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ShadowMystic
11-30-2011, 11:39 PM
I am looking at a new rig set up and I'm wondering about overclocking. I've always been in the belief that gaming was for overclocking but not workstations. Stability of my serious work is tantamount to a few extra hundred megahertz.

So I ask, is there really no difference from Intel's standard 2600 to its 2600k besides its unlocked multiplier and speed?
Has anyone used an overclocked CPU for professional benefit?

JCG
12-01-2011, 02:18 AM
I imagine you wouldn't be using the integrated graphics or virtualization, so it seems that the overclocking would be the only real difference left.

Here are the differences between the Intel® Core™ i7-2600 and the Intel Core i7-2600K:

Intel Core i7-2600
-TXT (Trusted Execution Technology) a business level virus protection feature.
-VT-d (Virtualization with Directed I/O)
-Intel HD 2000 Graphics

Intel Core i7-2600K
-Unlocked multiplier (allows overclocking)
-Intel HD 3000 graphics (Improved graphics)
Unless you are using TXT or VT-d the value of the unlocked multiplier gives the Intel Core i7-2600K a very nice advantage over the Intel Core i7-2600.

Christian Wood
Intel Enthusiast Team

kopperdrake
12-01-2011, 03:08 AM
My everyday workhorse is currently an i7-2600K 3.4Ghz, but with the Asus P8P67 board allows me to set the 'turbo' button on bootup and overclocks automatically. I believe it's about a 500Mhz boost, which helps, and I've seen realtime benefits when rendering, but the PC remains stable. I imagine with a better cooling system I could manually overclock it more, but I'm quite happy with this muppet's version of overclocking. Seriously, for the price difference I'd go with the K and get a bit extra, but check out the Asus boards - they're pretty sweet and not bad money for what you get, imho.

ShadowMystic
12-01-2011, 07:26 AM
My everyday workhorse is currently an i7-2600K 3.4Ghz, but with the Asus P8P67 board allows me to set the 'turbo' button on bootup and overclocks automatically. I believe it's about a 500Mhz boost, which helps, and I've seen realtime benefits when rendering, but the PC remains stable. I imagine with a better cooling system I could manually overclock it more, but I'm quite happy with this muppet's version of overclocking. Seriously, for the price difference I'd go with the K and get a bit extra, but check out the Asus boards - they're pretty sweet and not bad money for what you get, imho.

I guess for twenty bucks more I should just go for the 2600k and I'm starting to believe the 2700k isn't anywhere near worth the next step up.
This is what I was looking at-
2600k now.http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115070
EVGA mobohttp://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813188097

Depending on how things go I may just wait for Ivy Bridge. Originally just intended to upgrade mobo, cpu, and ram then realized the jump to a brand new PC wasn't far off. Then, I wouldn't have a motherboard CPU set sitting uselessly packed away when render time came.

biliousfrog
12-01-2011, 07:57 AM
My i7 920 was overclocked to 4.2ghz (2.66ghz native) using a Corsair H20 cooler with 6gb RAM, it was not uncommon for people with 12gb RAM to get 3.8ghz stable with the same cooler or a Noctua fan cooler.

I eventually had to drop it back to stock speeds because of some weird stability issues which I never could work out. It would do very CPU intensive tasks, such as rendering, with no problems at all but occassionally, while doing something simple like watching a video on Youtube, the system would just reboot. I used the workstation purely as a render node while overclocked for 5 weeks to ensure stability, rendering almost 24/7 at 100% CPU load with very low temperatures and it certainly made a big difference to render speeds.

ShadowMystic
12-01-2011, 11:11 AM
My i7 920 was overclocked to 4.2ghz (2.66ghz native) using a Corsair H20 cooler with 6gb RAM, it was not uncommon for people with 12gb RAM to get 3.8ghz stable with the same cooler or a Noctua fan cooler.

I eventually had to drop it back to stock speeds because of some weird stability issues which I never could work out. It would do very CPU intensive tasks, such as rendering, with no problems at all but occassionally, while doing something simple like watching a video on Youtube, the system would just reboot. I used the workstation purely as a render node while overclocked for 5 weeks to ensure stability, rendering almost 24/7 at 100% CPU load with very low temperatures and it certainly made a big difference to render speeds.

I'm going with 16GB of RAM so that another issue I worry about. With larger sets of RAM, stability can be very iffy at times.

Danner
12-01-2011, 01:41 PM
To do overclocking correctly you need a good cooler and doing a lot of reading to get the right settings. There is no magic formula since every system is different, you need to know how much voltage you need and tweak the memory speed correctly and a few other things that are different depending on you motherboard. If you are lucky someone has found good settings on a similar machine.

OC'ing is not for everyone, but if you put in the time you can safely get a 20% increase in speed that would mean big savings if you compared it to getting a processor that was that fast. I enjoy tweaking my systems but I usually settle for around 10% speed increase just to be safe.