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dalecampbelljr
04-12-2011, 04:00 PM
I need to print a movie style poster for my short. Now I know this will sound really newbie, but I have never needed to do this; so how do I render out a still for print at say 20"x30" 600dpi? Or at least something like that.

tribbles
04-12-2011, 04:27 PM
You'll need to set up the resolution - and that's pretty much it.

20"x30" @ 600dpi is 12000x18000 pixels - which I think is in the range for LW (although I may be wrong on that - there might be a 16384 pixel maximum). If it is larger than the maximum size, then you'll need to split it somehow, but it's not something I've needed to do.

I did 18"x42" @ 300dpi the other day (printed onto canvas).

dalecampbelljr
04-12-2011, 04:33 PM
Is there still a plugin called "Print Assistant" for Lightwave?

kopperdrake
04-13-2011, 05:45 AM
600dpi's pretty high - for a poster I'd imagine 300dpi would be more than fine. Often for big stuff (say 2.5m x 2.9m) we produce at 100dpi. It all depends on how close your viewer is going to be to the actual print.

Tribbles pretty much said it all - just multiply the size (in inches) by the DPI needed (dots per inch), so 20" @ 600dpi would be 20 x 600 (20 inches with 600 dots per inch).

ingo
04-13-2011, 06:48 AM
the best is to ask the company that does the prints, they could tell you what size and resolution you need.

tribbles
04-13-2011, 05:20 PM
Just to expand a bit:

I agree with ingo, and ask the print company if it's the first one you've done. They may know a bit about LW and resolutions, but they may just say "do it at <x> DPI". I didn't put the equations in, but kopperdrake did that for you.

If you want to print edge-to-edge, then you may be asked to provide some "bleed" for the print - this is basically oversized printing, so if you're doing a 20"x30" print, and there's a 0.5" bleed (this is quite large, but easy for the next bit of maths), then you need to do 21"x31" - which means 21x600 by 31x600 resolution (12600x18600). The bleed allows the registration of the cutter to be out by a bit.

If they don't say you need a bleed, then ask just in case - otherwise you could end up with some white down some of the edges. Don't forget that the camera focal length/zoom will need adjusting as you'll want to still have your object in the centre.

kopperdrake
04-14-2011, 04:40 AM
Actually tribbles - you've just pointed out a feature that I'd love in LightWave - an 'autobleed' which automatically adds bleed to an image. Some briefs are so tight on placement that you need to be so careful when allowing extra at the edges that your main image will still show.

And even though I've been rendering for print for 16 years and have no worries working out appropriate resolutions, I would like to see a 'render for print' option box where you can type in your required physical image size, the required DPI, the required bleed, and when the image is finally dropped out of the renderer, if the file format can handle it, for the dpi to be set within the file.

Dale - sorry if I'm teaching you to suck eggs, but the 'bleed' is just a spare bit of image running round the edge of your image that doesn't matter if/when it gets guillotined off when they cut your poster out of the larger piece of paper it might be printed on. That way your image will run to the edge of the paper. Some places will print your poster in the middle of a pre-cut piece of paper, and will automatically leave a white border.

Matt
04-14-2011, 09:50 PM
Guess everyone missed my LScript for this:

DPI_Camera_v1.2.2.zip (http://www.pixsim.co.uk/LW_Scripts/DPI_Camera_v1.2.2.zip)

I have asked about replacing the one that ships with LightWave, because, well, mine is waaaaaay better!

:)

lardbros
04-15-2011, 07:03 AM
Guess everyone missed my LScript for this:

DPI_Camera_v1.2.2.zip (http://www.pixsim.co.uk/LW_Scripts/DPI_Camera_v1.2.2.zip)

I have asked about replacing the one that ships with LightWave, because, well, mine is waaaaaay better!

