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Pixelight
05-04-2011, 04:03 PM
Ok, so there were a lot of people asking me to post images and more details of what I知 trying to do to make it easier for people to help. For that reason I decided to start a thread about it instead of putting it in the old thread to make it easier and cleaner.

What I知 trying to do is a photo real turned ON light bulb.

This is what I want to do:

http://www.businesspundit.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/zzlightbulb.jpg


This is how it looks at the moment from Lightwave:

http://s1.postimage.org/q8odbtok/Bulb_render.jpg (http://postimage.org/image/q8odbtok/)
F9 render, screen grabbed at 100% and saved as a jpeg.


Using a Dielectric material for the glass globe,
Filament has 125% Luminosity and Glow enabled also at 125%
I have radiosity ON in the render globals.

What will it take to make it look like the photo?
I have done everything I could think off.

If you need any more info or pictures and screen grabs please let me know.
I would also gladly post the project.

Thanks in advance for the help.

Pixelight
05-04-2011, 04:06 PM
I hope the pictures are showing this time.

Igu4n4
05-04-2011, 04:26 PM
The most glaring issue is the lack of light :) You need to build a light source.

If you break it down, there's a filament that gets electricity through it, it heats, to the point it is emitting light. That light is so intense that when we look at it, there is a glow to it. Depending on the type of glass (clear in this case), the visible light (glow) is centered around that filament, emitting outwards with a short falloff. Because the glass is clear, it doesn't bounce much light back, instead it passes through to the environment. If the bulb were smoked, the bulb itself would appear to reflect more light upon itself, thus illuminating it.

So.. that said... your current render is of pristine glass.. there isn't a flaw in it to bounce light back. If you look at the example, there is a lot of dirt and debris on the glass that will reflect the light and thus illuminate the bulb. So.. that is your first priority in getting this to start to look like the photo. You can achieve this in several ways. First off to get yourself started, put a point light in the center of the bulb. There are better ways of using lights to achieve this, but to start,.. being by doing that. Now you can actually SEE the bulb doing what it should do. You can then add an image map of dirt or dust to the glass that disrupts the transparency channel, (and you can use this in conjunction with the translucency channel as well). Depending on how much distress you want on the glass (is it really old, is it dusty, does it have calcium deposits on it.. etc etc) you must pick the appropriate image to distress that surface. You can fake luminosity on the surface of the glass by doing just that.. adding a dirt layer into the luminosity channel, but it has to be in conjunction with the dirt in the transparency channel, or the clear glass will have nothing to illuminate (if that makes sense).

I wouldn't worry about the reflections on the glass, or the screw head and mechanics of the bulb until you get the things mentioned above in the right direction. If your bulb and filament doesn't illuminate and reflect back on itself to make it visible, you don't have much of a light bulb.

Start there, and then we can finesse the other details after.

Steve.

Pixelight
05-04-2011, 05:10 PM
Thanks! Can I use a procedural texture to dirt up the glass instead of an image map? If not, what type of image map do you suggest?

Igu4n4
05-04-2011, 05:47 PM
you can most certainly use proceedurals... it's just that to get that fine dust, and grit/scratches, proceedurals are a bit more work, when you can probably find a dirt map online easy.

just a quick google of dirt maps, and you can find stuff.. something like this (even though it's paper), will probably help immediately... http://www.accodeum.net/images/tutorials/ps_oldphoto/dirtmap01.jpg

You'll probably want to pop that into Photoshop or another editor to clean up the seams (make it tileable).



Steve.

Pixelight
05-04-2011, 05:54 PM
Thanks. I tried the procedurals and I couldn't get it to work on the Dielectrical material, no matter what. Without the material and only using the surface editor the procedural definitely makes the glass dirty and visible if applied on the transparency channel, but it doesn't look as much as glass as the Dielectric. Can't this work on the Dielectric?

Thanks for the link.

