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lipera
10-17-2003, 07:37 PM
What settings should be set in VT3 if your DV footage was shot in 16:9,(settings for both input and output)? thanks, Bill LiPera

stevan
10-19-2003, 10:32 PM
We do all of our programming in 16:9 format. Our Hitachi Z-3000W cameras are switchable to the wide screen format, and our fourth camera (a Panasonic AG DVX100) has an anamorphic lens which squeezes a 16:9 image onto a 4:3 chip. I make no changes to any settings other than setting my VT Vision monitors to 16:9 proportion. (Right click on the VT Vision monitor and select "use 16:9 hieght".)

Now, if your DV footage comes in already letterboxed in a 4:3 frame, then no settings changes are needed, just use the standard VT Vision settings.

If you have true 16:9 input (tall, skinny people on a 4:3 display) and want letterboxed output, just set the vertical size of each clip to 365 lines instead of the default 486 lines. That reduction to 75% of the original height will restore normal proportions to your subjects and create the familiar black bands on the top and bottom of the screen.

We actually bought a hardware device from Miranda which does the letterboxing separately on a VT composite output. That way we can output a live switching session lettterboxed to monitors and tv sets throughout the building.

I hope I have captured the essence of your question and provided some helpful information.

Steve

lipera
10-20-2003, 10:54 AM
Thanks, that was very helpful. Bill LiPera

djlithium
10-20-2003, 10:17 PM
Err....
Actually...
When you are pulling your material in, there is an option in the capture panel next to the video compression options that when you select DV video will allow you to write the 16:9 flag into the video file. This will ensure when you pull it out and into another application like AE or After Effects that things are indeed 16:9.
So far it seems this is only available when you recording from an analog source and making a new DV or DVCAM file in an AVI.
If you pull in from straight DV, do your cut, then wrap your project in the ToasterAVI format and pull it into another application for the final lay out in 16:9. DON'T DO IT ON THE TIME LINE IN VT-EDIT using a resize unless you are letterboxing it.

I do a lot of the finishing work for 16:9 edits in virtual dub which has specific tools for pixel aspect ratios and cropping as well as true letter boxing.

Do a search for virtual dub on google and you will eventually find links to download it from the source forge page. Yup, its very free.

Hope that helps.

Cheers.

bradl
10-21-2003, 12:24 AM
Originally posted by stevan
I make no changes to any settings other than setting my VT Vision monitors to 16:9 proportion. (Right click on the VT Vision monitor and select "use 16:9 hieght".) ...

... If you have true 16:9 input (tall, skinny people on a 4:3 display) and want letterboxed output, just set the vertical size of each clip to 365 lines instead of the default 486 lines.

Steve,

Not having done this I am curious. If you reduce your anamorphic footage vertically as descibed above, why would you set your VT Vision monitor to 16:9? Wouldn't that double squeeze it for Vision Display (or does it just crop the extra, don't remember)?

Now if you use the Miranda externally, I could see the need for VT Vision 16:9 if you internally work with the anamorphic footage.

stevan
10-21-2003, 06:03 AM
dj,

Thanks for the info on the 16:9 flag. I knew it existed, but I wasn't aware how to place/access it. What form does it take as a part of the video or digital signal? Also, thanks for the tip on virtual dub. I will look for it and check it out.

brad,
Sorry, but I guess I did give the impression of using 16:9 format TVision monitors to view letterboxed video. The effect would be exactly as you describe. I do use them for acquiring and editing my source material, and when outputting through my external Miranda hardware, but if I letterbox within the T[3], I do view the result on 4:3 configured monitors as the final viewer would. Reducing the vertical height does squeeze, rather than crop, the original image.

Thanks to both of you. As you can see, I'm still learning. This is a great forum.

Steve