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erikals
01-12-2012, 01:16 PM
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xkcsm0WG7v8
http://infohigh.server.ne.jp/temp/imodela_fig_blt

$1000  (note, it is not a 3Dprinter, so doesn't have those capabilities, iModela is a CNC router)

 

biliousfrog
01-13-2012, 07:22 AM
Several years ago I would have been really excited by it but now I just see it as an expensive way to produce something that would be quicker to make by hand. Given the option of buying the iModela for $1000 or getting a model 3D printed for $1000, I'd get it printed...or better yet, buy a 3D Printer for $1300.

cresshead
01-13-2012, 12:19 PM
Several years ago I would have been really excited by it but now I just see it as an expensive way to produce something that would be quicker to make by hand. Given the option of buying the iModela for $1000 or getting a model 3D printed for $1000, I'd get it printed...or better yet, buy a 3D Printer for $1300.

$1300 3d printer?
linky please!:thumbsup:

gristle
01-13-2012, 12:31 PM
He is probably refering to the Makerbot or one of the other similar machines. These are either full kit, or some parts + you making the others.

http://www.makerbot.com/

Difference is they are FDM machines, basically the head extrudes plastic, whereas the Roland can cut various materials.

cresshead
01-13-2012, 12:54 PM
http://store.makerbot.com/replicator-404.html

this looks pretty cool at $1999 for a dual extrusion option and it's pre built...not a kit.


http://store.makerbot.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/t/h/thereplicator_with_prints_small_1.jpg

erikals
01-13-2012, 05:08 PM
what's special about iModela is it's resolution, the resolution is superior compared to a 3D printer...

the material cost is also less afaik, as a 3D printer needs a spool, a spool cost $50 for just one...


but most of all, check the resolution

 

erikals
01-13-2012, 05:16 PM
for 3D print, i found PrintBot interesting...

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/printrbot/printrbot-your-first-3d-printer?ref=card
starts at $424

 

cresshead
01-13-2012, 07:33 PM
what's special about iModela is it's resolution, the resolution is superior compared to a 3D printer...

the material cost is also less afaik, as a 3D printer needs a spool, a spool cost $50 for just one...


but most of all, check the resolution



yeh the 3d printer results are course [rough] in comparison but their tool volume is huge...the idea of CNC means many types of material can be used.

intersting and good to keep an eye one..also Roland have been in the print biz for years...early 70's so you can trust that they're stuff is good quality and their synth arm means they can w rite good software too.

JonW
01-13-2012, 09:03 PM
Over a decade ago I looked at a 3d mill for architectural models. Price about $50k - $100k. Decided against it mainly because we would have to redraw all the architectural drawings in 3d so they would work. We felt that for all these one off jobs is was still better to build by hand.

I did have a look at one in use (1.2 x 1.2m cutting table), you really need to have a dedicated space for it due to all the mess.


Give it a few years & you will be able to buy your Brandname9000 at your stationery supplier for a few hundred dollars.

Matt
01-13-2012, 10:25 PM
iWhy iDoes iEvery iProduct iThese iDays iHave iTo iStart iWith iI?

It's getting old!

erikals
01-14-2012, 12:18 AM
...whi indiid

U is next...

JonW
01-14-2012, 12:32 AM
& will be machined from a solid block of unobtainium!

biliousfrog
01-14-2012, 03:09 AM
what's special about iModela is it's resolution, the resolution is superior compared to a 3D printer...

the material cost is also less afaik, as a 3D printer needs a spool, a spool cost $50 for just one...


but most of all, check the resolution



The CNC bit is 1.6mm so, although the resolution can be higher for smooth surfaces, you can't have any spaces smaller than 1.6mm. Compare that to 3D print which is often measured in micrometers.

It's also just a 2 axis machine to it's use will be limited.

It seems ok, it's cheap enough, but I'd still prefer to buy a decent print than work within the constraints of a milling machine. I guess, for small scale prototypes of certain, simple shapes it will be ideal.

erikals
01-14-2012, 04:12 AM
3Dprinters do have better accuracy, but only the Pro ones, and not these cheap ones.

(as far as i know)