Igu4n4
05-04-2011, 05:59 PM
The Material nodes are great for getting the main gist of what a surface should do. I personally build my own shader setups because I want precise control. It's up to you, but when you use a material node, you are limited to what you can access/plugin-in/plug-out.

For this honestly, you don't even need to use nodes if you'd rather use the standard setup. I'll put something together for you after I get the kids to bed.

Steve.

Pixelight
05-04-2011, 06:02 PM
Yeah, I tried applying the procedural to the transparency channel in the node editor using the 3D procedural and it did nothing.


I'll put something together for you after I get the kids to bed.

Steve.

That would be outstanding! :thumbsup:

Thanks a lot.

Pixelight
05-04-2011, 06:32 PM
This is as far as I got:

http://s1.postimage.org/qvjyynlw/Bulb_render_2.jpg (http://postimage.org/image/qvjyynlw/)

Luminosity 0%
Diffuse 100%
Specularity 50%
Glosiness 100%
reflection 20%
transparency 85% + procedural

Igu4n4
05-04-2011, 08:07 PM
Heya,..

So I put together a scene for you, (and built a lightbulb). You're welcome to use them.

I can outline what went on to get it the way it was, but sometimes it's easier to rip through a scene, and deconstruct it yourself so you can see what is what. One of the key's that you'll want to know is that the glow was done with hypervoxels in sprite mode. The rest is just careful surfacing in the standard surface editor (no nodes).

Here's a render, and a VPR/opengl shot so you can see where the lights are.

94892 94893

and here's the scene file. 94894

Anyway.. dig through the scene, and if you have questions, let me know.

(i'll xpost this your other thread as well).

Steve.

borkus
05-04-2011, 08:56 PM
I just wanted to say thank you to Igu4n4 because this is something that I'll be tackling soon and this will help immensely.

Igu4n4
05-04-2011, 11:01 PM
you're welcome!.. no problem.

Steve.

kolby
05-04-2011, 11:18 PM
Nice looking bulb !

Pixelight
05-05-2011, 03:20 PM
Heya,..

So I put together a scene for you, (and built a lightbulb). You're welcome to use them.


Wow!:bowdown:
Your generosity is unparalleled!
People like you really make this community a great place.
Thanks a lot for taking the time to do all that. It was great help and very educative.

The bulb looks fantastic! I really like it. This is exactly what I’ve been trying to do. This really inspires me to learn Lightwave inside out. It can do awesome things.:boogiedow

This is a huge eye opener about how things are normally much simpler than you think. When I was trying it on my own I had everything turned ON. Radiosity, occlusion, the works. I see you needed none of that.

By the way, I’m wondering how long it took you to do this? I’ve been working on it for days trying to get the right look.

So, I decided to continue using my own bulb and project and use yours as a reference to try to get my bulb looking like yours. I thought this could be a great learning experience since I would have to probably tweak things here and there to match.

It seems after I started to follow your tip of putting a point light inside the bulb and using a dirt map I wasn’t so far away. One thing that made a huge difference and I could have never imagined it was that I saw you had Double Sided turned ON for the Glass globe of the bulb in the Surface Editor. Just doing that brought the whole thing like 70% closer to the goal.

Then I proceeded to match all your settings inside the Surface Editor for all items. Next I matched all the Lights including placement, color, type, intensity etc. Then I matched camera settings and position and lastly the render settings. I didn’t get to the Hypervoxels part yet because I have yet to mess with it in Lightwave.
But I guess the surface you call Default is for the Hypervoxels?

