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shrox
04-10-2011, 12:21 AM
Ancient stone makers along the coasts of Japan warned of places not to build due to tsunami danger, but their message had been forgotten. I wonder how many other similar "warning signs" there are posted around the world that have been forgotten?

A link to the story:
http://articles.boston.com/2011-04-06/news/29389325_1_tsunami-sea-walls-leak-of-radioactive-water

achrystie
04-10-2011, 05:15 AM
I come from a coastal town that is a tourist area and has a lot of second "summer homes". for the last 60 years or so, people have continually come down and spent tons of money building houses right on the beach. Many have lost these homes over the course of the ebb and flow of tides and coastlines. Worse, millions of dollars that could be better spent in numerous other ways, has instead been allocated to recovery, rescue, retaining walls, and insurance claims.

The same "old salts" that were shaking their heads when the houses were built, are still shaking their heads today, but also now screaming as their taxes go up and more and more local government is added to work on and regulate all this.

For confirmation of this basic conventional wisdom, one nearly needs to look at the numerous site seeing attractions of "old sea captains" homes. All have a view of the water, but every single one is built on a high hill.

erikals
04-10-2011, 06:08 AM
i've wondered about this many times, it's up to the government to keep track of those things and make the required rules though...

Lamont
04-11-2011, 02:17 AM
We have earthquakes 1~2 times a month, normal. Tsunami drills are a part of life on coastal areas. Every sea-born quake triggers the tsunami alarm, no matter how small the quake is (they will flash on screen of a 10cm tsunami). Everyone knows, from the kids in kindergarten to old folks, to get high. Building codes are VERY strict and homes made long ago still stand. The reaction to an earthquake here is much different than other places, the workplace and schools have drills. Everyone knows a large quake can happen any time here.

To say that people have forgotten?

Had two quakes while typing this post. Yeah, no one forgets.

JonW
04-11-2011, 02:31 AM
We have an excellent record of floods (& droughts). But for some reason it's never going to flood again, & so we build even more houses in these areas!

When Australia was first settled the Aborigines were at the tail end of a decade long drought, doesn't that sound familiar!

History repeating itself! But my guess is that we will never learn!

shrox
04-11-2011, 11:36 AM
We have earthquakes 1~2 times a month, normal. Tsunami drills are a part of life on coastal areas. Every sea-born quake triggers the tsunami alarm, no matter how small the quake is (they will flash on screen of a 10cm tsunami). Everyone knows, from the kids in kindergarten to old folks, to get high. Building codes are VERY strict and homes made long ago still stand. The reaction to an earthquake here is much different than other places, the workplace and schools have drills. Everyone knows a large quake can happen any time here.

To say that people have forgotten?

Had two quakes while typing this post. Yeah, no one forgets.

The story mentions that in many areas had been built up right to the coast, one area below an 600 year old marker that said "Do not build homes below this point".

I hope that they will heed them now.

glebe digital
04-11-2011, 01:57 PM
I hope that they will heed them now.

People gotta eat & live......look at those 'crazy' Italians living right under Vesuvius.

Lamont
04-11-2011, 02:58 PM
Yeah, we have a stone marker telling about the last volcano eruption (I live between two volcano's 1 is 10km away the other is 6km). But it's one of the larger flatter and most hospitable areas on this island (Japan). Iwate is big on agriculture, just as the coast is huge for fishing and industry. There are areas here where no buildings can be made because the ground would liquify in a quake.

Land space is at a serious premium here (not like AZ where you can let go of the steering wheel of your car, and run out of gas before you hit something..), people have to eat and live. They know about tsunamis, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and what can happen. It just rubs me the wrong way when people say "they forgot" when "gentle" reminders are constant.

shrox
04-11-2011, 03:14 PM
Yeah, we have a stone marker telling about the last volcano eruption (I live between two volcano's 1 is 10km away the other is 6km). But it's one of the larger flatter and most hospitable areas on this island (Japan). Iwate is big on agriculture, just as the coast is huge for fishing and industry. There are areas here where no buildings can be made because the ground would liquify in a quake.

Land space is at a serious premium here (not like AZ where you can let go of the steering wheel of your car, and run out of gas before you hit something..), people have to eat and live. They know about tsunamis, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and what can happen. It just rubs me the wrong way when people say "they forgot" when "gentle" reminders are constant.

Right here in Arizona people build in the rivers' flood plain. It just a trickle now, but every decade or so, a major flood happens, and trouble comes. In the metro area the cities bought up all the flood plain and made it into parks and green spaces.

No offence intended, I lived in San Francisco, and I risked being in "the Big One" everyday I was there. They get reminds too, but the reality of destruction just doesn't seem real on a nice sunny day.

Lamont
04-11-2011, 03:19 PM
The reality of destruction just doesn't seem real on a nice sunny day.I think it's just called "living" for some. Nature can take and do whatever it wants when it wants.

shrox
04-11-2011, 03:27 PM
I think it's just called "living" for some. Nature can take and do whatever it wants when it wants.

Yes, but listening and heeding elders' advice is a good thing. They've been there and don't want anyone else to see and know what they saw.

Lamont
04-11-2011, 07:00 PM
Some of those "elders" are still alive and remember the last tsunami that wiped out a portion of their town. They made the choice to live and settle there. They know what can happen. More safe-guards, yes. Moving a town 1~3km inland... move San Fransisco to the desert first. Take Montana, make 1/3 of it non-livable (farmland, mountains, forest, lakes, bears), surround it with water and multiply the population by 127.

San Fran is built on top of a quivering landfill, all they can do is make sure that buildings made after the last quake on can withstand the next one. Same with cities and towns on the coast, all they can do is make better safety measures. Nothing is 100%, but it sure did help when the time came.