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skywalker113
09-12-2011, 05:12 PM
I would like to start a business like LucasArts or Blizzard, and make films, movies, and video games. We could also provide animation for other companies.

I know of a couple friends from highschool that took animation. Although, they dont know very much. I was thinking of enrolling in a game design course in collage in order to find some programmers who might help with games. I have not found any 3d animation courses in any colleges around me.

some advice would help:)

nickdigital
09-12-2011, 05:40 PM
What you're proposing is no small task. Instead of trying to compete with Blizzard and ILM I would suggest getting good at what you are passionate about and focusing on that. Companies like Blizzard and ILM have a large pool of resources that they can draw upon (talent, capital and reputation).

If you and your friends are into games then focus on making games that you guys can publish successfully. If you already recognize that you and your friends have a ways to go in just learning the field, then starting a company is probably premature at this point.

Find what you're passionate about, focus on that and you'll be successful.

Good luck.

D.S.W.
09-12-2011, 05:56 PM
Find what you're passionate about, focus on that and you'll be successful.

Good luck.

:i_agree: and :goodluck: too.

OnlineRender
09-12-2011, 07:15 PM
I have not found any 3d animation courses in any colleges around me.

some advice would help:)

that line right there is what you need to do .................

speismonqui
09-12-2011, 08:04 PM
I would like to start a business like LucasArts or Blizzard, and make films, movies, and video games. We could also provide animation for other companies.


Are you a "Secret Millionaire"? :D

JeffrySG
09-12-2011, 08:43 PM
I would like to start a business like LucasArts or Blizzard, and make films, movies, and video games. We could also provide animation for other companies.

I know of a couple friends from highschool that took animation. Although, they dont know very much. I was thinking of enrolling in a game design course in collage in order to find some programmers who might help with games. I have not found any 3d animation courses in any colleges around me.

some advice would help:)

Are you asking advice on how to get the technical knowledge to be able to create games from a creative side? or are you asking how to go about starting a company to create games? Two very different things.

Either way you might want to start with your friends trying to build some maps for an existing game or some in game models - and then eventually a full game mod. Also, there are a ton of different types of games out there. And they all require different skills, etc.

roboman
09-13-2011, 12:34 AM
I would like to start a business like LucasArts or Blizzard, and make films, movies, and video games....some advice would help:)

The tv ads sure do make that sort of thing look fun.
Step one: just start doing it. Do stuff you just post to youtube. No body is going to pay for your early stuff. You might even want to post it with a handle you can loose later....

Step two: Look for any thing you can that will teach you what you need to know and start looking for a real school ( http://forums.newtek.com/showthread.php?t=122113&highlight=arts) and a way to go.

Step three: Keep working on as many of your own projects as you can while going to school ( for the most part you don't want to put school projects on your demo reel... )

Step four: You get offered a job, get offered money to do enough projects on your own or you graduate. If you graduate, look for a job and keep doing side jobs / projects. At some point it will likely seem reasonable to strike out on your own or you will decide you like letting others handle the not fun parts of running a business. If you are really good and lucky, things will take off before you graduate.

Some people have just worked like mad on their own and managed to start a business after a few years or started off doing simple things like business cards and worked the business up as their skills improved. There use to be less animators / 3D people and the economy was booming. That is probably harder to do now.

Running your own business is very hard. Takes huge amounts of work to start and build. Most fail. Most, that don't fail, simply provide a living. A small number become icons. If it's something you are driven towards, having your own business is the best thing in the world. If you think it's an easy way to get rich you are very likely going to go out of business quickly.

Have fun and good luck.

skywalker113
09-13-2011, 01:33 AM
Well im definitely not trying to compete with large busineses like pixar. Im looking to build a small buisness. Theres alot of ideas that I want to do, but dont want to take on 100% of the work. (unwrapping every object, programming every task). Starting with a group of 3-5 people and build from there. Im out of highschool now, so I have enough time to work on it.

pauland
09-13-2011, 01:35 AM
I was thinking of enrolling in a game design course in collage

I've heard the results can be a bit patchy.. ;-)

Dexter2999
09-13-2011, 01:51 AM
It is good to dream big (especially while you are young) but look at maybe starting smaller and working your way up.