Anyway, since I didn’t get to the hypervoxels I turned your hypervoxels OFF to make it easier to compare. This is how your bulb looks without the hypervoxels:

http://s2.postimage.org/1b05c010k/Your_bulb_without_hypervoxels.jpg (http://postimage.org/image/1b05c010k/)

Then after matching all your settings I hit F9 on my project and this is what I got:

http://s2.postimage.org/1azgixtlw/Bulb_render_3.jpg (http://postimage.org/image/1azgixtlw/)

I had no idea why it didn’t look at least similar to yours since all settings where the same. I guess the fact we were using different models/objects made a difference. So I started to study it and it looked like my point light inside of the bulb was too bright. But I set it to 150% just like yours and all other settings matched. Anyway, I reduced the light intensity and it worked. I ended up with 30% instead of 150%. It’s almost as if your glass was thicker and needed more light. :)
Here’s what mine looks like at 30% intensity:

http://s2.postimage.org/1azx2bajo/Bulb_render_4.jpg (http://postimage.org/image/1azx2bajo/)

Now this is as far as I got. It doesn’t look exactly like yours. The gradients for the glass seem different even though I matched your settings. Probably because the shape of the glass may be slightly different? Also no idea why but yours renders quite faster. I have the same render and surface settings.

Also my surface previews in the Surface Editor look different than yours even though they are both set to show render output. Not a biggie but I wondered why.

But what do you think? Can you tell anything by just looking at the renders as to why it could still look quite different? Yours definitely looks more photorealistic.

Next I will give hypervoxels a shot. I will try to figure how it works, read the manual and look for some tuts etc.

Thanks a lot once more Steve. This was really, really helpful.

jeric_synergy
05-05-2011, 04:08 PM
Kudos to Steve for his generosity. :thumbsup:

Igu4n4
05-05-2011, 11:07 PM
Hey Pixel,..

Glad it's all helping you learn, and get inspired! Nodes are very powerful, and in the right hands can do amazing things, but they are also complex, and take a good bit of thought. You can do a lot of things with the normal surface editor. I personally prefer to use it, as I find it fast, and effective, and often quite simple, as you've seen.

It took me about 30 minutes to do, but you have to remember I've been using this program for a long time, and use it everyday professionally. Don't put yourself to time constraints when working on learning, take your time, digest, and exhale... it will all come.

I think your end result looks great. There are differences, but that's what makes it yours. I can see your concern is that if you copied the settings exactly, why are things different. Well that could be for a lot of reasons.
The shape of the bulbs is relatively the same, so the reflection should be consistent. My object is double sided by shader, but not by geometry (ie, it does not have modelled thickness), so check and see if yours does. That would cause a lot more bounces of reflections and would increase your rendering time, as well as change your result.
Why your reflections are different Im not sure, check and see if you've adjusted the rotation of the image in the backdrop->background->imageworld settings. I think you might have the wrong image in there (should be the kitchenprobe-iguana.hdr). Also your lighting is off a bit because I can see at the bottom metal cap, it is receiving no directional lighting, and it isn't reflecting anything either... so I'm thinking that you dont have the imageworld setup. I think in the bulb glass surface, I might have left a spherical map in there, (in the environment tab). It should be set to Raytrace and backdrop, not spherical map.. so make sure that is setup right. I checked the scene and it is in there, but it's turned off so make sure you didnt turn it on when you were recreating.

Your best bet is to take the bulb I gave you and put it beside your bulb in the same scene... it will quickly become apparent what is different, and you can copy and paste surfaces between each object parts to see if results change depending on which you're using. And on that note, the DEFAULT surface is just that.. I must have left a polygon in the model with that surface name. It has nothing to do with Hypervoxels.

If you took your object into the scene I provided, and it is the same size (is the object the same size?), then the environments should be consistent. The problem you were having with the light, is that I used a Inverse falloff with a range. I don't know if you copied that step. This goes back to the size question.. if we're using different sized objects, then the falloff distance had to be adjusted. If you didnt put a falloff, then that is why your light is over illuminating. Basically it is reaching too far out.

Anyway.. try those things out, and post away, if you need any more clarification or have questions.. just ask.

Steve.

colkai
05-06-2011, 03:15 AM
It took me about 30 minutes to do, but you have to remember I've been using this program for a long time, and use it everyday professionally. Don't put yourself to time constraints when working on learning, take your time, digest, and exhale... it will all come.

