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View Full Version : "Sticky Wind" - function?



jeric_synergy
03-17-2011, 05:33 PM
Anyone know what the "Sticky Wind" mode of the Wind Dynamic does? It's not in thedox.

prometheus
03-21-2011, 08:19 AM
Embarrasing..no one knows:stumped:

I thought I knew it or did sometime ago, but just probably havenīt had a situation were it was needed.

I think it will only work with collision objects, It is affecting a particle field if its applied on a collision object set to sticky at least.

But I canīt give you a proper answer, I did search around a little but couldnīt find anything either, I have to check some books at home later on.

Michael

bazsa73
03-21-2011, 02:35 PM
Most strange wind ever. I just tried it now with an emitter but nothing predictable.
It is a strange wind.

XswampyX
03-21-2011, 03:04 PM
I've just had a quick try, and it seems to behave as a viscous fluid. Drop a cloth object through it.

jeric_synergy
03-21-2011, 04:39 PM
Embarrasing..no one knows:stumped:
It IS embarrassing.... because "somebody" neglected to include it in the dox.

And they should be very embarrassed.

And if they don't like their feet being held to the fire, they should quit lighting the fire. :devil:

Dodgy
03-23-2011, 02:58 AM
Sticky wind deflects particles, much as your arm would wafting through smoke.

prometheus
03-23-2011, 05:52 AM
Sticky wind deflects particles, much as your arm would wafting through smoke.

Perhaps It should be renamed in future lightwave versions to Deflector wind, and add your simple post comment to the documentation.

funny how I was trying to move the wind in a particle field without velocity and nothing happens to the particles, so my tip is to use it
whenever you have particles with a velocity direction and use it as a deflector.

Thanks dodgy.


Michael

prometheus
03-23-2011, 06:06 AM
Correction...sorry I was using wrong wind, weird how my concentration is today.

sticky wind wonīt really deflect in any direction, it seems to behave more like a stop deflector, so sticky wind might be the correct name anyway.

Michael

stiff paper
03-23-2011, 10:06 AM
Hey now, this is a fun game. Let's all compare our different ideas about what sticky wind does!

Yes, with particles at least, it acts as a "braking force". If you have particles flying around and they hit a patch of sticky wind they'll come to a halt or slow down, depending on your settings. That's my understanding... if you know anything extra then let's hear it...

I suppose in a way it's not as well named as it could have been... they should really have called it "Brake Wind", but I think I can see why they didn't...

jeric_synergy
03-23-2011, 10:29 AM
I suppose in a way it's not as well named as it could have been... they should really have called it "Brake Wind", but I think I can see why they didn't...
:D That has the virtue of being memorable. :thumbsup:

"Viscosity Wind". "Resistance Wind".

Well, really, I don't care what they call it: but it sure would be nice if it were documented.

A pity there isn't an official online doc that Newtek regularly updated. Or allowed users to update. Or monthly PDF releases that fixed these omissions. Man, that would be like working in the 21st Century or something.

Oh, wait.....

(google reveals "sticky wind" may have been around since 6.5???? All that time and no dox???)

prometheus
03-23-2011, 12:20 PM
Yes documentation is needed, but what about all old lightwave users?

would be nice to have some feedback here to where and when the sticky wind is in Itīs prime to use.

I could think of having a sticky wind in front of the nose of a space shuttle
and then an emitter in front of that with particles velocity aimed at the nose and at the sticky wind, that migth give a good spread of the particles simulating atmosphere entry and the heat with fireflames.

Michael

jeric_synergy
03-23-2011, 12:37 PM
would be nice to have some feedback here to where and when the sticky wind is in Itīs prime to use.
Michael
Hopefully the whole Lightwiki thing will eventually get sorted, and Newtek will give them some money.

Dodgy
03-23-2011, 03:52 PM
This is what happens when you set the particles to have 5m/s velocity in the Y and have a sticky wind above it set to 1000%. The particles don't just stop, they deflect around the wind.

stiff paper
03-23-2011, 04:03 PM
Years ago, and if I had to guess I'd say either 2001 or 2002, Desktop Images published a VHS tape ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vhs ) called "Lightwave ParticleFX Concepts".

It was performed/written by Brad Peebler and it went through all of the ParticleFX functionality. At least, that's how I remember it. It has been a while.

A lot of water has passed under the bridge since then, and I guess some people wouldn't even know who Brad is. I think it's probably safe to say he's not going to be doing another LW training dvd any time soon though.

If you can find a used version of the vhs (or maybe it even made it to dvd - I don't know) then I can recommend it so long as you don't pay too much for it. (Remember though that I'm recommending it from memory... I remember it being useful, but sometimes the memory cheats.)

Edit: Should have googled it first: http://www.desktopimages.com/index_cards/DI1078.shtml

I'm not sure they're still selling it rather than that just being a leftover page. Don't anybody pay that much for it. I will feel bad if you don't find it useful (!)

Another edit: New and used on DVD at Amazon from $22. Better.

stiff paper
03-23-2011, 04:18 PM
@Dodgy "This is what happens when you set the particles to have 5m/s velocity in the Y and have a sticky wind above it set to 1000%. The particles don't just stop, they deflect around the wind."

Oh, hey, now that I didn't know. Interesting. Is the behavior there the same as spherical geometry with collision?

VirtualFM
03-23-2011, 07:49 PM
Like Dodgy says, if you use powers over 100% it starts to act like the "explosion" wind (in the inverse proportion of its radius), but makes the particles stop after a while, usually in a perfect sphere the size of the radius of the wind force.

FWIW, and using Lightwave's own nomenclature, "Sticky Wind" should be renamed as "Drag Wind", as it's what it does: slows the particles to a crawl or stops them completely. If you use <100% it slows them down. If you use 100% it makes them stop (like if it's killing their momentum), if you use >100%... i don't remember correctly, but I think it makes them stop forming a sphere.

It really works well when using other winds and making particles move around in a more controlled manner than with "doughnut" or something like that.

jeric_synergy
03-24-2011, 01:30 PM
VirtualFM, that's a good idea: although we probably can't get it renamed (worse luck) it's a valuable way of THINKING ABOUT it.

Thanks everybody for doing research on this, and don't let me stop you......