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View Full Version : Why Diffuse Shading over Color?



raw-m
08-08-2011, 10:48 AM
I've been looking further into the "Shading" inputs on the Surface editor nodes. Looking at a few examples of peoples work on the threads I'm noticing that "Diffuse Shading" and "Specular Shading" is favoured over the more traditional "Color" and "Specular" inputs. Why is that what are the benefits?

Finding a clear explanation of these inputs is hard (the manuals seem to only mention what to plug into them, not why). Any explanation to help clean up my confusion would be really welcome!

Lightwolf
08-08-2011, 11:40 AM
The "Shading" inputs expect the respective colour after is has been lit and shaded by the node that outputs them.

The others are essentially input values for the default lambert/blinn shading system that also drives the classic, layered surface editor.

Cheers,
Mike

raw-m
08-08-2011, 04:37 PM
Thanks Mike but I'm struggling a little to decode that first sentance! The way I'm starting to see it is that you basically use the shaders to get a different look over LWs default system. These shader inputs seem to override other inputs so it's a case of learning which ones are ignored (would be useful for the Node editor to grey out the redundant inputs if no longer relevant), which ones are useful and I guess experience will tell me which Shaders to use on which surface to get the look I'm after.

Is there a guide somewhere that says "if you use x then a, b and c do nothing"? Don't say the manual, I've tried!

raw-m
08-08-2011, 04:39 PM
Thanks Mike but I'm struggling a little to decode that first sentance! The way I'm starting to see it is that you basically use the shaders to get a different look over LWs default system. These shader inputs seem to override other inputs so it's a case of learning which ones are ignored (would be useful for the Node editor to grey out the redundant inputs if no longer relevant), which ones are useful and I guess experience will tell me which Shaders to use on which surface to get the look I'm after.

Is there a guide somewhere that says "if you use x then a, b and c do nothing"? Don't say the manual, I've tried!

Dodgy
08-08-2011, 06:39 PM
Basically you got it. Plugging in a shader overrides the respective inputs (diffuse overrides colour and diffuse, specular shading overrides the default specular etc), and plugging in a material overrides everything.

Basically you have the freedom to mix and match nodes as you see fit to achieve the result you're after, so just play.