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Barnard
02-18-2012, 10:27 AM
Can a Windows and Mac work together for Lightwave network rendering? Also can LWO and LWS files be traded between both platforms. I've never had a Mac before, but hear that they are more practical for animation, and was considering getting one for this purpose. But most of my work was done on a Windows.

nickdigital
02-18-2012, 01:50 PM
I've never had a Mac before, but hear that they are more practical for animation, and was considering getting one for this purpose. But most of my work was done on a Windows.

I'm not sure how a Mac is more practical for animation. If anything a pc would be better as there are more plug-ins that are available for the pc.

JonW
02-18-2012, 02:45 PM
Scenes & objects can be used on both.

I do everything on a Mac other than LW. You just need as much CPU resources as you can afford & this is easier with a PC. You can easily build Bare bones boxes for rendering nodes to get a much better GHz/dollar ratio.


A few other issues:
You may want to read up a bit on Mac 10.8
I will be stuck on 10.6 because 10.7 will not support my old software.

dwburman
02-19-2012, 03:38 PM
If you want to network render with both a Mac and PC you'll need a 3rd party render controller.

I have a Mac and a PC. You could always install Windows on the Mac for when you want to network render.

Sometimes I render up on one machine (frames 1 to 60 with a step of 1) and down on the other (frames 60 to 1 with a step of -1)

Barnard
02-21-2012, 02:40 PM
I would only need the Mac for rendering as my current windows has no problem with modelling. But it's just so slow rendering complex scenes with advanced surface and lighting properties. Would installing windows on a Mac weaken the hardware's performance. With the compatibility issue recently mentioned, maybe it would be more efficient to take JonW's advice and invest in a windows desktop with plenty of room for upgrade components.

What's the highest specs that I can get in this modern time for about 4 to 7 thousand dollars (Windows Desktop and upgrades)?

nickdigital
02-21-2012, 02:49 PM
I would only need the Mac for rendering as my current windows has no problem with modelling. ?

This sounds like the more expensive route just to build a render farm. You get more bang for your buck with PCs.

Danner
02-21-2012, 03:31 PM
What's the highest specs that I can get in this modern time for about 4 to 7 thousand dollars (Windows Desktop and upgrades)?

For 7 grand you can get 4 monster rendering machines.

My .02 c stay away from the very top of the line, you get 7% extra speed for twice the money compared to a near top of the line system. Unless you find a bargain I don't recommend Xeon based systems, the speed is nice but not worth the extra price. Also I hate how noisy the are (were? newer ones might be better at this, Intel is finally shipping some nice heat sink fans on some processors).

Stay away from Quadro and FireGL cards. They are way too expensive and LW doesn't benefit much from them, instead, get a relatively fast gamer card, preferably Nvidia. Again stay away from the top of the line.

If you want modeling and interface speed, look for the highest core speed (usually ghz dependant) for best rendering get as many cores as you can.

There are some true hardware geeks in this forum, maybe they'll chime in.

GL

dwburman
02-24-2012, 05:57 PM
On installing windows on a Mac:

There shouldn't be a performance hit by installing Windows on your Mac (as long as you boot into Windows instead of running it on top of Mac OS using Parallels, etc). In fact, you might find that some software/tasks run faster under Windows. I vaguely remember hearing something about that.

My recent computer purchase:

There are a few websites that compare benchmarks for various CPUs. When I was putting together my budget workstation a few months ago, I looked at how the various CPUs scored on Cinebench since that's a 3D raytracer, and most relevant for what I planned on doing with the computer. I ended up spending around $700 on my box (including the OS - but not including mouse, keyboard, case, monitors and optical drive and a few assorted cables). It's not the monster workstation I wanted, but it is 2x to 3x faster than the first gen MacPro sitting on my desk. If it were just a rendering box (which it may be in the future), I wouldn't have bothered putting the $80 graphics card in it.

FWIW the specs are:
3.4GHz quad-core i7 2600* CPU | 16GB RAM | nVidia GeForce GT 440 | Windows 7 Home Premium**

Hopefully, I'll be able to put together a proper workstation with better specs and demote this machine to rendering only, but I needed more rendering power sooner rather than later and cheaper rather than expensive.

*The 2600k wasn't a lot more expensive, but I was not planning on overclocking the CPU.
** If you have multiple physical CPUs, you'd need Win7 Professional or ultimate, but I didn't see any features in Professional to make me want to spend the extra $$

JeffrySG
02-24-2012, 10:15 PM
but hear that they are more practical for animation, and was considering getting one for this purpose.

if anything I've ny heard the opposite. Where did you hear that? I'm a Mac user too btw. Just stick to win if that's what you use already.