Steve.

Have to say, this little statement is probably the best advice out there, even though it sounds so simple. :agree: :thumbsup:

Tackle everything in stages too, if you think you can't do "the whole thing", look at it and try to find things you can isolate.
A really basic example, a table, break it down into legs, cross beams, top.
The leg, is it one piece? does it have forms that have to intersect or can you get the result by say, putting a torus around a cylinder to give the effect?
You then start to apply that way of thinking to other projects and trust me, you will surprise yourself. :)

Pixelight
05-06-2011, 10:44 AM
Hi Steve.

Thanks for the reply.

Yeah, the node editor is a bit more complicated. I'm still not sure if when you use it, if it totally cancels the surface editor or just the channels you use inside the node editor.

So it took you only 30min.? Man, must be nice to be that fast and knowledgeable about the program. One day.;)

It was a great tip to open both bulbs in the same scene. First I thought I would keep them separated to avoid messing any of your settings up. But now it really helped. One thing became obvious. Your bulb was much, much bigger. This is why I only needed 30% light intensity and you needed 150%. Once I sized my bulb to fit the size of yours the 150% was OK for my bulb. Also, because you background in the camera view and render was black I didn't even figure you had a HDR imageworld. This is definitely why the reflections and lighting were so different. Once I imported your imageworld it became much more similar.

Talking about the black background in your renders, what's that? Is it a setting that tells the camera not to see the imageworld and only see it's reflections or do you have a black plane behind your bulb? Because I couldn't find a black plane by looking at it or in the Scene Editor.



Why your reflections are different Im not sure, check and see if you've adjusted the rotation of the image in the backdrop->background->imageworld settings.


I couldn't find this menu or anything called imageworld settings. I only see image world under windows>backdrop options>backdrop.
But there I can't see imageworld settings. Where's this menu? A search for imageworld settings in the help files didn't find anything.



My object is double sided by shader, but not by geometry (ie, it does not have modelled thickness), so check and see if yours does. That would cause a lot more bounces of reflections and would increase your rendering time, as well as change your result.

I didn't build the model myself. It's a free model I got online. How do I check if my geometry is double sided?


And on that note, the DEFAULT surface is just that.. I must have left a polygon in the model with that surface name. It has nothing to do with Hypervoxels.

I see. I asked because I couldn't figure what this Default was doing in the scene or to what geometry it belongs?


By the way, I see you have a surface called glass inner with a gradient in the reflection channel. What is the purpose of this surface? I don't have anything like that in mine. Maybe this is why the glass doesn't look the "same"?

Thanks once more for your help.

Pixelight
05-06-2011, 10:45 AM
Have to say, this little statement is probably the best advice out there, even though it sounds so simple. :agree: :thumbsup:

Tackle everything in stages too, if you think you can't do "the whole thing", look at it and try to find things you can isolate.
A really basic example, a table, break it down into legs, cross beams, top.
The leg, is it one piece? does it have forms that have to intersect or can you get the result by say, putting a torus around a cylinder to give the effect?
You then start to apply that way of thinking to other projects and trust me, you will surprise yourself. :)

Thanks. This is a really good advice.

Igu4n4
05-06-2011, 02:18 PM
Hi Pixel,.. okay I have to say, I need your real name.. because I can't keep calling you Pixel... you are human right? (looks suspiciously).

I'm glad you brought the bulbs in together, because now you see the importance of working on the same scale. Scale effects everything from gradients, to light spread, to fall off, to texture size. All very important things.


Talking about the black background in your renders, what's that? Is it a setting that tells the camera not to see the imageworld and only see it's reflections or do you have a black plane behind your bulb? Because I couldn't find a black plane by looking at it or in the Scene Editor.

The Black background is a solid black bitmap that sits in the Effects menu, under the Compositing tab in the Background image dropdown menu. Basically the setting is for an image to sit inside the camera frame (will scale to fill the frame), and show itself as the Background where there is no physical geometry. I often use a black or a white one when I need to isolate my object, and don't want any Backdrop settings visible. (Background and Backdrop different things.. easily confused).