Look at a smaller game for something like the app store. The right game could make you tons of money that would allow you to grow into something that could take on the bigger projects you may be dreaming of (like HALO or somesuch.) Even if you got a a third of the success of ANGRY BIRDS that is still a staggering amount of money. That kind of revenue could serve as "seed money" to buy you seats of some top game engines in which to build your more advanced games.

eagleeyed
09-13-2011, 02:22 AM
And remember, if your first project is not a success just keep on trying and don't give up.

Remember reading an interview about Angry Birds, they had made tons of games before they hit the moneyload that is Angry Birds.


Angry Birds came to be by a very analytical approach. Rovio has been in the business of mobile games since 2003 and has made 50+ games before Angry Birds, most of them work for hire for people like EA, GameHouse, Nokia etc. So the team knows how to make games, for example Bounce for Nokia has been installed on 250M+ devices. The team that created Angry Birds was 12 people, now Rovio is 50 people, quite a change in 12 months.

http://technmarketing.com/2010/12/peter-vesterbacka-maker-of-angry-birds-talks-about-the-birds-apple-android-nokia-and-palmhp/

Portnoy
09-13-2011, 11:38 AM
Defintely no small task but I agree with the others. Find something you love to do, start small and work your way from there. Trying to do the same thing myself. Much success!!

Larry_g1s
09-13-2011, 12:08 PM
I have not found any 3d animation courses in any colleges around me.

some advice would help:)I'm currently enrolled on-line at ianimate.net (http://www.ianimate.net). It's all live and online, basically eliminating the "around me" issue.

Shabazzy
09-13-2011, 04:01 PM
Lesson 1

There are two parts to all businesses.

Part 1
Providing a service or making a product.

Part 2
Running a business.

The two are very much connected. One cannot live without the other (for very long at least)

The two are very different disciplines and use very different skills. Both are required and very necessary for all businesses to flourish and succeed.

Lesson 2

Part 2 is more often than not overlooked by a LOT of people who want to start a business. Without question they always fail to survive if they don't acknowledge it's importance.

Lesson 3

If you're going to head the business, then focus on Part 2. You will have a better chance of surviving in the marketplace if you understand how businesses relate to each other, how to network, how to make deals, how to market your business, how to develop your business through acquisitions, how to handle the finances, how to re-invest profits, how to raise revenues, understanding and knowing what the customers want (a la Steve Jobs), the list goes on.

Lesson 4

If all you know is how to make a game, then you'll be dead in the water in the world of business.

Knowing and focusing on Part 1 is really irrelevant to business.

Lesson 5

Knowing Part 2 is where success lies because knowing the art of business means you can take ANY product or service and make money from it. But knowing only Part 1 will bring you nothing.

Lesson 6

For Part 1, hire people to handle that side of things. They are a dime a dozen, so you'll never have to worry about running out of a labour-force to make your product or service.

Lesson 7

But by taking charge of Part 2, you'll have complete control over what happens to your business and your employees will have complete faith in you if you show them you know how to run a good, effective and well managed business.

Conclusion

Find a good business school or gain some work experience. It'll pay dividends in the end.

Here endeth the lesson.

Shabazzy

OnlineRender
09-13-2011, 04:04 PM
LESSON 8 : Don't go into the media industry if you want to be RICH............

Shabazzy
09-13-2011, 04:05 PM
LESSON 8 : Don't go into the media industry if you want to make money.........

LOL! I forgot that one. :)

speismonqui
09-13-2011, 05:39 PM
found this, I think you'll like it:

http://www.g4tv.com/videos/55155/how-to-get-a-job-in-videogames-the-doctors-from-bioware/

LW_Will
09-13-2011, 07:04 PM
skywalker113, I think that the general opinion of the room is that you can't do your idea. You can't go out, with some friends, some ideas and turn that into a business. Can't be done, unless you are very old, like 40, after years of "paying your dues."

I agree with them. Can't be done.

But, my advice to you is to do it. Take your friends, get a really really GOOD story and make it. And turn the money you make, not into flash cars or some cool babes, but into more computers, more people. Invest in your future. And do it again, and again, and again... then you can buy some toys. ;-)

See, part of the problem is that a lot of the guys here (sorry guys) would LOVE to make their OWN animation house. Turn it into ILM, Pixar and DD combined. But, they don't.

