PDA

View Full Version : Gonna use Google+ to promote your work? Think again!



chco2
07-06-2011, 08:23 AM
Hi fellow wavers.
Google's new service and it's answer to social networking (or Google Facebook) is creating some real buzz.
This could be a real good medium to promote your 3D work in, but watch out!
In Google+ fineprint there's a part that states that whatever you post or use with the Google+ service you thereby hand over all rights of the item posted. Google can use it to sell it, market it, advertise it, modify it.. actually everything!

Below is part of the Google+ agreement.
My post here is just to make sure you are aware of what happens when posting to Google+


“By submitting, posting or displaying the content you give Google a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, and non-exclusive license to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute any Content which you submit, post or display on or through, the Services.”

“You agree that this license includes a right for Google to make such Content available to other companies, organizations or individuals with whom Google has relationships for the provision of syndicated services, and to use such Content in connection with the provision of those services.”

“You understand that Google, in performing the required technical steps to provide the Services to our users, may (a) transmit or distribute your Content over various public networks and in various media; and (b) make such changes to your Content as are necessary to conform and adapt that Content to the technical requirements of connecting networks, devices, services or media. You agree that this license shall permit Google to take these actions.”

cagey5
07-06-2011, 08:43 AM
These first came to light when they launched googlemail, so in theory even something you sent via e-mail could be used by them presumeably for any purpose they saw fit.

OnlineRender
07-06-2011, 08:49 AM
3djunkies watermarks every image you upload ,and all content is walled gardened ....ie you choose permissions own,friends ,public ect .....and well the way I see it ,you made you own it ,all I ask is for permission to use the artwork for jazzing the site up ....via email first of course

Lightwolf
07-06-2011, 09:41 AM
Well, effectively since the host and publish the content they do need those rights.
There is where little they could change to make it less sever given the concept of a social network.

After all, this is only true for the content that you upload and not for the actual work.

Cheers,
Mike

monovich
07-06-2011, 09:54 AM
dropbox does this as well. fyi.

that said, I'm not worried.

Sekhar
07-06-2011, 10:01 AM
Below is part of the Google+ agreement.
My post here is just to make sure you are aware of what happens when posting to Google+

This is the standard stuff they have for YouTube too, that doesn't mean you give up rights. See the terms page (http://www.youtube.com/static?gl=US&template=terms) section 6(c).

chco2
07-06-2011, 10:10 AM
Actually, you do give up your rights. As soon as content is online with the Google+ service, you wave your rights to that content. You can of course have the original at home. But you are telling Google they are free to do with it as they please. So claiming ownership later on is a no go.

I'm not going into further discussion here, I just wanted the discussion started as many people are not aware of this. And it then would be a very big surprise if you have a catalog online showing your talent and all of a sudden you see other companies using your online stuff to promote their stuff.

chco2
07-06-2011, 10:13 AM
Never saw a video as a terms page section 6.

With vimeo and youtube it is the same. My post is just to give notice to people posting imagery on Google+ to promote their stuff. They should think twice before doing so and/or at least watermark it and such.


This is the standard stuff they have for YouTube too, that doesn't mean you give up rights. See the terms page (http://player.vimeo.com/video/6518109?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0) section 6(c).

Sekhar
07-06-2011, 11:12 AM
Never saw a video as a terms page section 6.

With vimeo and youtube it is the same. My post is just to give notice to people posting imagery on Google+ to promote their stuff. They should think twice before doing so and/or at least watermark it and such.

Below is section 6(c) from the terms page (http://www.youtube.com/static?gl=US&template=terms). Giving someone a license to use your content is not the same as giving up rights to that content.

For clarity, you retain all of your ownership rights in your Content. However, by submitting Content to YouTube, you hereby grant YouTube a worldwide, non-exclusive, royalty-free, sublicenseable and transferable license to use, reproduce, distribute, prepare derivative works of, display, and perform the Content in connection with the Service and YouTube's (and its successors' and affiliates') business, including without limitation for promoting and redistributing part or all of the Service (and derivative works thereof) in any media formats and through any media channels. You also hereby grant each user of the Service a non-exclusive license to access your Content through the Service, and to use, reproduce, distribute, display and perform such Content as permitted through the functionality of the Service and under these Terms of Service. The above licenses granted by you in video Content you submit to the Service terminate within a commercially reasonable time after you remove or delete your videos from the Service. You understand and agree, however, that YouTube may retain, but not display, distribute, or perform, server copies of your videos that have been removed or deleted. The above licenses granted by you in user comments you submit are perpetual and irrevocable.

NanoGator
07-06-2011, 11:21 AM
Their service cannot legally work without those rights.

chco2
07-06-2011, 11:54 AM
Again not going into discussion here as you clearly miss the whole point of this post. If you have or do not have problems with having ownership but waving all rights to the service holder or with the Google terms in general.. I really do not care as it is a different subject.

NanoGator
07-06-2011, 11:59 AM
Again not going into discussion here as you clearly miss the whole point of this post.

I get the point, you're not getting mine. You're not giving them your copyright, you're granting them the rights they need to publish it.. which is exactly what you're trying to do if you're using them to promote you.

Blimey this reeks of Slashdot sensationalism.