:)

Was thinking this the other day... get on it and replace the old one, it's ancient! :D

dalecampbelljr
04-18-2011, 12:15 PM
Guess everyone missed my LScript for this:

DPI_Camera_v1.2.2.zip (http://www.pixsim.co.uk/LW_Scripts/DPI_Camera_v1.2.2.zip)

I have asked about replacing the one that ships with LightWave, because, well, mine is waaaaaay better!

:)

Anything special I need to know about your plugin?

kopperdrake
04-18-2011, 03:04 PM
Guess everyone missed my LScript for this:

DPI_Camera_v1.2.2.zip (http://www.pixsim.co.uk/LW_Scripts/DPI_Camera_v1.2.2.zip)

I have asked about replacing the one that ships with LightWave, because, well, mine is waaaaaay better!

:)

Blimey - there's one wish sorted! Thanks Matt :thumbsup:

<closes eyes> I wish I knew next week's lotto numbers...

Matt
04-21-2011, 08:13 AM
Anything special I need to know about your plugin?

It's not limited to only inches and picas (I'm adding picas support in mine) tells you the size of the resulting pixels, has a bleed setting (which adds all the way around) has presets.

DELTA DIGITAL
04-30-2011, 09:29 PM
I did a large 3'x4' menu for my friends restaurant and I printed it out at 300 dpi with no quality issues. It also depends on what your printing it on and the equipment being used.

daforum
06-22-2011, 12:03 PM
I need some advice.
I've set the pixels at the right size to render a 300dpi image, but what I don't understand is when I render the image and open it in Photoshop it is 72dpi :stumped:

Is there a way to render so the resulting image is 300dpi when opened in Photoshop?

tribbles
06-22-2011, 01:50 PM
From memory, Photoshop just defaults it to 72dpi. You can change it in Photoshop, but I forget how (it's been a long time since I've used it).

I think you can do it by resizing it - when you change the DPI, the pixel count changes, but you can replace them with the original pixel count.

Matt
06-22-2011, 05:30 PM
I need some advice.
I've set the pixels at the right size to render a 300dpi image, but what I don't understand is when I render the image and open it in Photoshop it is 72dpi :stumped:

Is there a way to render so the resulting image is 300dpi when opened in Photoshop?

LightWave has no knowledge of dpi, as that's a print concept.

But if you uncheck the "Resample Image" checkbox in the "Image Size" properties in Photoshop, you can set the image to be 300dpi without resizing.

(Apologies if you knew this already).

daforum
06-24-2011, 03:04 PM
Thanks Matt for the info about this :)
I did know about what to do in Photoshop, but it's always good to have this info, so next time when the person I'm doing the job for doesn't believe me I can show them from a reliable source that what I said is the same.

It would be good if LightWave could render for print in the same way as Photoshop sets up an image for print; but probably won't be able to happen as you said, it has no knowledge of dpi.

Matt
06-24-2011, 03:19 PM
Thanks Matt for the info about this :)
I did know about what to do in Photoshop, but it's always good to have this info, so next time when the person I'm doing the job for doesn't believe me I can show them from a reliable source that what I said is the same.

It would be good if LightWave could render for print in the same way as Photoshop sets up an image for print; but probably won't be able to happen as you said, it has no knowledge of dpi.

Did you try my DPI Camera script, which the more I think about it, I think I will add it into LightWave.

daforum
06-25-2011, 07:19 AM
I have installed and looked at the script GUI, it looks very cool.
I like the presets that are included and the bleed function too; but i've not had a chance to use it yet. Not until my next render for print job (which will be soon)

lardbros
06-25-2011, 03:14 PM
Did you try my DPI Camera script, which the more I think about it, I think I will add it into LightWave.

Definitely do this matt, it'll save me having to add it each update :-)

Matt
06-25-2011, 03:24 PM
Definitely do this matt, it'll save me having to add it each update :-)

Alrighty, I'll do that, your wish is my command! :)

DrStrik9
07-14-2011, 01:22 PM
My personal favorite dpi script is ... drum roll .. my calculator. :)

[Size in Inches] TIMES [Resolution per Inch] (i.e. 300 dpi, 450 dpi, etc.)
EQUALS the number of pixels the image needs to be rendered.