Know why?

A dozen reasons really, but one of the most important is that they know what they can do. They know that this idea won't work. It can't. Companies are going out of business every day. You simply can't do this.

Simply put, the know their limitations.

But, dear skywalker113, my youngling... you do not. You are young. A bit of a rebel, a bit of a dreamer. You are among those strange few that might, MIGHT make it.

I know you came here asking for advice, but my advice is don't ask for advice on whether this will work or not.

Ask for advice to actually DO IT.

I'll help. Add my advice, if you like. Just go, and do. (remember, there is no "try".)

Break a leg, kid.

Shabazzy
09-13-2011, 07:15 PM
Can't be done, unless you are very old, like 40,

I bake your pudding?!

Ex-squeeze me?!

I absolutely and resolutely resent the notion that 40 is VERY OLD!

Bl00dy cheek.

skywalker113
09-13-2011, 10:34 PM
Hey everyone, thanks for all of the feedback.

After some research, I found a couple classes I might take. My plan so far is to enroll in some 3d animation and game programming classes, in order to gain knowledge, reputation, and maybe some partners in the buisness.

I am also creating a short animated commercial for my dads boss at work. He works for a aircraft part manufacturing company. I'm not getting paid, but we're hoping the boss will invest in our company or promote us later on.

eagleeyed
09-13-2011, 11:57 PM
skywalker113, I think that the general opinion of the room is that you can't do your idea.

I am glad you used the word general, as I believe in everything you just said. I am not '40' yet, only 22 so I am also in this dream and aim for the stars business.

Thing is though, I know my series I am writing has a 99% chance of flunking and not going anywhere, especially for a first attempt.

However, I look at it as all a learning experence, my animation skills are still very noobish, and to be quite frank I need to really focus on my motivation and stop getting sidetracked. Working on that though.

In the end, even if this series doesnt work, I get thrown in first hand to alot of problems, solving all the quirks that 3D brings and hopefully have a hell of a good time while doing so. Plus its experience for next time.

Just give it a shot, just dont think and disillusion yourself that the first thing will be a major hit, you will just crash down and may end up not doing a second. At your/our age feel we have little to loose, without supporting a family, house mortgage etc (can't wait to get me one of those ;)) its prime time to have a go at doing stuff.

Even though my project is still in writing and about to enter visualisation stage and I am learning in my own time 3D, already have people willing to help, an amazing composer, a writer for guidence etc. If you do succeed a building the friend base it does look more realistic.

Good luck.

LW_Will
09-14-2011, 01:19 AM
I bake your pudding?!

Ex-squeeze me?!

I absolutely and resolutely resent the notion that 40 is VERY OLD!

Bl00dy cheek.

I'm 46... I win. ;-)

Gwods... I'm 46... :help:

archijam
09-14-2011, 01:37 AM
Check out Unity3D. Perhaps aiming for a game for Android or iPhone would be your best bet with low overheads and limited programming knowledge ..

To get jobs, one of the crucial things is a proven track record. Half finished projects, no matter how nice, can work directly against you.

Finish some projects, document the process, show you can do it efficiently and well ... and you may just get some clients :)

LW_Will
09-14-2011, 01:44 AM
eagleeyed, I understand your feelings. You and skywalker have a unique position that allows you to develop your writing, animation skills... your story telling skills.

I went to film school and I'll tell you what I learned, PLAN. Before to "expose film" (or in the digital age... I don't know, create pictures...) before you've spent dollar one (and here I think that time = money) you have infinite control. You have infinite time. Understand this, that allows you to take all the time in the world. Also, unfortunately, it also gives you all the time in the world. You can be buried under the sand in that hour glass.
(I'm mixing my metaphors, I think.)

Case in point, in film school, I had a film appreciation class that was run by a TA. He was young, and enthusiastic, and he would always discuss film with anyone. He was working on his Thesis Film. After that film, we would leave school and go out into the world. He was on his third edit print of the film (an actual film, no digital here) and he was trying to save enough cash to pay for another print. Then he would try again.

Now, that guy probably isn't finished with his thesis film yet. A guy with all the training, access to an entire film school worth of equipment and teachers, and he still couldn't make his mind up about his thesis.

