PDA

View Full Version : Video production questions



skywalker113
01-11-2012, 12:56 PM
I'm going through alot of decision making on how to start a video production business. I know i've already made a couple threads already but theres alot to ask.

One thing thats really bugging me is what happens if I put 800.00 dollors worth of time into a video someone wants, and then they want revisions? Should I charge extra for the revisions? What if they ask for even more revisions? Am I going to end up earning less money for my time the more into the project I get?

Im also thinking of selling commercial presets online for a fixed price. Would that be a more easier and non stressful way of working?

thanks
Luke

Dexter2999
01-11-2012, 01:12 PM
The issue of revisions should be in your initial agreement.

In the agreement I used to use I differentiated between "minor" and "major" revisions by the number of hours required to make the changes.

It is important in the process to keep constant communication with the client on this point. They okay the storyboards and artwork. You do a previs and they need to approve it. Then the final animation is done.

If the client makes changes in the phases prior to the final it was most often a "minor" change in that it didn't require extensive effort to correct/change.

"Major" changes require a "change order" with additional hours to be billed. I NEVER agree to deals that allow for flat rates and radical non-billable changes. It only opens the door for abuse.

Flat rate is "off the shelf", you get what you get.

Many other people don't feel or work that way because they have a high desire to please the client believe they will get return business. But this type of client isn't really someone I want return business from...or to deal with in the first place.

As for the issue about what you have invested, that is why you take 1/3 up front,1/3 on commencment of principal photography (or when you start the final render process after the client has approved all pre-vis and artwork), and 1/3 on delivery of the final product.

At least that is how I did business...then again I was pretty stict and got out of the business because the clients I was attracting apparently couldn't afford to do business that way.

Nangleator
01-11-2012, 01:15 PM
...and if you don't think a client can abuse flat rates, just do a job for someone for free, and see if you're ever done with the tweaks!

Dexter2999
01-11-2012, 01:17 PM
...and if you don't think a client can abuse flat rates, just do a job for someone for free, and see if you're ever done with the tweaks!

LOL, I did a couple of jobs for friends with no money. Rather than do it for a lowball amount (that I told them would very probably insult me), I did the job for free for a friend.

But the stipulation was, all complaints and critiques had to be submitted in the "notes" section of the check they fill out to pay my full rate.

SBowie
01-11-2012, 01:36 PM
But the stipulation was, all complaints and critiques had to be submitted in the "notes" section of the check they fill out to pay my full rate.That's useful. My own policy went along the lines of "This is my job, and the way I make my living. There are no 'Friends and Family' discounts. If you can't afford the work, I might consider taking it on as charity, time permitting. Otherwise, if you can afford it, surely you don't expect me to take time off from my work to do you a favour?"