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wtdedula
12-15-2011, 05:24 AM
Hello All;
In all of the tutorials I've viewed, they always use backdrop images to guide the modeling process.

I am curious if you all use Backdrop images or if it's possible to look at a photo instead (As with the Mars Rover design attached where 3-view drawings aren't available) ?

Also, I'm curious if any of you have any unique ways of creating backdrop images or visualizing a model if drawings aren't available ? Thanks.

Tim

Danner
12-15-2011, 07:52 AM
It might be an obvious technique to most, but I often have to use reference images of objects that are in perspective, so I take the image into photoshop and use the crop tool with perspective ticked on, then align the corners to match one side, then apply the crop.

nickdigital
12-15-2011, 12:51 PM
Also, I'm curious if any of you have any unique ways of creating backdrop images or visualizing a model if drawings aren't available ? Thanks.


Break out the pencil, fire up the imagination and fill in the details yourself. :D

lertola2
12-17-2011, 12:24 PM
It might be an obvious technique to most, but I often have to use reference images of objects that are in perspective, so I take the image into photoshop and use the crop tool with perspective ticked on, then align the corners to match one side, then apply the crop.


I am a long time Photoshop user and I have always used the transform tool to do this. I did not know about the perspective in the crop tool.

Thanks,
-Joe

Danner
12-17-2011, 01:48 PM
Good to know it helped. Sometimes it's easier to make things match even better if you do a lens correction on the image before cropping. Specially if your photos were taken with a wide angle lens.

Surrealist.
12-17-2011, 07:47 PM
The first thing I do is an exhaustive search for all the reference material I can find. I remember one model airplane I had to model, I was missing the profile angle. It is not unusual for me to sift through a 50 to 100 page thread on an enthusiast website where they share images of model airplanes they are building and flying. Someplace in one of those threads a guy had snapped a photo of the thing when it was flying by. A perfect profile almost straight on! A little rotation in PS, done.

The next thing I do is assemble all of the references I have in PS. Starting with the orthographic views I size everything up and make myself a front side and top view. For the ortho angles that I am missing I use the best references I have in perspective and use whatever tools I have to in PS to approximate where it should line up based on the references I do have. The warp tool can come in handy here.

I have my photo references separated in to folders. One for the other views I layout in PS and one for all the misc photo references I have dug up with Google.

When I model I use the orthos for BG. Then as many perspective angles as I can get for the particular part of the model I am focusing on I put in preview windows ready to cycle through as I need to and display them on my second monitor.

When I am done with that part of the model I load up another set of previews for the next part. For me it is always a process of going from the ortho views as my main source and the perspective views for a sense of how it is supposed to look in 3D to work out the volume.

There is a certain skill to using perspective views. And if that is all you have that is all you have. I would just try and get as many references as I could regardless. That to me is the basic key. From there it is a matter of knowing where to look and not giving up until you have looked exhaustively for the needed views. You can never have too many references.