When you make a film (Live action, animated, whatever) you need to set limits on yourself. The quality goes up the more limitations are placed on you. You rent the film equipment, you have the location for a limited time. You can't really draw another image. You've built, textured, rigged, animated and did all the dynamic animations for your digital film and you JUST WANT IT TO END! All of those limits and people telling you "no" allow you to rebel and tell them "Hell No!"

I've read a few books about this Stu Maschwitz has writen the "The DV Rebel’s Guide: An All-Digital Approach to Making Killer Action Movies on the Cheap" and Robert Rodriguez' "The Robert Rodriguez 10 Minute Film School" pieces off his movies that are available on YouTube. Watch them. Several times each. Understand how he is making his movies cheaper while putting in as much screen value as he can. Watch especially the videos where he has his "Film Empire" in Austin, TX. See what he does and how it relates to the both of you. You will learn something.

Tomorrow, make a film. 30 seconds... a minute... whatever. Make as many as you can, because one day they will not suck.

I guarantee it.

But its late and I am tired.

Night.

Hieron
09-14-2011, 03:45 AM
I am also creating a short animated commercial for my dads boss at work. He works for a aircraft part manufacturing company. I'm not getting paid, but we're hoping the boss will invest in our company or promote us later on.

You do have big plans (Blizzard etc..), do know that it can go slowly and will have ups and downs.

Personally I would not spend time or money on traditional classes (business nor CG) but spend all that energy (and save you the big debt) on teaching yourself and building a business from the ground up.

As said, the very most important part is business. CG is 2nd. Besides doing the gig for your dads boss (a really fine way to start, it will give you experience on both accounts, even if you fail or he doesn't invest later on)

On the business side: try to get a "mentor". Is there *anyone* you know, that has years of experience running a business (any business, CG is not that important here) Getting one enthousiastic to help you out will be a tad easier if you have some stuff/capabilities to show. (tutorial results may work fine) He can help you with tons of stuff. Here in NL, such help can be had and is supported by government.

On the CG side:Try to scour the web and do many many tutorials and applying that knowledge in your projects. Pour in hours, every day. And enjoy it. Get feedback/critique from forums, skilled friends etc.


Personally, I wouldn't start out with 5 people right from the get go. I foresee a big messy, inefficient, unskilled mess. But perhaps it works, if it doesn't it was experience :)

OnlineRender
09-14-2011, 06:51 AM
I finally got a cheque threw the door for 386.12 for our xna game released last year Microsoft took nearly all in 70% , the main coder "c" got double that .. not bad for sitting up a few extra hours at night .... my point being there more than one way to skin a cat ....

Imatk
09-25-2011, 12:51 AM
Lesson 1



Lesson 6
[INDENT]For Part 1, hire people to handle that side of things. They are a dime a dozen, so you'll never have to worry about running out of a labour-force to make your product or service.



Lesson 9 try to not refer to the people who will ultimately determine the success of your product, movie, etc. as "a dime a dozen" it's a bad idea to have that kind of attitude and it gets around... in other words none of the "dime a dozen" people will work for your company if you're the kind of business owner that refers to his employees as such.

BTW Shabazzy I'd be interested to know what VFX or game company you own... I'd like to relate your ideas to some of my colleagues.

Shabazzy
09-25-2011, 04:51 AM
Lesson 9 try to not refer to the people who will ultimately determine the success of your product, movie, etc. as "a dime a dozen" it's a bad idea to have that kind of attitude and it gets around... in other words none of the "dime a dozen" people will work for your company if you're the kind of business owner that refers to his employees as such.

BTW Shabazzy I'd be interested to know what VFX or game company you own... I'd like to relate your ideas to some of my colleagues.

I'm a freelance animator and web developer sir, and one thing I know about business, is that there are a hell of a lot of talented (but poor) artist types doing grunt work and very few Walter Elias Disney's.

There's a reason for this. Only a few people understand the nature of money and how to make it, but there's a hell of a lot more people out there who don't.

Statements like 'the people who ultimately determine the success of your product, movie, etc' when refering to staff tells me which category you fall into. And I mean no disrespect to you when I say it.