94959




I couldn't find this menu or anything called imageworld settings. I only see image world under windows>backdrop options>backdrop.
But there I can't see imageworld settings. Where's this menu? A search for imageworld settings in the help files didn't find anything.

If you click on the image world environment (when one is loaded), it bring up a sub menu, where you can control the rotation of the image and the intensity of it.

94960



I didn't build the model myself. It's a free model I got online. How do I check if my geometry is double sided?

If you load the object into modeller, and isolate the glass bulb, take a look at the polygon count when you select what looks like a single polygon, make sure it's 1. People sometimes build in what is called an air layer into glass objects so that you can have different refraction properties to the front and back of the glass, and to do this you need a front polygon facing outwards, and inward facing polygon. We don't need that here as a lightbulb's glass is so thin.



I see. I asked because I couldn't figure what this Default was doing in the scene or to what geometry it belongs?

Default is the default surface setup when you start building in Modeller. If you build something and don't change its surface name, it will be set at default. In this case, I think somewhere I have a polygon that I never changed the name of (or it can be a point for that matter). I doesn't effect the rendering because it is probably hidden, or very small, but it still registers the name "Default" in the surface list.



By the way, I see you have a surface called glass inner with a gradient in the reflection channel. What is the purpose of this surface? I don't have anything like that in mine. Maybe this is why the glass doesn't look the "same"?

This is actually the piece of glass that holds the wiring and the filament apparatus. I probably could have named it something more descriptive, but I called it inner glass because it's the only other surface that is glass, and it is inside the main bulb. And don't worry I would probably come back to the model in a year, and say.. what the hell is innerglass. If you're ever confused as to what surface represents what geometry, go into Modeller, and open the Statistics panel (w), (bottom of screen). Make sure you have the polygon tool selected, and go down to where it says Surf (none). Click on the drop down arrow beside it, and select the surface you want. Then hit the + sign to the left, and it will highlight the poly's in your object with that surface.

94961


Hope that helps ;)

Steve.

Pixelight
05-06-2011, 06:40 PM
Hi Steve,

First of all my apologies. I guess the internet can get you bad manners pretty easily and doesn't take long for you to complete overlook normal etiquette. :o

My name is Adam. :)

Thanks for the explanation. It all makes sense now.

The only thing left is to add the glow to the filament using the hypervoxels. Hope I can figure it out. Need to search for some tutorials.

I will post the result here when I'm finished or be back for more questions if I can't figure it. ;)

Thanks for all the great help so far Steve.

Adam.

Igu4n4
05-06-2011, 11:36 PM
Hi Adam,... :)

I won't go into a lot with Hypervoxels, but they are easy to engage, the tricky part is getting them to look like what you want. I personally love hypervoxels because you can use them for all sorts of things. They are aging a little, and it would be nice if they received some dev love, but there is still a lot you can use them for, and in this case, they are an easy solution to a visible light problem (which is quite complex using other methods).

You need to make the Filament it's own object. The easiest way to do this is just copy it into layer 2 in modeller. That way it will retain it's position relavent to the model. Back in Layout, make sure you parent it to the main bulb so that if you move the bulb, the filament will go with it. To do this, select the filament layer, go to frame 0 (I dont know know if you have parent in place on or not), and hit M. This brings up the Motions Options for the filament object. At the top of that window is a drop down that says "Parent Item". Select the main bulb layer, and you're done.

Now select the filament layer, and go into it's properties (P). Select the Dynamics tab (last tab), and Add Dynamic -> Emitter. This now makes it so that the filament will emit particles. In this case, you're not going to want a lot of particles because when we apply Hypervoxels, we're going to make them large, and too many particles will just make either a big mess, or will be overkill for what we're trying to achieve. So,... go into the Emitter settings that you just created, and set the Birth Rate to 50, and the Generated by to Frame, and the Nozzle to Object-Surface. Then go down near the bottom and change the Particle Limit to 50 as well.

