume of the sets we do, it could easily be done by hand if it's a one off scenario

jmmultex
03-16-2012, 11:04 AM
Eric, Jose

Thanks for the illustrations - very useful...

-john