Trust me, it ain't the staff that determine how successful a product is, they only do what the boss tells them.

Having respect for your staff is one thing, but believing they're irreplaceable is another.

Shabazzy

Imatk
09-25-2011, 10:00 AM
I'm a freelance animator and web developer sir, and one thing I know about business, is that there are a hell of a lot of talented (but poor) artist types doing grunt work and very few Walter Elias Disney's.

There's a reason for this. Only a few people understand the nature of money and how to make it, but there's a hell of a lot more people out there who don't.

Statements like 'the people who ultimately determine the success of your product, movie, etc' when refering to staff tells me which category you fall into. And I mean no disrespect to you when I say it.

Trust me, it ain't the staff that determine how successful a product is, they only do what the boss tells them.

Having respect for your staff is one thing, but believing they're irreplaceable is another.

Shabazzy

So you have no business yet you are giving advice to someone one how to start, run, and be successful in one?

Great advice I'm sure he should hold as very legitimate and important.

Having respect for your staff would show that you wouldn't refer or think of them as "a dime a dozen." That shows exactly the kind of attitude you would have toward your employees IF you had any, which you don't?

And not referring to your team as "a dime a dozen" has nothing to do with the idea of someone being "irreplaceable."

Of course people can be replaced, but if you run a studio where you don't respect your team and HAVE to replace them because you are a jerk that no one wants to work for/with then your replacements will soon become scarce and the quality of them will degrade.

And as far as the artist "doing what the boss tells them" some people are less capable of "doing what the boss tells them" than others. So just because the "boss" tells them to do it doesn't necessarily mean it will translate.

It seems to me like you're talking from a position of ignorance.

I've been doing this for quite a while and have both run my own business and managed other artists. I've worked in the film and television industry and video game industry. For you to give advice on something that you may have no experience with seems both foolish and counterproductive.

To the OP............

My best advice to you would be this... if you want to start a studio, first focus on ONE thing that you want to develop.

Right now you're spreading yourself thin and despite what some people think or may tell you video games and film are VASTLY different.

The budgets are completely different, the method of distribution for both products is completely different.

Decide what you want to focus on FIRST.

If possible try and get inside one of the major studios you are trying to emulate. Many of them have internships and learning how this business works from the inside will be invaluable to you down the road not to mention the contacts you will make and may ultimately need to get off the ground.

It will also give you an idea of how budgets work and what time frames are expected for delivery within those budgets from the studio (movies) or publisher (games).

And maybe the best advice I could give you... take everything ANYONE tells you with a grain of salt.

Decide for YOURSELF what you feel is valid advice and go from there.

Good luck.

Ryste3d
09-25-2011, 03:55 PM
My advice is, if you love to work with 3d as an artist like the most of us in this forum, get a job...

Running a business you will have no time to work with what you love. Believe me I know. But if you decide to go down that business road, remember to always hire people better then you

Shabazzy
09-25-2011, 07:14 PM
So you have no business yet you are giving advice to someone one how to start, run, and be successful in one?

In your opinion I have no business. But that's because you don't fully understand the word.


Great advice I'm sure he should hold as very legitimate and important.
One would hope so.


Having respect for your staff would show that you wouldn't refer or think of them as "a dime a dozen." That shows exactly the kind of attitude you would have toward your employees IF you had any, which you don't?
How one view staff and how one TREATS staff are two different things. But being overly sensitive, you wouldn't know that. And FYI, I've employed staff on many occasions.


And not referring to your team as "a dime a dozen" has nothing to do with the idea of someone being "irreplaceable."

Of course people can be replaced, but if you run a studio where you don't respect your team and HAVE to replace them because you are a jerk that no one wants to work for/with then your replacements will soon become scarce and the quality of them will degrade.

Again, jumping to conclusions about referring to equating to ill-treatment of, because of your over sensitivity.


And as far as the artist "doing what the boss tells them" some people are less capable of "doing what the boss tells them" than others. So just because the "boss" tells them to do it doesn't necessarily mean it will translate.
So, how would the boss's failure to translate his/her requirements equate to the artists deciding whether a project is a success or not? Surely that would fall on the boss's shoulders. You've pretty much validated my point.