94974

What you're doing here is creating 50 particles on the first frame of the animation, and setting them to emmit from the geometry of the filament. You're telling the emitter that after 50 particles are generated to *stop* producing particles because that 50 is the limit you want generated. If you click on the next tab called : Particles, set the Life Time(frame) to seomthing like 1000, this will keep those particles alive for 1000 frames before they die. This is incase you want to animate the bulb, they will stay active for quite a while.

Now you're going to want to start playing with the Hypervoxels. So Hypervoxels are visual voxel representations based on points/particles locations. Because we have setup our particles to sit on the surface of the filament object, the hypervoxels will sit on that filament. To enable Hypervoxels, go to Windows->Hypervoxels, and select the filament layer (if you put it into layer 2, it will be called something like "Lightbulb:Layer2". Once you have selected, click on Activate at the top of the window. Here is where the fun begins. There are 3 Hypervoxel models you can use.
-Sprite : which is a 2d camera facing visual that has no volume. It is always facing the camera, and it is the fastest to render. It's useful for many things.
-Volume : which is a 3d volumetric voxel, that has depth and volume, and can cast shadows on itself. Lots of uses, but most often used for smoke, fire, explosions, and special f/x.
-Surface : This is like a surface wrapper for particles. The particle surfaces blend in to each other (or repel), based on proximity to one and other. You can use these again for many things from liquid to organics. They can be shaded much like geometry, in that you can control their reflection, transparency, etc etc.

I'm just brushing the surface of what these Hypervoxel types do, and really giving you just a general description, there are more detailed explainations on the uses, and intricacies of what each can/do. But you can read up on those yourself. Basically everything you do from now on in the Geometry and Shading tabs will effect the look of these voxels.

For our purposes, we're going to use Sprites. They are fast, and probably the most designed for what you want to do, create the appearance of visible light glow. So set the Object Type to "Sprite". In Geometry tab, set the particle size to 25mm. This goes back to the conversation earlier about object size and scene scale. 25mm is pertinent to the size I created the object at. If your object is bigger or smaller, this value will matter. I know you resized your object to match the one I provided, so with that in mind, let's discuss the values based on that. Below the Particle Size is a box called Size Variation. That is exactly what it is... it creates a range of variance (big and small) to adjust the size of the Voxels for each particle. If you left it at 100% they would all be represented the same size. By putting in a Variation, you get some randomness, which is really key in doing anything, Life isn't perfect, and variation will make things feel more natural. Set it to 275% to give yourself a good range.

94975

Now that you have the general foundation of the hypervoxels set up. Move over to the Shading tab. Now for the purposes of creating a glow, here is what you do, and why. You pick a Colour that you want to be the colour of the outter glow, the part that is furthest away from the center of your light emission. You should pick the colour that corresponds to the colour of the light source inside the bulb (which in this case is your point light). The reason for this is that is what follows next. We're going to crank up the Luminosity value to full 500%. Now, where the voxels overlap (the sprites), they will compound their values. But the outer edges which don't overlap will be bright, but not compounded. This will cause the center of the flow around the filament to start to appear white (where it would be most intense), and the outter to appear more like what the colour you chose to be (althought probably a little more saturated).

Next the Opacity tab. The Higher the value, the more perceived transparency you will have, and the compound effect of the particles overlapping each other will be less. I dropped it to around 85% so that we kept that nice center dense glow.

The next tab is the Density tab. It is essentially just that.. Density. The higher the value, the more dense the sprite will be, and appear more opaque. The lower the value, the more transparent it will appear because for lack of a better definition it is less dense. Finally, when I use sprites I tend to change the Number of Slices to greater than 1. Basically it improves the quality of their representation. Finally at the bottom there is a set of selections to choose which lightsource illuminates the Hypervoxels. I'm just using Light1 which is the main external light. I could have used any others, but I would have to change these settings to accomodate which one I'm using.

