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archiea
10-08-2003, 02:30 PM
I thougt at the least this would be inspiring to us mac folks....

http://digitallyobsessed.com/showreview.php3?ID=4782

http://homepage.mac.com/edahand/iblog/B1323778479/C1647187615/E1489850237/

http://www.advfilms.com/favorites/voices/interviews/interviews.shtml


I don't know if he used LW, but its almost irrelevant when you consider that he created and published a 25 min animated story and much of the work was done on a G4....

Beamtracer
10-08-2003, 10:59 PM
This is pretty cool. I'll get hold of the DVD. It shows what can be done with a Mac G4 and a talented artist.

Some of the world's best animation comes out of Japan. Anyone see 'Spirited Away'?
http://www.nausicaa.net/miyazaki/sen/
Beautiful, beautiful animation. It's worth buying the DVD. Puts Disney to shame.

jasonwestmas
10-09-2003, 01:33 PM
Miyazaki is by far one of the greatest artist ever to step foot on this planet! Most certainly, no one has accomplished his level of creativity and originality. Pixar and Disney can sell a product but if you ask me they're in a creative rut. Glad you like good anime Beam!:)

archiea
10-09-2003, 09:22 PM
Pixar still delivers beter stuff than Disney...

However, out of the three, Miyazaki is the closest thing we have to a Walt Disney....

Alot of that you can attribute to the attitude of the cultre and country.....

In Japan, Miyazaki is considered a national treasure..

In the US, its all commercialism... Look at the highest paid stars that call themselves "actors" in the US. Which one of them would you call a national treasure....

Japan has Miyazaki....

US has Ben Afleck and J-Lo...

Have you guys heard of how Miyazaki thought up of "Spirited Away"? He was at an amusement park in Japan and noted how 10 year old girls in Japan were kind of listless and had no "heros" to look up to... So he made up the whole world in the film centered around this girl.

Disney films start out OK, sometimes even really good. Then its mutilated by target audiences, marketing, Eisner playing ceasar with story points... its almost a creative version of the enron scandal... except its people getting robbed of sheer freedom to create.

I know alot of people wo didn't "get" Spirited Away. there was nothing to get.... You just went on a journey with this little girl.....

You guys should check out "the cat returns, also done by Studio Gibli... its like a spirited Away for 15 year old girls....

there was a forum with the director and producer of "the Cat Returns" over at the US Debut in Hollywood.

The Director was a young guy, and it was his first picture. the film started off small then it got bigger because the studio was so charmed by it.

When asked if they intended a US distribution, they replied that they would welcome one. They also said how they loved american audiences... that in japan, the children laugh at the funny points in the film, but in America, its the adults... A point that brings home how starved we are in this country for original, charming content. Also, alot of us "adults" today were weaned on WB cartoons... the classics, and I believe that alot of us yearn for that again....

One person asked if, considering the worled wide interest garnered by the film, if they would taylor future productions for a more broad, world wide appeal, the producer, of all people, said no without hesitation. He said that he made films that they see as good films, and that perhaps thats the appeal of their movies, as opposed to trying to chase the current market...

In all, they answered the questions with such confidence in intent. Alot of US studios answer like questions like politicians... vague and off topic...

I hope that "Voices" becomes spearhead for a more grass roots approach towards storytelling.

I believe the growth seen just in the CGTalk community and their Gallery is an indication of how the democray that is the internet may become the spark for alot of future storytellers, if not studio heads...

mlinde
10-09-2003, 10:08 PM
The sub-subject says it all. Show me the last original American film. Not some blockbuster summer explosion, not some comic book cross-over, not some remake of a film originally done in black and white with Cary Grant or Frank Sinatra, not some european or asian film remade for the "stupid" american audience.

American filmmaking is about dollars for studios. Animation in america is about how many action figure and fast-food tie-ins can be sold. A genius anime film from the early 90s, Akira, is a prime example. It played in art houses in the US, but gained a cult following. When the DVD came out a few years ago, it was accompanied by a line of action figures. This is american marketing at it's best.

"It's all about cross-marketing and sunglasses and shoes...you choose"
-Ani DiFranco

The quick-buck/big-buck culture of America sucks dry the creative energy of multiple industries, filmmaking is just one. If you pitch an idea and it doesn't have a character that will either sell action figures or look good in a happy meal, you might as well stay home. Drama is all about shock value, Sci-Fi is all about special effects, and somewhere around 1990 America forgot about the story as a driving force in movie making.

Oh, I guess that was a bit of a rant. Well, now you know how I feel. As if you cared :rolleyes:

wacom
10-09-2003, 10:11 PM
I own a box set of Miyazaki works- great stuff. Miyazaki pulls off certain things that, if they ever were attempted by a major US cartoon studio, would fail. No- I'm not talking about the look either- it's the story telling. My Neighbor Totoro would make even the most hardened criminal's heart melt. My favorite so far is Princess Mononoki...but I have yet to get through all of the 10 I own.

I like to watch the Miyazaki films when I'm feeling like doing something "hyper real" in Lightwave- as it reminds me that going "unreal" and telling a great story can be far more powerful and open new creative doors...

Just my two cents...

Blessed
10-09-2003, 10:13 PM
It was done in Lightwave I read this some time ago.

DISCOMUNICATION
10-10-2003, 02:10 PM
Yeah, he used LightWave, Commotion, Photoshop, and Illustrator all running under OS 9 for this series. That was a couple of years ago. I wounder what his set up is now?
Studio Ghibli(Miyazaki's studio) uses Softimage. They switched from 3D to XSI a year ago.
Production I.G. (www.productionig.com) has been using a lot of Maya with thier current projects ,Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex (TV show) and Ghost in the Shell: Innocence, although Samurai from NYC has mentioned he is starting to learn XSI which while working on GiTS: Stand Alone Complex. They typically do 3D work on Winblowz workstations and compositing on Macs. They even use LightWave on some projects! I find thier forum as informative and active as this one. The even kinda look the same (both grey). If you're in the theater this weekend they did the anime sequence in Kill Bill.