It seems to me like you're talking from a position of ignorance.
Well, it would wouldn't it? Being over sensitive usually does cloud rationality.


I've been doing this for quite a while and have both run my own business and managed other artists. I've worked in the film and television industry and video game industry. For you to give advice on something that you may have no experience with seems both foolish and counterproductive.


First of all Jamie, you know absolutely nothing about me. So therefore you have absolutely no qualifications in drawing any kind of conclusion about what experience I may or may not have.

To be so presumptuous about the legitimacy of my comments based on this one post absolutely reeks of arrogance on your part.

'A dime a dozen' is not an offensive or disrespectful term. It's just a statement of fact. Blunt, maybe. But still a statement of fact. You obviously are a very sensitive person who gets upset VERY easily if people choose to use terms you find upsetting. And because I don't really want to get into an argument with you, simply because it seems to me that you're unable to comprehend the entire scope of what I'm saying in my statement. I'm just goiing to draw a line here.

I'm at a loss as to how you equate being a freelancer to meaning that you don't have your own business. It's bizarre. Just because you're a freelancer doesn't mean the same rules of business will not apply to you. You ARE still running a business.

You have to:

Find clients
Bid for Contracts
Market your service
Promote your service
Manage your finances
Make projections
Do the accounts
Do the legals (contracts etc)
And more

And yes, sometimes you do need to subcontract or hire staff to help with a project, which means that you have to deal with employment issues too.

Being a freelancer can cover a wide range of situations and conditions. Just like any business. But you wouldn't know all that would you?

Try not to look down your nose at freelancers unless you've walked in their shoes.

And for your information, I'm run a very successful business. I wouldn't have been doing it for 16 years if I didn't.

Shabazzy

Imatk
09-25-2011, 08:57 PM
I asked you a simple question... what studio do you own/run?

Since the OP's intention is to run and own a studio I feel that's a fairly valid question don't you?

"How one view staff and how one TREATS staff are two different things. But being overly sensitive, you wouldn't know that. And FYI, I've employed staff on many occasions."

So you view your staff as "dime a dozen" but treat them differently? This doesn't make sense to me... unless of course your dishonest with your staff as to how you see them? Or would you openly tell them you view them as "dime a dozen?" I somehow doubt that since I doubt anyone would want to work for an employer who feels this way about their staff.


"Again, jumping to conclusions about referring to equating to ill-treatment of, because of your over sensitivity."

Ok I guess you could say I'm sensitive... your opinion I guess... I just happen to like working with people who treat AND view each other with respect... never heard of viewing someone one way and treating them another... unless of course you're dishonest (see above)

"So, how would the boss's failure to translate his/her requirements equate to the artists deciding whether a project is a success or not? Surely that would fall on the boss's shoulders. You've pretty much validated my point."


I'm not even sure what you're saying here... but I think you may need to re-read my post. I wasn't referring to a boss' failure to translate his/her requirements... I was referring to the artists ability to complete those requirements and some are better than others (more talented) in that respect.


"Well, it would wouldn't it? Being over sensitive usually does cloud rationality."

I'm not seeing how my pointing out the fact that you neither own nor run a studio as being oversensitive or irrational. Again read above... if the OP asked "What are the steps I need to take to become a successful freelancer and web developer" then it would be right up your alley... otherwise it simply isn't... perhaps YOU are being overly sensitive?


"First of all Jamie, you know absolutely nothing about me. So therefore you have absolutely no qualifications in drawing any kind of conclusion about what experience I may or may not have.

To be so presumptuous about the legitimacy of my comments based on this one post absolutely reeks of arrogance on your part."

You're right I know absolutely nothing about you. As for being "arrogant" I didn't draw my conclusion about you from my perspective, it came from your reply.

You stated you did not run or own a studio... so if you don't then you have no idea what you are talking about when it comes to owning or running a studio. Or am I wrong?

And as far as "looking down" on freelancers... I never stated anything of the sort. Again maybe YOU are being overly sensitive?

----------------
Put simply Shabazzy, you made statements that I didn't agree with. The reason I asked what studio you ran was because I was curious of how you could be successful in this business with that type of attitude.

Because I've never encountered a studio that equates their staff as "dime a dozen" that was successful so it piqued my interest. I wondered if I knew anyone that may have worked with you or for you.