94976

So now that you have that setup.. the last thing you can do is play with the HyperTexture tab.. it basically gives the Sprites some body by adding a texture to their surface. Again nothing is perfect, so some texture gives some variation to their appearance that feels more organic.


Playing with all these settings is really the only way to understand and be able to predict what they do, so now that you have this setup like we had intended, I'd play around with them, so you can get a good understand of how the settings work together, and how the variations will change how they look.


So there you go.. crash course in Hypervoxels (for this particular usage anyway) ;)

I got a PM from someone thanking me for the "lesson" on this lightbulb, and asked me why I would spend so much time answering a question. Well first, it's really not a lot of time, and second, I've been away from the community for a while, I read regularly, but haven't participated much, and I think a good solid community is one where people can learn from one and other, and support each others efforts. There is a lot of talk about Lightwave's age, abilities, how it stacks up against other packages etc, and that can be daunting to people who are learning how to use it, or wanting to learn how to use it. It is a great piece of software, with some shortcomings in some areas and some amazing abilities in others, but it is what you DO with it, that makes it worthwhile or not. And the only way you can DO, is by learning how to. The more people who are DO'ing, the better it is for all of us.

So, on that note, if you have any other questions, post'em :)


Steve.

GraphXs
05-07-2011, 12:11 AM
Nice light bulb!

Pixelight
05-10-2011, 02:15 PM
Hi Steve.

Thanks a whole lot for the tutorial. I had not trouble following it at all. Your explanations as you went along were very useful to help me understand how the process works and what things do.

Here's where I'm standing so far:

http://s4.postimage.org/ihs6lrz8/first_hypervoxels_render.jpg (http://postimage.org/image/ihs6lrz8/)

I couldn't figure why the hypevoxels are leaking to the side like that. My Stretch Direction is set to none, but I played around with it and it didn't change anything. But at least it's looking like a glow and it's behind something transparent too. :)



I got a PM from someone thanking me for the "lesson" on this lightbulb, and asked me why I would spend so much time answering a question. Well first, it's really not a lot of time, and second, I've been away from the community for a while, I read regularly, but haven't participated much, and I think a good solid community is one where people can learn from one and other, and support each others efforts. There is a lot of talk about Lightwave's age, abilities, how it stacks up against other packages etc, and that can be daunting to people who are learning how to use it, or wanting to learn how to use it. It is a great piece of software, with some shortcomings in some areas and some amazing abilities in others, but it is what you DO with it, that makes it worthwhile or not. And the only way you can DO, is by learning how to. The more people who are DO'ing, the better it is for all of us.

I'm glad you think that way. This thread should be a sticky. It's a staple of solidarity, good will and community sense. If for every 100 "read the manual" replies we would get one reply like yours is already worth it.
That line of thought makes this place a real community rather than just a neighborhood. ;)

Here was I, pretty deluded with Lightwave and how complex it is and really starting to think about maybe looking somewhere else. Then after you showed me the light (no pun intended) it really inspired me to try my best to master the program and look forward to developments rather than focus on it's shortcomings.

And there have been some other extremely helpful people around here too.

Don't get me wrong. The manual is the first thing I go to when I hit a wall, although I really don't find it's search function that useful and my 3D machine doesn't have a internet connection. But I could have never learned as much and from a practical point of view as I did here.



So, on that note, if you have any other questions, post'em :)


Thanks for that. :)

Igu4n4
05-10-2011, 03:21 PM
Hi Adam,.. Package up your scene and post it. It looks to me like the emitter has either some velocity set up (x,y,z) under the Motion Tab in the Object's properties->dynamics->FX Emitter. Or might have some gravity setup in the Etc Tab, in the same location.

If you have parented the emitter to the bulb object, and then moved the bulb object, the particles might look like that too, because they gain the parent's motion properties when parented to it.