Example: Image needs to be 26.5" in width, to be printed @ 450 dpi:

26" x 450 dpi = 11925 pixels

Really simple.

Matt
07-15-2011, 11:34 AM
My personal favorite dpi script is ... drum roll .. my calculator. :)

[Size in Inches] TIMES [Resolution per Inch] (i.e. 300 dpi, 450 dpi, etc.)
EQUALS the number of pixels the image needs to be rendered.

Example: Image needs to be 26.5" in width, to be printed @ 450 dpi:

26" x 450 dpi = 11925 pixels

Really simple.

If you work in inches, but for those that don't it's more hassle.

lardbros
07-15-2011, 01:22 PM
If you work in inches, but for those that don't it's more hassle.

Yup, agreed! :-) Us Brits don't use the inch much for such things.... Awkward? I dunno... Inches seem awkward to me :-)

DrStrik9
07-21-2011, 06:42 PM
If you work in inches, but for those that don't it's more hassle.

Pixels per cm or pixels per inch: pixel-dimension is derived by exactly the same arithmetic. So why would one of them be a hassle? Sorry, I just don't get it.

300 pixels per inch is the same as 118.11 per cm. 450 per inch = 177.165 per cm. After that, just substitute numbers and calculate.

lardbros
07-21-2011, 06:49 PM
Dunno!? Is it because we use DPI in our printing, yet measure out page sizes in mm? We'd have to convert our measurements to inches first wouldn't we? Anyway... It's late, I might be wrong, and surely it's easier having a script that does it all for you? ;)

Matt
07-24-2011, 10:58 PM
Pixels per cm or pixels per inch: pixel-dimension is derived by exactly the same arithmetic. So why would one of them be a hassle? Sorry, I just don't get it.

300 pixels per inch is the same as 118.11 per cm. 450 per inch = 177.165 per cm. After that, just substitute numbers and calculate.

Because you need to convert metric to imperial to do the calculations, and not everyone knows the conversion math in their head!

It just makes it easier, if you're happy with a calculator, that's great, others prefer an easier, quicker solution, because we're lazy!

buco
07-29-2011, 04:22 PM
My rule of thumb for big print is: 1 meter 1000 pixels; so, 6x3 meters (usually the target I work for) 6000*3000. Once you've set your standard it's easy to have the idea without big calculations..
Obviously this numbers change if I have to print for magazines or smaller formats.
Anyway, if you know dpi and final print dimensions, input these values in photoshop (in feet, inches, meters or millimeters as you like) and it will display the corresponding pixels resolution for your render without any hassle for your brain :)

@ daforum:
dpi information is only for the printer and paper, monitors only use pixels. So if you have a 1000x1000 resolution image it will be displayed always the same on your monitor even if you change dpi setting. Only when you print it you'll notice the difference in dimensions because you'll set different dots density with dpi. Basically dpi says to the printer how much space your 1000 pixels will occupy on your paper

daforum
08-01-2011, 04:03 PM
Thanks for the info buco :thumbsup:
I need to render (bigger) from now on so when I just change the dpi (not the pixel dimensions) in photoshop I'll be guaranteed to get the correct size for print.

Matt's DPI script will be good for calculating the pixel size to render in LightWave.

buco
08-02-2011, 05:34 PM
You're welcome!
Going to try Matt's script; seems very interesting to me

moussepipi2000
08-11-2011, 08:22 PM
Hi matt. i tried your script , its very useful but maybe for the bleed option, instead of increasing only pixel resolution it would be cool to see the camera become wider (Focal shorter if the bleed is superior to 0) . so when i decided my final image with lightwave camera and lunch your script i can set bleed and it will render larger my image (resolution and filed of view). in that case No problem at all for the bleed !

converse
09-14-2011, 06:41 PM
Much depends on the detail required of final print. How far away will the audience be to the item itself, type of paper,equipment used etc. This seems like a basic print job. Over complicate it at your mercy.