You then replied that you didn't own nor run a studio.

I find advice from someone that has no frame of reference irresponsible. That's why I wrote what I wrote, and I haven't changed my stance on that, unless of course you've informed me incorrectly?

Out of curiosity... what movies have you worked on, or video games?

NinoK
09-26-2011, 12:43 PM
While I understand where Shabazzy is coming from, I offer a different opinion. Also while I assume he has seen success going by his mantra, I can vouch for mine the same way.

The way I look at things is what I 'sell' is talent. This is a company's no1 asset and should be treated as such. The actual product is secondary. Good people make good work. Good work is noticed which brings in more work. Be very selective of people and hire only those who fit the culture and have the talent to produce work that will get noticed. Surround yourself with people who excel at their craft and then reward those people well by making it worth their while. Enable them to learn and improve their craft. In my experience, smart talented people are certainly not a dime a dozen in either the creative or the accounting side of things.

To the OP, I would not attempt to start a business without first working in the field directly to get your feet wet. Get hired at an entry position first and figure out what all is involved. Ask lots of questions. :)

skywalker113
10-05-2011, 07:05 PM
Let me explain a better idea of whats going on.

My family and I have purchased 5 computers in 2009. Our plan was to start a animation club that physically meets together. We found a local non profit art organization in town. They let us keep the 5 computers inside a room of theirs. I was still in highschool, and was working very intensly on a movie for my senior project. I could not find the time to start the club. Once I graduated, I started working on another huge project that was a spaceship battle. It took me over a year to partialy finish it. I didnt know it would take so long, but I just had to get something done!

Now im ready to start the animation group. And hopefully evolve into a business some day.

I am thinking of calling a few friends to see if they are interested in being part of the small business. They know some animation. I will probably have to reteach them some since they have not done it in a while. But now, for the money issue...

My idea for us to start out is to create models for turbosquid and other websites. Eventually we'll have a collections of models. When one of them sells, we'll split the profits. It could be evenly. Or something like, the person who built the model gets 70% of it and the rest of us split the 30% evenly.

Another idea is to do adverticments to local busineses in town. This is probably where the money lies. If theres other animators working on it, we can split the profits on a commission basis.

Thanks for the feedback!

pauland
10-05-2011, 07:35 PM
I would test the water yourself, first and definitely do some research.

On the model front, look at the effort required to make a model and how may you think you might sell. You are in a fiercely competitive arena with many competitors that are skilled and fast. On the 70/30 split. Sounds good until one person who is better than the others, sells more and makes more models may well realise they can make more money by going it alone. Who owns the models? The modeller or is it collective?

Selling advertising to businesses? Are there enough potential clients? Do they want 3D advertising? Can they pay enough? Can you make a cost effective ad that is as cheap to produce and effective as an ad produced using real video and/or a 2D/2.5D technology? Are you able to sell to these clients? Whose looking after the accounts and taxes?

Your spaceship battle took a year. Is it any good? Is it good enough for someone to pay say $20,000 for if they paid for your time?

There are a lot of hurdles and you can find the answer to the questions by spending a little time before jumping in feet first.

Make a model, try and sell it, see how it goes.
Find out what the potential market is for 3D animation locally and the likely budget. See what's already out there - can you compete in quality and speed?

You need a plan to follow to test whether the idea is viable.

Aquarian
10-05-2011, 09:50 PM
Well everyone's advice/opinion on here is worth considering but it's best not to make decisions based on others opinions or you'll just get blown around like a reed in the wind.

Everyone has to start somewhere, usually with next to nothing. Best thing would be to focus on small projects you know you can complete with the available resources, learn from mistakes and continue forward to greater challenges. The real key to success is not giving up and not letting obstacles and failures deter you from your goals.

There is no "Law" that says you have to be rich and powerful to be successful, success is usually wrought from a string of failures...whether it's the invention of the light bulb or making a hit movie or game.

I'll just conclude with a quote from Calvin Coolidge on the power of persistence:


"Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence.

Talent will not;
Nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent.

Genius will not;
Unrewarded genius is almost a proverb.

Education will not;
The world is full of educated derelicts.

Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent."


Good words to live by, and all those points have been proven over and over to me.