Easy fix.. the rest is starting to look like you're getting to terms with the tools now :) good stuff!


Steve.

jeric_synergy
05-10-2011, 05:36 PM
If you have parented the emitter to the bulb object, and then moved the bulb object, the particles might look like that too, because they gain the parent's motion properties when parented to it.
Indeed. Sometimes an animation will highlight bugs like these, where a still wouldn't.

Pixelight
05-10-2011, 06:27 PM
Hi Adam,.. Package up your scene and post it. It looks to me like the emitter has either some velocity set up (x,y,z) under the Motion Tab in the Object's properties->dynamics->FX Emitter. Or might have some gravity setup in the Etc Tab, in the same location.

If you have parented the emitter to the bulb object, and then moved the bulb object, the particles might look like that too, because they gain the parent's motion properties when parented to it.

Easy fix.. the rest is starting to look like you're getting to terms with the tools now :) good stuff!


Steve.

Success! :D

http://s1.postimage.org/2qv4rbtvo/second_hypervoxels_render.jpg (http://postimage.org/image/2qv4rbtvo/)

I didn't actually do any parenting. But I must have moved the filament back and forth or something and it messed up the hypervoxels. I just re-started from scratch and it looks right. ;)
This hypervoxel thing looks to be a lot more useful than just what you would normally think as particles (smoke, fire, snow etc).
I was wondering, can you apply this to a text font as well?
The project I was working on before that one was one of those OPEN neon signs you see hanging on restaurants and stores where you have a neon text behind a clear plastic cover:

http://www.neonsignstoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/neon-open-sign.jpg

But I never got to finish it and make the clear cover. The glow function looked decent but now I know it won't work behind the clear plastic cover. If hypevoxels can be applied to text fonts too it could be the solution for that case as well. But maybe fonts are too complex with too many polygons for hypervoxel to work?

But above all I'm very happy the bulb is working. It was a great learning experience. I have to thank you again for all you did Steve.

Igu4n4
05-10-2011, 07:53 PM
Well I'm glad the lightbulb came to fruition. It looks good.. there's lots you can plan with now on the outside of the bulb (the screw base, etc), to get it looking really nice.

As for your Neon question, I don't think this same approach would work as well, because getting the particles to sit where you would like them to wouldn't be the easiest. You could do it.. but you'd have to rig up a seperate system to do it because geometric text, will place the particles on the objects normals or verticies.. basically they will collect around the edges of the font object.

Your better bet, honestly is to do that effect in post. Get it as far along as you can in Layout, render, and then do the glow in post. To explain what I mean.. I just banged out a few samples.

95071

This is straight out of Layout, using gradients with an Incidence angle falloff to control the luminosity and the colour. Because you have to crank some of these values up high for neon, Layout's GL doesn't do a fantastic job of illustrating it. So a render is in order...

95072

So this is all Layout VPR, with Radiosity turned on. No post. It's 90% of the way there... but to get that little bit of a glow.. you want to do a bit of work in post.

95073

This is the same render, with a duplicate layer, Gaussian blurred, and laid overtop of the original in "screen" mode. (You can do this in photoshop, afterfx, or really any compositing app).

And this get's you pretty darn close to where you want to be.

If you want to get into this more.. we can do it in another thread.


Steve.

Pixelight
05-10-2011, 08:45 PM
Well I'm glad the lightbulb came to fruition. It looks good..

Thanks. But I can't take any credit whatsoever. All I did was emulate what you did. Pretty much copied all settings with only a couple of exceptions. But it was a great learning experience.

About the neon sign, this is what I got when I tried hypervoxels. Only the font tips were glowing. Pity it doesn't work as well since the possibilities would be endless for motion graphics etc. I was already thinking of some text made of glowing hot metal or lava or something like that.

But I really like your neon sign. It looks pretty realistic! I actually think the second one before the compositing already looks great. Did you use glow on the effects tab or is it all luminosity? Is the glass a material or just surface editor?

It looks really great.